fbpx
8833 South Redwood Road
Suite C
West Jordan, UT 84088

Call For Free Consultation

(801) 676-5506


Call Us

Business License Requirements

Business License Requirements

State and local authorities often require even more small business licenses and have more issues to consider than the regulations imposed by the federal government. When you start a business, there are federal and state rules and regulations that the company must abide by in order to legally operate.

State and local governments have more wide-ranging regulations for businesses, and there are more local issues for small businesses to consider when starting up. For example, in addition to the federal and local requirements for businesses to obtain licenses, small business owners must also consider other local issues, such as zoning ordinances, building codes, and lease considerations.

State License Requirements

Business licensing requirements differ from state to state, but most state governments typically require the following types of licenses and permits:
State business license: Essentially, a state business license is used to track and monitor businesses for tax purposes and are required for businesses to operate lawfully in the state. Most states have agencies specifically created to deal with issuing state licenses.

Licenses for selling certain products: States require businesses to have licenses to sell products such as liquor, firearms, and gasoline.
Occupational licenses: All states regulate certain professions and require practitioners of those occupations to obtain (and maintain) licenses in order to do business. States require licenses for doctors, lawyers, accountants, real estate agents, private security guards, funeral directors, private investigators, barbers, and many other professions. To confirm whether your state requires your business to have an occupational license, contact your state’s licensing authorities.

Unemployment insurance: For businesses with employees, most states require the business to purchase into their system of unemployment insurance. Contact your state’s Department of Labor to find out more. Also, don’t forget to have worker’s compensation insurance in case someone is injured on the job. This is a must if you have any employees or independent contractors you pay to do work for you.

Tax registration: For states with a sales tax, you will have to submit an application for a sales tax license to charge customers.

Local Issues

Register your business name: You’ll have to register your business name with local (and likely state) agencies such as the county clerk, along with the business address. You’ll need to take care to pick a name that isn’t being used by another business. If the business is an LLC or corporation, the business name will be registered with the state when you submit the articles of incorporation. If you’re a sole proprietor, the default name will be your name, but you can apply to use a fictitious name (also known as a DBA—”doing business as”) with the city or county. Partnerships can also apply for a DBA with the city or county.

Environmental permits: In addition to state and federal agencies that cover environmental issues, local agencies also regulate the environmental impact of businesses, including issues such as air quality, water quality, and waste disposal. For example, the number of local air quality boards is increasing, as is their activism in maintaining or improving air pollution in their locale, with a particular focus on businesses.

Local business licenses: In addition to state or federal licenses where applicable, almost all businesses will need a license from the local government (city or county) to lawfully operate within their jurisdictions. These local licenses are typically very easy to obtain and require paying a fee.

Health permit: If you’ll be preparing food as part of your business, you’ll need to get permits from the county to do so.

Building permits: If you want to remodel or build a new space, you must get building permits from local agencies to ensure safety and to confirm that the remodeling or new space conforms to local ordinances. Depending on the type of work that’s being done, you may also need permits for plumbing, electrical, and heat or A/C work. Be sure to consult with a licensed, experienced contractor to determine what types of permits you’ll need as well as how much it will cost to get your business up to local requirements.

Zoning: A zoning permit demonstrates that the location of your business is approved by the city or county for your business’ usage. Zoning laws are locale specific, and can vary even from block to block. The laws regulate things like the type of business that is allowed in an area, waste disposal, the size and placement of signs, and even the appearance of the store front (if, for example, you’re in a historic district). If your specific location isn’t zoned for your type of business and you’ve signed a lease, you have trouble on your hands. So before signing a lease, be sure to confirm that the area is zoned for your usage and that the lease accurately reflects the type of business.

Business License Lawyer Free Consultation

When you need help with your business licensing in Utah, please call Ascent Law for your free business law consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC
4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Behind on your mortgage?

Should You Extend Credit To Business Customers?

Don’t Trust Divorce Information On The Internet

Utah Law on Returning a Car

Divorce In Your 20s

Child Custody Summer Break

Share this Article

Michael Anderson

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.