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Are Private Placements Good?

Are Private Placements Good

A private placement is a sale of stock shares or bonds to pre-selected investors and institutions rather than on the open market. It is an alternative to an initial public offering (IPO) for a company seeking to raise capital for expansion. Investors invited to participate in private placement programs include wealthy individual investors, banks and other financial institutions, mutual funds, insurance companies, and pension funds. One advantage of a private placement is its relatively few regulatory requirements. Small businesses face the constant challenge of raising affordable capital to fund business operations. Equity financing comes in a wide range of forms, including venture capital, an initial public offering, business loans, and private placement. Established companies may choose the route of an initial public offering to raise capital through selling shares of company stock. However, this strategy can be complex and costly, and it may not be suitable for smaller, less-established businesses. As an alternative to an initial public offering, businesses that want to offer shares to investors can complete a private placement investment. This strategy allows a company to sell shares of company stock to a select group of investors privately instead of the public. Private placement has advantages over other equity financing methods, including less burdensome regulatory requirements, reduced cost and time, and the ability to remain a private company.

Regulatory Requirements for Private Placement

When a company decides to issue shares of an initial public offering, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires the company to meet a lengthy list of requirements. Detailed financial reporting is necessary once an initial public offering is issued, and any shareholder must be able to access the company’s financial statements at any time. This information should provide enough disclosure to investors so they can make informed investment decisions. Private placements are offered to a small group of select investors instead of the public. So, companies employing this type of financing do not need to comply with the same reporting and disclosure regulations. Instead, private placement financing deals are exempt from SEC regulations under Regulation D. There is less concern from the SEC regarding participating investors’ level of investment knowledge because more sophisticated investors (such as pension funds, mutual fund companies, and insurance companies) purchase the majority of private placement shares.

Saved Cost and Time

Equity financing deals such as initial public offerings and venture capital often take time to configure and finalize. There are extensive vetting processes in place from the SEC and venture capitalist firms with which companies seeking this type of capital must comply before receiving funds. Completing all the necessary requirements can take up to a year, and the costs associated with doing so can be a burden to the business. The nature of a private placement makes the funding process much less time-consuming and far less costly for the receiving company. Because no securities registration is necessary, fewer legal fees are associated with this strategy compared to other financing options. Additionally, the smaller number of investors in the deal results in less negotiation before the company receives funding.

Private Means Private

The greatest benefit to a private placement is the company’s ability to remain a private company. The exemption under Regulation D allows companies to raise capital while keeping financial records private instead of disclosing information each quarter to the buying public. A business obtaining investment through private placement is also not required to give up a seat on the board of directors or a management position to the group of investors. Instead, control over business operations and financial management remains with the owner, unlike a venture capital deal.

Understanding Private Placement

There are minimal regulatory requirements and standards for a private placement even though, like an IPO, it involves the sale of securities. The sale does not even have to be registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The company is not required to provide a prospectus to potential investors and detailed financial information may not be disclosed. The sale of stock on the public exchanges is regulated by the Securities Act of 1933, which was enacted after the market crash of 1929 to ensure that investors receive sufficient disclosure when they purchase securities. Regulation D of that act provides a registration exemption for private placement offerings. The same regulation allows an issuer to sell securities to a pre-selected group of investors that meet specified requirements. Instead of a prospectus, private placements are sold using a private placement memorandum (PPM) and cannot be broadly marketed to the general public. It specifies that only accredited investors may participate. These may include individuals or entities such as venture capital firms that qualify under the SEC’s terms.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Private Placement

Private placements have become a common way for startups to raise financing, particularly those in the internet and financial technology sectors. They allow these companies to grow and develop while avoiding the full glare of public scrutiny that accompanies an IPO. Buyers of private placements demand higher returns than they can get on the open markets. As an example, Light speed Systems, an Austin-based company that creates content-control and monitoring software for K-12 educational institutions, raised an undisclosed amount of money in a private placement Series D financing round in March 2019. The funds were to be used for business development.

A Speedier Process

Above all, a young company can remain a private entity, avoiding the many regulations and annual disclosure requirements that follow an IPO. The light regulation of private placements allows the company to avoid the time and expense of registering with the SEC. That means the process of underwriting is faster, and the company gets its funding sooner. If the issuer is selling a bond, it also avoids the time and expense of obtaining a credit rating from a bond agency. A private placement allows the issuer to sell a more complex security to accredited investors who understand the potential risks and rewards.

A More Demanding Buyer

The buyer of a private placement bond issue expects a higher rate of interest than can be earned on a publicly-traded security. Because of the additional risk of not obtaining a credit rating, a private placement buyer may not buy a bond unless it is secured by specific collateral. A private placement stock investor may also demand a higher percentage of A private placement – or non-public offering – is where a business sells corporate bonds or shares to investors without offering them for sale on the open market. These investors could be insurance companies or high-net-worth individuals. By selling corporate bonds you can raise funds for expanding your business, to finance mergers, or to supplement or replace bank funding. Raising funds in this way offers benefits such as providing stability through long-term investment and protecting the value of your business’ shares – see advantages and disadvantages of raising finance by issuing corporate bonds. By using private placements, you can raise a significant amount of finance, and often quite quickly. A private placement doesn’t need to involve brokers or underwriters and instead they can usually be arranged through banks or specialist financial institutions.

Advantages of using private placements

There are several advantages to using private placements to raise finance for your business. They:
• allow you to choose your own investors – this increases the chances of having investors with similar objectives to you and means they may be able to provide business advice and assistance, as well as funding
• allow you to remain a private company, rather than having to go public to raise finance
• provide flexibility in the amount and type of funding – e.g. allowing a combination of bonds and equity capital, with amounts ranging from less than £100,000 to several million pounds
• allow you to make a return on the investment over a longer time period – as private placement investors will be prepared to be more patient than other investors, such as venture capitalists
• require less investment of both money and time than public share flotation

• provide a faster turnaround on raising finance than the venture capital markets or public placements
As a result, private placements are sometimes the only source of raising substantial capital for more risky ventures or new businesses.
Disadvantages of using private placements
There are also some disadvantages of using private placements to raise business finance. For example, there will be:
• a reduced market for the bonds or shares in your business, which may have a long-term effect on the value of the business as a whole
• a limited number of potential investors, who may not want to invest substantial amounts individually
• the need to place the bonds or shares at a substantial discount to compensate investors for their greater risk and longer-term returns
Additionally, although it isn’t a mandatory requirement, having a credit rating can be an advantage. However, this is time consuming and will be an added cost to the process. The private placement definition is the process of raising capital directly from institutional investors. A company that does not have access to or does not wish to make use of public capital markets can issue stocks, bonds, or other financial instruments directly to institutional investors. Institutional investors include the following:
• Mutual funds,
• Pension funds
• Insurance companies
• Large banks
You do not have to register private placement issuances with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). In addition, you do not have to provide a detailed prospectus. The issuing company and the purchasing investors negotiate the terms and conditions are negotiated. You cannot trade private placement securities on public markets, but they can be traded privately among institutional investors after they have been issued by the issuing company. A private placement is in contrast to a public offering, which is issued in public capital markets, requires a detailed prospectus, must be registered with the SEC, and can be traded by the investing public in the secondary markets.

In this Placement, the securities are issued to a limited number of investors who are “accredited”. An accredited investor is the one who: –
• Meets a certain threshold of financial net worth and qualifications.
• Is more experienced in making investments and making prudent financial decisions.
• Could afford taking risks and losses arising from such an investment.
Differences Between Private Placement Program and Public Offering
• The securities are sold to a group of investors in the private placement of shares whereas in public offering the securities are offered to the public.
• Private placement of shares can be issued by both public and private Companies whereas in case of public offering the Company is either listed or will be listed after the offer is made.
• This placement deals may not be required to be registered with a regulator whereas the deals in which securities are offered publicly have to be registered with a regulator.
• The private placement of shares, if done by a private company will not affect the share price because they are not listed. However, for a public listed Company, this placement will lead to a decline in share price at least in the near term.

Some of the largest and most powerful companies in the world were created by raising capital in the public markets. Oil companies, utilities, food and beverage, and technology companies have all accessed the public market to fund their day-to-day operations and grow their businesses. By selling all or part of a business in a public offering, companies that go public receive an immediate influx of capital. While this might appeal to some companies, others understand that public ownership comes at a price. By choosing to stay private, they do not have to report to a large group of shareholders and are able to keep their business plans and finances private. Startups typically become established as private entities using capital from the owners or outside investors, cash generated from the business, and bank loans. When the company’s growth or survival requires more capital than those sources can offer, it may decide to sell all or part of the business by offering its stock to the public. By doing so, companies become subject to greater scrutiny by regulators and shareholders. Companies may be willing to sacrifice control and privacy to access large amounts of capital they might otherwise not be able to obtain. They can use publicly traded stock as a form of currency for purposes that would normally require large amounts of cash, such as purchasing other companies or compensating officers.

For some companies, the drawbacks of public ownership outweigh the lure of accessing large amounts of capital. One of the major reasons a company stays private is that there are few requirements for reporting. For example, a private company is not subject to Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules, which require annual reporting and third-party auditing. Anyone who has held shares in a publicly-traded company knows all about glossy annual reports that contain extensive information about a company’s finances. Private companies do not need to produce such reports or disclose important information about their finances to the public. While they must practice accurate and current accounting, they do not need to meet the stringent and complex accounting rules and standards applied to public companies. Although private companies cannot raise capital in the public markets, they do have access to it through other sources like bank financing. Private companies that have been in business for long time periods have established relationships with their banks and can tap into commercial lines of credit when needed. The companies can also use their assets or inventory as collateral for the loan.

Investing in a Private Company

Private companies can also raise capital by offering stock ownership to outside parties or to employees. The value of a private company’s stock is determined by private valuation. Some companies carry the stock at cost on their books, while others may use a different valuation method. Investors who own stock in a privately held company must be prepared to accept the valuations and terms that companies dictate. Offering stock to outside investors usually comes as a prelude to going public, and the purchasers are often venture capital sources. A company may go public more gradually by offering stock to employees as an incentive or as part of their compensation. This gives them an incentive to devote their efforts toward one goal and raises needed capital. United Parcel Service (NYSE:UPS) remained private from its founding in 1907 until it went public in 1999. Prior to going public, UPS regularly offered its private stock for employees to purchase or as compensation. While the majority of the first shareholders probably didn’t fully recognize the value of their shares, they found out when the stock started trading on a public exchange, and its price was determined by public demand.

There are many reasons to take a company public; the most common one is to have instant access to large amounts of capital. However, that access also comes at a high price in the form of scrutiny by the SEC and shareholders. As a result, many private companies prefer to stay private and find alternate sources of capital. Traditional lending institutions provide collateralized loans and stock that can be used as private currency or sold to employees to raise capital. This means that while it is possible to invest in private companies, it usually requires close ties to the company.

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Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

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About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.