Category Archives: Real Estate Law

Real Estate Salt Lake City

Real Estate Salt Lake City

Are уоu in thе рrосеѕѕ оf buying оr selling rеаl еѕtаtе in Salt Lаkе Citу?

Dо уоu have ԛuеѕtiоnѕ оr соnсеrnѕ аbоut соntrасtѕ, ѕаlеѕ оr lеаѕе аgrееmеntѕ, titles, еаѕеmеntѕ оr liens?

Dо уоu need assistance with dосumеntаtiоn, nеgоtiаting tеrmѕ, inѕресtiоnѕ оr аррrаiѕаlѕ, rеѕоlving title inѕurаnсе, environmental issues, or fоrесlоѕurеѕ?

Find hеlр with estate Lаwуеrѕ in Sаlt Lake City.

Estate Lawyers in Salt Lаkе City Lawyers оffеrѕ a ѕtаndаrd, comprehensive dirесtоrу of ассrеditеd rеаl estate attorneys whо’vе attained a high-dеgrее of рееr rесоgnitiоn аnd рrоfеѕѕiоnаl achievement in commercial and rеѕidеntiаl rеаl estate trаnѕасtiоnѕ.

Regardless оf сirсumѕtаnсе, use estate Lawyers in Sаlt Lаkе Citу to hire a lосаl rеаl еѕtаtе lаwуеr tоdау.

Arе уоu ѕеаrсhing for a tор rеаl estate lаwуеr in Salt Lаkе City, Utаh?

Through еѕtаtе Lаwуеrѕ in Sаlt Lаkе Citу dirесtоrу, we indеx attorneys whо practice ԛuаlitу and еxсеllеnсе in their wоrk. It iѕ еаѕу tо brоwѕе rеаl еѕtаtе аttоrnеу liѕtingѕ in уоur immediate аrеа, ѕеаrсh for a specific individual rеfеrrеd by a friеnd, оr ѕtаrt nаrrоwing уоur search bу practice area.

Did уоu find individuals who intеrеѕt you? Learn more bу exploring thеir рrоfilеѕ. There уоu will find a rеаl estate аttоrnеу’ѕ contact, education, and biоgrарhiсаl infоrmаtiоn to supplement уоur research. Whеrе роѕѕiblе, оur рrоfilеѕ will аlѕо include linkѕ to a real еѕtаtе lаwуеr’ѕ personal biоgrарhу, firm wеbѕitе, аnd other rеlеvаnt infоrmаtiоn tо consider.

Arе you rеаdу tо take action? Our рrоfilе’ѕ соntасt form iѕ simple tо uѕе and makes it easy tо connect with a Salt Lаkе Citу, Utаh lawyer аnd seek legal аdviсе.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Utah Workers Compensation The Important Distinction Between Accident And Disease

What You Need To Know About Accounting Malpractice Lawsuits

what To Do If You Are Damaged By legal Malpractice

Business Lawyers

Estate Planning Lawyer

Divorce Lawyer and Family Law Attorneys

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Real Estate Lawyer In Sandy Utah

Real Estate Lawyer In Sandy Utah

Transactions invоlving рrореrtу can bе quite соmрlеx аnd уоu might need a rеаl еѕtаtе lаwуеr tо hеlр уоu mаkе ѕеnѕе from thе trаnѕасtiоn рrосеѕѕ аnd the dеtаilѕ invоlvеd in thе same. Legal transactions nееd tо bе mаnаgеd carefully ѕо that bоth рrореrtу ѕеllеrѕ аnd buуеrѕ gеt thе bеѕt frоm thе рrосеѕѕеѕ аnd this is whаt lawyers ѕресiаlizing in thiѕ fiеld саn hеlр уоu with. Thеу lаwуеrѕ саn handle a numbеr оf services on your bеhаlf аѕ fаr as the рrореrtу trаnѕасtiоnѕ gо whеthеr thеу аrе individual house рurсhаѕing nееdѕ or соmmеrсiаl nееdѕ, residential dеvеlорmеntѕ to induѕtriаl dеvеlорmеntѕ.

Rеѕidеntiаl real estate lаwуеr

Thе buуing оr ѕеlling оf a home iѕ a vеrу imроrtаnt process thаt оught tо be handled in thе most professional wау роѕѕiblе. If уоu are buуing, then you knоw thаt it iѕ a hugе invеѕtmеnt оn уоur раrt and thеrе is nееd to еnѕurе that еvеrуthing works out smoothly frоm bеginning to еnd and уоu get genuine trаnѕасtiоnѕ and deals in the еnd. Aѕ a ѕеllеr, you аlѕо want to еnjоу a ѕmооth process dеаling only with gеnuinеlу intеrеѕtеd buyers to make thе рrосеѕѕ seamless. A rеѕidеntiаl real еѕtаtе lawyer саn hеlр bоth hоmе ѕеllеrѕ аnd buyers with рrореrtiеѕ ѕuсh аѕ nеw hоmеѕ, rеѕаlе hоmеѕ аnd соndоminiumѕ. Aраrt from ѕuсh sales, a good lаwуеr can hеlр you ѕесurе the rеfinаnсing that уоu nееd аnd mоrtgаgеѕ for the рrореrtу you аrе intеrеѕtеd in.

Commercial real еѕtаtе lawyer

Lеgаl ѕеrviсеѕ аrе juѕt аѕ imроrtаnt to commercial rеаl еѕtаtе аѕ thеу аrе tо rеѕidеntiаl рrореrtу. Thiѕ tуре оf lawyer саn соmе through fоr lеndеrѕ аnd tеnаntѕ, landlords, buyers аnd ѕеllеrѕ to оffеr thе bеѕt ѕоlutiоnѕ аnd сhооѕе thе mоѕt аррrорriаtе рrосеѕѕ fоr thе соmmеrсiаl trаnѕасtiоnѕ tо tаkе рlасе. Thе lаwуеr can help уоu in a variety оf аrеаѕ аѕ fаr аѕ thе соmmеrсiаl рrореrtу gоеѕ inсluding the following.

• Sаlеѕ аnd рurсhаѕеѕ оf the property whеrе thе lawyer еnѕurеѕ laws аrе followed аnd gеnuinе buуеrѕ are hooked with gеnuinе sellers or landlords with gеnuinе tenants.

• Finаnсing thаt iѕ needed fоr the соmmеrсiаl property whеthеr уоu аrе buуing оr ѕеlling so thаt уоu can gеt thе bеѕt finаnсiаl tеrmѕ frоm уоur lеndеr.

• Nеgоtiаtiоnѕ whether thеу are bеtwееn уоu аnd thе buyer or уоu аnd the ѕеllеr or thе lаndlоrd. Whаtеvеr the соmmеrсiаl process саllѕ fоr, you саn bе sure thаt уоur lаwуеr will hаndlе the nеgоtiаtiоnѕ рrоfеѕѕiоnаllу аnd within the lаw for уоu.

• A commercial rеаl еѕtаtе lаwуеr саn аlѕо help with leases and subleases of соmmеrсiаl рrореrtу аnd help уоu with lеаѕе rеviеw tо ensure thаt the terms аrе rеаѕоnаblе аnd wоrthwhilе.

• Titlе еxаminаtiоnѕ саn nеvеr bе overlooked in аnу соmmеrсiаl rеаl еѕtаtе рrосеѕѕ and the lаwуеr will help уоu with titlе аnd liеn searches ѕо thаt you gеt dеаlѕ thаt аrе indееd real and wоrth thе еffоrtѕ you are putting in.

• The lаwуеr can also hеlр you сrеаtе shared and jоint оwnеrѕhiрѕ to thе соmmеrсiаl рrореrtу undеr terms that are bеnеfiсiаl for both parties invоlvеd. Whеn a lawyer is involved you knоw thаt you gеt a fаir share оf the оwnеrѕhiр.

If уоu аrе ѕеlling уоur property, уоu muѕt find a real еѕtаtе lаwуеr tо bе еԛuiрреd with precise lеgаl ѕuрроrt tо hаndlе lеgаl iѕѕuеѕ involved in the sale. Buуеrѕ арроint their оwn lawyer, so mаkе ѕurе thаt you hаvе rеinfоrсеd уоur legal роѕitiоn with аn еxреriеnсеd аnd proficient real еѕtаtе lаwуеr or attorney. When уоu аrе ѕеаrсhing fоr a lawyer, you muѕt check оut hiѕ рrоfilе, cases hаndlеd аnd resolved by him, hiѕ credentials, рrоfilе оf thе lаw firm in whiсh hе iѕ рrасtiсing and many mоrе factors. Thе еаѕiеѕt wау tо look fоr a best rеаl еѕtаtе lawyer wоuld bе tо gо through оnlinе real еѕtаtе lawyer sites, rаthеr thаn lооking аrоund in уоur viсinitу. Chесking trасk rесоrdѕ аnd credentials оf a lаwуеr bесоmеѕ easy tаѕk thrоugh websites оf thе lаw firmѕ аnd individuаl lеgаl соnѕultаntѕ.

ROLE PROPERTY SELLER’S LAWYER

Although thеrе iѕ nо distinctive funсtiоn оr jоb dеfinеd fоr a lаwуеr taking саrе of lеgаl iѕѕuеѕ in the ѕаlе of a property, ѕuсh a lаwуеr usually реrfоrmѕ the fоllоwing tasks to hеlр уоu in рrореrtу ѕаlеѕ –
1. He/She will drаft аnd rеviеw ѕаlеѕ contract
2. Enѕurе title оf thе рrореrtу аnd thе dосumеntѕ реrtаining to thе property аrе properly included in thе ѕаlеѕ
3. Rеviѕе mоrtgаgе information аnd rе-саlсulаtе trаnѕасtiоn to еnѕurе thаt thоѕе are соrrесt
4. Rеviѕе tax billѕ related to thе рrореrtу
5. Adjustment of dаtеѕ fоr utilitу соѕtѕ, соndоminium соѕtѕ оr muniсiраlitу соѕtѕ
6. Assessment of the аmоunt оf duе refunds, if any
7. Drаfting ѕtаtеmеnt fоr аdjuѕtmеnt
8. Drаfting trаnѕfеr dееdѕ
9. Tаking саrе whеthеr thеir сliеntѕ are аblе tо dеlivеr titlе tо thе buуеr, when the sale iѕ сlоѕеd.

Documentation By A Rеаl Eѕtаtе Lаwуеr To Hiѕ Cliеntѕ

Aѕ a seller, you аrе required tо kеер ready ѕоmе еѕѕеntiаl dосumеntѕ if are аbоut to find a rеаl estate lawyer. Fоllоwing are thе documents уоur lаwуеr would rеԛuirе –
– Lаtеѕt tаx bill iѕѕuеd on уоur рrореrtу
– Lаѕt уеаr’ѕ utilitу bills оn рrореrtу
– Mоrtgаgе details
– One сору of the оffеr accepted bу buуеrѕ
– Trаnѕfеr dосumеntѕ оn the рrореrtу ѕinсе when the property wаѕ purchased
– Additiоnаl rеlеvаnt rесоrdѕ whiсh рrоvе thаt you аrе the оwnеr of the rеlеvаnt рrореrtу.

Fееѕ Chаrgеd Bу Rеаl Estate Lаwуеr

Aѕ уоu сlоѕе a рrореrtу ѕаlе deal, bе prepared with ѕоmе рауmеntѕ. Find a real estate lаwуеr tо tаkе care of thеѕе рауmеntѕ, inсluding real еѕtаtе attorney fееѕ. Yоu muѕt kеер aside a роrtiоn of уоur рrоfit fоr inѕurаnсе, taxes, liеnѕ аnd assessment, escrow сhаrgеѕ оr сhаrgеѕ fоr titlе inѕurаnсе, inspection fееѕ еtс. Your real еѕtаtе lawyer may сhаrgе уоu commission аnd trаnѕасtiоn fееѕ

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Divorce Mediator VS Attorney

Law Lawyer

Preparation And Negotiation Of A Purchase And Sale Agreement

Business Lawyers

Estate Planning Lawyer

Divorce Lawyer and Family Law Attorneys

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Utah Homestead Act

Utah Homestead Act

In certain states, homeowners can take advantage of what’s called a homestead exemption. Basically, a homestead exemption allows a homeowner to protect the value of her principal residence from creditors and property taxes. A homestead exemption also protects a surviving spouse when the other homeowner spouse dies. State homestead exemptions often have four features, including the well-known property-tax exemption on a portion of a home’s assessed value.

Property Taxes

A homeowner’s understanding when it comes to homesteading her property most often has to do with the property-tax exemption. Generally, this advantage of homesteading pertains to shielding a portion of a home’s value from property taxes. Often, a typical homesteading advantage is that it’ll exempt the first $25,000 to $75,000 of a home’s assessed value from all property taxes. With a $50,000 homesteading exemption, you’ll only owe property taxes on the home’s remaining assessed value.

Forced Sale Immunity

With a homestead exemption, your home is shielded from a forced sale to satisfy creditors. For example, the lender financing your automobile can’t force the sale of your home if you default on your auto loan. Before homestead exemptions, creditors could and often did try to seize a homeowner’s property to satisfy all kinds of debts. Homestead exemptions, however, don’t normally shield your home from forced sale in mortgage foreclosures or from defaulted property taxes.

Surviving Spouse Advantages

Utah’s homesteading laws work to protect the homestead interests of surviving spouses by guaranteeing their homesteading rights. State homestead laws vary, but surviving spouses under homestead laws retain the homestead right to their homes for life. For surviving spouses, as long as they use and occupy the homesteaded property, they won’t lose homestead rights. Surviving spouses on homesteaded properties, though, must make any mortgage and other payments due in order to retain their homesteading rights.

Homestead Requirements

In order to declare a homestead on your home, it must be your principal residence. In Utah, homestead exemptions apply only to real property. You won’t be able to declare your house boat or motor home a homestead under certain state’s homesteading laws. Your homestead exemption and its advantages last until you effectively abandon the homestead, too. Commonly, you abandon an old homestead when you declare another home your new homestead.

The Utah Homestead Exemption Amount

Under the Utah exemption system, homeowners may exempt up to $30,000 of their home or other property covered by the homestead exemption. You may use the homestead exemption to protect more than one parcel of land, but you may protect up to one acre only.

Doubling for Married Couples

If you file a joint bankruptcy with your spouse in Utah, you can double the homestead exemption to protect up to $60,000 in your home.

The Scope of the Utah Homestead Exemption

In Utah, the homestead exemption applies to real property, including your home or mobile home. You may also protect water rights that you own, if the water is used for domestic or irrigation purposes. In order to use the $30,000 exemption to protect your home, it must be your primary personal residence. Utah law permits you to protect property that is not your primary personal residence, but if you don’t live in the property, the exemption amount is limited to $5,000. The homestead exemption also applies to sale proceeds for up to one year after the property is sold.

Can You Use the Federal Bankruptcy Exemptions in Utah?

Some states allow bankruptcy filers to use the federal bankruptcy exemptions instead of the state exemptions. Utah is not one of those states. If you reside in Utah, you must use the state exemptions.

Homestead Declarations

In Utah, you must file a homestead declaration (a form filed with the county recorder’s office to put on record your right to a homestead exemption) in order to claim the homestead exemption. Contact your county recorder for information on how to file a homestead declaration. Refer to the Utah Code Section 78B-5-504 for the information you are required to include in your homestead declaration.

Other Information About the Utah Homestead Exemption

In Utah, you cannot use the homestead exemption to protect your property from debts due to property taxes or assessments, purchase (such as a mortgage), child support, or liens that you allowed against your property by mutual contract. Homestead exemptions work in two primary ways: flat-dollar exemptions or percentage exemptions.
A flat-dollar homestead exemption reduces the taxable value of your home by a set amount, like $25,000 or $50,000. This style of homestead exemption has a greater impact on people with lower-value homes, as a $50,000 exemption on a $150,000 home is a much greater percentage than the same exemption on a $500,000 home. Percentage exemptions, on the other hand, reduce the taxable value of a home by a certain percentage, like 15% or 40%. This has a bigger impact on homeowners with higher-value properties.

Homestead Tax Exemption Example

Homestead tax exemptions reduce the taxable value of your home, meaning you pay less to the government. Here’s how it works: If your home is worth $200,000, and your local property tax rate is 1%, then you’d normally owe $2,000. But if the homestead exemption is $25,000, then you’re taxed like your property is worth $175,000 meaning you owe just $1,750.

Who’s Eligible For A Homestead Mortgage Exemption?

Homestead exemptions are generally available only on primary residences, rather than second homes or investment properties. Some states offer their homestead exemption applications to all homeowners. Other states restrict their homestead tax exemptions to certain groups, or offer greater homestead exemptions to people in certain categories, such as:
• Elderly people
• People with disabilities
• Veterans, though often restricted to disabled veterans
• Disabled former law enforcement officers and first responders

Types Of Homestead Mortgage Exemptions

Here are a few examples of homestead mortgage exemptions in individual states. (Note: The exemptions listed below are typically not the only ones the state offers.)

The homestead exemption in Utah is included in the state constitution, allowing all homeowners to reduce the taxable value of their home by $7,000. The homestead exemption in New York is for veterans who have served in the U.S. armed forces and are homeowners. Depending on the type of service, several types of exemptions are offered. One of them, the Alternative Veterans Exemption, gives a 15% percentage exemption to veterans who served during a time of war, and is offered in more than 95% of the state’s cities and towns.

The homestead exemption in Texas, called the General Residence Homestead Exemption, allows homeowners to reduce the taxable value of their homes by $25,000 for school district taxes. The state’s Age 65 or Older or Disabled Persons exemption gives people in those categories an additional $10,000 exemption on the same taxes.

The homestead exemption in Florida allows homeowners to exempt up to $50,000 of the taxable value of their homes. The first $25,000 applies to all property taxes, which include school district taxes. Homeowners who have properties valued between $50,000 to $75,000 can deduct up to another $25,000 for non-school property taxes only. The state also exempts quadriplegic people and surviving spouses of first responders killed in the line of duty from all property taxes.
The West Virginia homestead tax exemption allows homeowners to exempt $20,000 in value from property taxes if they are age 65 or older or are permanently and completely disabled.

The Idaho homestead exemption allows people to exempt 50% of the taxable value of their home and up to one acre of land, for a maximum of $100,000 in exemption.

To get a homestead exemption, you typically have to apply for one, and every state has its own process. Typically, you’ll need to fill out a homestead exemption application with your county tax office. Many have application forms on their websites, which will ask you for the type of exemption you’re applying for and information about your property.

If you’re applying based on your age or a disability, you’ll likely have to provide documentation this can include:
• A birth certificate or government-issued identification (such as a driver’s license)
• Disability paperwork from a state or federal agency
• An affidavit from your physician

Homestead exemption applications are usually due by March or April of the year in which you intend to claim the exemption, though it could be as early as Dec. 31 of the year prior. Check with your county tax office. You may only need to file once, with the exemption renewing each year unless you move, but you should check your state’s rules to be sure.

Ways To Lower Your Mortgage Tax Bill

Owning a home can offer numerous tax benefits. If your state doesn’t offer a homestead mortgage exemption, or if you’re looking for other avenues to save money, here are a handful of ways to reduce your property tax bill:

• Appeal your tax assessment. Between 30% to 60% of the taxable properties in the U.S. are overvalued, according to the nonpartisan National Taxpayers Union Foundation. If you don’t agree with your valuation, file an appeal with your local tax authority.

• Deduct your mortgage interest payments. You’re allowed to deduct interest paid on up to $750,000 in home loans on your federal taxes, including the mortgage on your primary residence and a home equity loan or a line of credit used to buy, build or improve your primary residence or a second home.

• Deduct the value of your home office. If you’re self-employed, you may be able to deduct $5 per square foot of your home office on your taxes.

How To Start A Homestead

Moving from a typical modern lifestyle to being a homesteader is often a gradual process. You don’t have to sell everything and move to the country all at once. A lot of people have a romantic and idealized dream of what homesteading would be like.

Step 1: Consider What Homesteading Involves

You should really stop and think about what the day-to-day activities and chores will be like if you decide to become a homesteader. Taking care of crops and livestock, in particular, are time-consuming and physically demanding tasks, and not everyone is cut out for it. If you have a spouse or partner, you also need to make sure they’re 100% on board, and that homesteading is the kind of life that both of you are looking for. You’ll need to sit down and have open and honest discussions about what you’re looking for. If your partner hates the idea of getting their hands dirty, then living a homestead lifestyle will be very difficult for you. You should spend hours and hours learning everything you can about homesteading before you decide to make any kind of commitment. Don’t make a major homesteading decision without having all the facts and knowledge needed. Watch documentaries, read books and fully immerse yourself in the homestead mindset. If you’ve got friends or family who already have a homestead of their own, see if you can spend a few days helping out to get a feel for what the lifestyle is like. And be sure to ask them lots of questions.

Step 2: Set Goals For Yourself

If you followed Step 1 and realized that devoting yourself to taking care of a farm full-time isn’t for you, that’s totally okay. You can still practice homesteading and have a sustainable lifestyle without selling everything and moving to the country. Even in an urban setting you can start a vegetable garden, get a few backyard chickens and begin preserving your own food.

Step 3: Decide Where You Want To Live

Your goals in Step 2 will help decide what size of a property you’ll need. If you plan to have a full-time or part-time job still and just do homesteading as a hobby, then you can probably get by in an urban or semi-rural environment.
If you plan to make homesteading your full-time job and lifestyle, you’ll need enough room to grow all the vegetables and fruit that you need, plus space for cows, sheep, or any other livestock you want. In addition to figuring out how much land you need, you’ll also want to set parameters on the general area you want to live too.

Are you okay living in an ultra remote area, or do you want to be just outside of town? Make sure any land you look at will actually work for the type of homestead lifestyle you’re trying to accomplish. If you’re primarily looking to grow crops, then very sandy or rocky soil will make things more difficult, for example. Don’t forget to factor in travel time. Do you really want to drive 1.5 hours every time you need to pick up something from the grocery store, or go to work every day (if you’re still going to have a job?) Are you okay with the fact that it may take an hour for police or an ambulance to arrive in case of an emergency? Even little things like needing to take a long walk down to your mailbox each day, or driving to your nearest post office once a week, may be more than what you thought you were signing up for. Also avoid the temptation to bite off more than you can chew. You don’t need 100 acres, or even 10, to have the homestead of your dreams.

Some important homestead factors to keep in mind during the planning stage include:

• Water access. Do you have nearby lakes, rivers, or ponds that you can use for water? Is there a well on the property? How much rainfall does the area get per year?

• Land safety. You don’t want to live somewhere that’s prone to drought if you’re growing your own food, and you also don’t want to be near oil fracking sites or other potential health hazards.

• Community. Sometimes the community you’re a part of is just as important as the land you buy. You will need to make friends and network with people in your area. If they have different religious or political views than you, it might be more difficult to fit in with the community, especially in a small village.

• School. If you have kids, is there a school nearby? If not, you may need to home school them.

Step 4: Make A Budget

Having a thoroughly thought-out budget is critical for homesteading, particularly if you’re planning to give up a steady job to become completely self-sufficient. If you’re buying land and property, it’s important not to use all your savings to buy it. Otherwise you won’t have any money left for renovations, improvements, equipment, or other necessary things. If you are giving up a job for a more self-sufficient lifestyle, you’re going to need to think of some ideas to generate income for yourself.

At a bare minimum you’re still likely going to need to pay property taxes, and potentially utilities as well as things like a phone or internet bill. You’re also going to want to have some savings in case of an emergency, such as if your furnace breaks, or a family member gets sick. It’s smart to have multiple streams of income from your homestead. You may try selling wool, milk products, extra produce, as well as things like soap making or other crafts. That way if your crops all die or you find out there’s no demand for one income source, you have something else to fall back on. Obviously you don’t want to spread yourself too thin. But it’s not all that uncommon for homesteaders to have 5 or 10 different products or sources of income.

Step 5: Start Small

You don’t need to wait until you have your dream farm to begin. You can start your journey into homesteading right away. Much of homesteading is a mindset and lifestyle, as opposed to where you live. Whatever your situation is, even if you’re living in an apartment, you can start moving toward a more self-sufficient lifestyle this week. If you have a sunny window, you can start growing your own herbs or lettuce indoors. Got a large backyard that’s not being used to grow much besides grass and weeds? Put in a garden or raised bed next spring and start growing a portion of the vegetables for your household. (Be sure to pick vegetables that you actually enjoy and want to eat regularly!) Have a fireplace that you don’t currently use? Time to clean out your chimney and get some wood, and start using it to reduce your heating bill! Over time you can gradually add more and more projects. Even if you only make one or two small lifestyle changes per year, things will really start to add up over time. You could even start raising chickens or beekeeping in your backyard. Just be sure to check what your local bylaws are to make sure it’s allowed first!
Homesteading is all about what feels right for you. You can define your priorities and do things in whatever order makes the most sense to you. For some people, self-sufficient energy may be a priority so they may want to invest in solar panels right away. Other people may not mind paying for gas and electricity. Some people may want to start raising livestock right away for egg and meat production, while some people may choose to never go down that route due to ethical reasons.

Step 6: Continually Simplify Your Life

Homesteading often goes hand-in-hand with minimalism and living a more frugal lifestyle. A big part of that is getting out of the cycle of always needing the newest and greatest phones, gadgets, trendy clothing, and other things that can suck money out of your bank account but not really offer much value. For homesteaders, less is more, and there’s usually a cheaper and better way to do something. You should be continuously taking an audit of your life to see what things are draining your money, time, and energy, and seeing if you can reduce or completely eliminate them from your life. Adding homesteading to your lifestyle will often require taking some previous things out. Some things might be obvious. Other things may be more subtle and take more insight to figure out how to reduce or remove them from your life.

Step 7: Learn To Preserve Food

There are tons of different ways to preserve food, but the idea of food preservation in general is becoming a bit of a dying art. Even picking up one food preservation skill like canning, pickling, freezing, cold storage, dehydrating, or smoking can help cut down on your food costs. If you’re growing your own fruits and vegetables, then learning to preserve food is an absolute must. You’re likely going to have far more food at the end of the season than you know what to do with. And if you can’t preserve it, then most of it will end up going to waste. You’ll need to find a way to keep your produce from spoiling so that you can keep your family fed all throughout the winter months. Even if you don’t grow your own food, learning to preserve will allow you to buy food in season when it’s cheapest and most ripe, and continue eating it all year round. You probably know someone who has some extra canning supplies that you can borrow just to try it out. Even if you need to buy your own canning jars or a food dehydrator, they will often pay for themselves within the first one or two uses.

Starting to use cold storage is as easy as finding a cool, dark place in your basement or under your home where you can store things.

Step 8: Make Friends With Other Homesteaders

Homesteading is often associated with hermits or people who aren’t very sociable. But the truth is that many homesteaders are very friendly and eager to share what they know with anyone who’s interested. Having a homesteading buddy who is more experienced than you can really help if you have questions or concerns at any step along the way. They’ll know about the weather, growing conditions, laws, and lots of other useful information that you’ll need, because they’ve likely been through it all themselves already. And don’t discount having the moral support and someone who lives the same lifestyle as you being there, when everyone else is telling you that you’re crazy. Networking with other homesteaders makes sense from a material perspective too. If you’ve grown too many peppers and your friend has too many eggs, then it’s easy to barter for what you need. Or you might even set up long-term arrangements with other homesteaders to trade for food and supplies that you don’t necessarily want to produce yourself. You might only need a plow once per year at the start of the season, and it could make more sense to just borrow it from a neighbor as opposed to buying one for yourself.

Free Initial Consultation with a Real Estate Law Firm

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506


Recent Posts

Can I Convert My Chapter 13 To Chapter 7?

Moving And Relocation After Divorce

Lawsuits Against Firearms

Revenge Porn Victim

Structured Product Investment Lawyer

Estate Planning Attorney Farmington Utah

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Capital Improvements

utah real estate tax attorney

All capital improvements to your home are tax deductible. You cannot claim the deduction until you sell it when the cost of additions and other improvements are added to the cost basis of your property. The IRS defines a capital improvement as a home improvement that adds market value to the home prolongs its useful life or adapts it to new uses. Minor repairs and maintenance jobs like changing door locks, repairing a leak or fixing a broken window do not qualify as capital improvements.

Home Additions

New additions to your home are the most obvious capital improvements. Adding a new bedroom, bathroom, garage, porch or even a satellite dish to your home are all valid improvements, according to IRS Publication 523.

Heating and Air Conditioning Systems

You may deduct any costs expended towards the installation of a new heating system, central air-conditioning system, water filtration system, a central humidifier or even a fireplace.

Improvements for the Elderly and Infirm

Declare any improvements that make your home more accessible and useful for elderly or infirm individuals, such as bathroom handrails, stair lifts or ramps.

Outdoor Improvements

Landscaping your garden increases your home’s curb appeal, an excellent way of improving market value. A new driveway, walkway, fence, retaining wall or even swimming pool are all tax deductible.

Plumbing Improvements

Plumbing additions like fitting a new water heater, installing a septic tank or attaching a soft-water filter system are considered permanent improvements to the home, according to the IRS.

Large Remodeling and Repair Projects

Painting your home and ordinary maintenance repairs are not considered capital improvements. However, the IRS may allow you to deduct them if you can prove they are part of a larger project, like remodeling a kitchen. Extensive repairs to your home after a fire, flood or other serious incident are also deductible.

Improvements to a Business

All repairs, additions and improvements to a property used in connection with a business, or one that produces income, such as a rental, are tax deductible, regardless of whether they are capital improvements. The businessperson must declare the expense as depreciation to recover the cost. It’s no secret that finishing your basement will increase your home’s value. What you may not know is that you may be eligible for tax breaks for capital improvements on your home when you sell. Tax rules let you add capital improvement expenses to the cost basis of your home. Why is that a big deal? Because a higher cost basis lowers the total profit capital gain, in IRS speak that in some cases you may be required to pay taxes on. In other words, you might have a tax benefit coming. Here’s how to know what home improvements can pay off at tax time.

The tax benefit doesn’t come into play for everyone. The large majority of home sellers will never have to pay taxes on the profits they make on their homes because of a widely available exemption on the first $250,000 of profit for single filers ($500,000 for joint filers). If you move frequently, maybe it’s not worth the effort to track capital improvement expenses. But if you plan to live in your house a long time or make lots of upgrades, saving receipts could be a smart move.

What Home Improvements Are Tax Deductible?

Some examples of eligible home improvements include:

• New bathroom

• New addition

• Basement finishing

• Master suite addition

Although you may consider all the work you do to your home an improvement, the IRS looks at things differently. A capital improvement increases your home’s value, while a non-eligible repair just returns something to its original condition. According to the IRS, capital improvements have to last for more than one year and add value to your home, prolong its life, or adapt it to new uses.

There are limitations. The improvements must still be evident when you sell. So if you put in wall-to-wall carpeting 10 years ago and then replaced it with hardwood floors five years ago, you can’t count the carpeting as a capital improvement. Repairs, like painting your house or fixing sagging gutters, don’t count. The IRS describes repairs as things that are done to maintain a home’s good condition without adding value or prolonging its life. There can be a fine line between a capital improvement and a repair. For instance, if you replace a few shingles on your roof, it’s a repair. If you replace the entire roof, it’s a capital improvement. Same goes for windows. If you replace a broken window pane, repair. Put in a new window, capital improvement.

How Capital Improvements Affect Your Gain

To figure out how improvements affect your tax bill, you first have to know your cost basis. The cost basis is the amount of money you spent to buy or build your home including all the costs you paid at the closing: fees to lawyers, survey charges, transfer taxes, and home inspection, to name a few. You should be able to find all those costs on the settlement statement you received at your closing. Next, you’ll need to account for any subsequent capital improvements you made to your home. Let’s say you bought your home for $200,000 including all closing costs. That’s the initial cost basis. You then spent $25,000 to remodel your kitchen. Add those together and you get an adjusted cost basis of $225,000. Now, suppose you’ve lived in your home as your main residence for at least two out of the last five years. Any profit you make on the sale will be taxed as a long-term capital gain. You sell your home for $475,000. That means you have a capital gain of $250,000 (the $475,000 sale price minus the $225,000 cost basis). You’re single, so you get the exemption for the $250,000 profit. Here’s where it gets interesting. Had you not factored in the money you spent on the kitchen remodel, you’d be facing a tax bill on that $25,000 gain that exceeded the exemption.

By keeping receipts and adjusting your basis, you’ve saved about $3,800 in taxes based on the 15% tax rate on capital gains. Well worth taking an hour a month to organize your home improvement receipts, don’t you think?

The top cap gains rate for most home sellers is 15%. For sellers in the highest tax brackets, such as 37%, the cap gains rate is 20%. Some situations can lower your tax basis, thus increasing your risk of facing a tax bill when you sell. Consult a tax adviser. Examples include:

• If you use the actual cost method and take depreciation on a home office, you have to subtract those deductions from your basis.

• Any depreciation available to you because you rented your house works the same way.

• You also have to subtract subsidies from utility companies for making energy-related home improvements or energy-efficiency tax credits you’ve received.

• If you bought your home using the federal tax credit for first-time home buyers, you’ll have to deduct that from your basis too.

Determining Your Home’s Tax Basis

Basis is the amount your home (or other property) is worth for tax purposes. When you sell your home, your gain (profit) or loss for tax purposes is determined by subtracting its basis on the date of sale from the sales price (plus sales expenses, such as real estate commissions). The larger your basis, the smaller your profit will be, reducing your tax liability. If you sell your home for less than its basis, you’ll have a loss. However, losses incurred on the sale of a personal residence are not deductible. One confusing thing about basis is that it can change over time. When this occurs, your basis is called “adjusted basis.” To determine the amount of your basis, you begin with your starting basis and then add or subtract any required adjustments.

Cost Basis of a Property

If you’ve purchased your home, your starting point for determining the property’s basis is what you paid for it. Logically enough, this is called its cost basis. Your cost basis is the purchase price, plus certain other expenses. You use the full purchase price as your starting point, regardless of how you pay for the property with cash or a loan. If you buy property and take over an existing mortgage, you use the amount you pay for the property, plus the amount that still must be paid on the mortgage. Certain fees and other expenses you pay when buying a home are added to your basis in the property. Most of these costs should be listed on the closing statement you receive after escrow on your property closes. However, some might not be listed there, so be sure to check your records to see if you’ve made any other payments that should be added to your property’s basis. These include real estate taxes owed by the seller that you pay settlement fees and other costs such as title insurance.

When Cost Is Not the Property’s Basis

You cannot use cost as the starting basis for a home that you received as an inheritance or gift. The basis of property you inherit is usually the property’s fair market value at the time the owner died. Thus, if you hold on to your rental property until death, your heirs will be able to resell it and pay little or no tax the ultimate tax loophole.
Example: Victoria inherits her deceased parents’ home. The property’s fair market value (excluding the land) is $300,000 at the time of her uncle’s death. This is Victoria’s basis. She sells the property for $310,000. Her total taxable profit on the sale is only $10,000 (her profit is the sales price minus the home’s tax basis).
The basis of a home or other property you receive as a gift is its adjusted basis in the hands of the gift giver when the gift was made. If you build your home yourself, your starting basis is the cost of construction. The cost includes the cost of materials, equipment, and labor. However, you may not add the cost of your own labor to the property’s basis. Add the interest you pay on construction loans during the construction period, but deduct interest you pay before and after construction as an operating expense.

Adjusted Basis of a Property

Your basis in property is not fixed. It changes over time to reflect the true amount of your investment. This new basis is called the adjusted basis because it reflects adjustments from your starting basis.

Reductions in Basis

Your starting basis in your home must be reduced by any items that represent a return of your cost. These include:

• depreciation allowed or allowable if you used part of your home for business or rental purposes

• the amount of any insurance or other payments you receive as the result of a casualty or theft loss

• gain you posed from the sale of a previous home

• any deductible casualty loss not covered by insurance, and

• any amount you receive for granting an easement.

Increases in Basis

You must increase the basis of any property by:

• the cost of any additions or improvements

• amounts spent to restore property after it is damaged or lost due to theft, fire, flood, storm, or other casualty

• tax credits you received after 2005 for home energy improvements

• the cost of extending utility service lines to the property, and

• legal fees relating to the property, such as the cost of defending and perfecting title.

In addition, assessments for items that tend to increase the value of your property, such as streets and sidewalks, must be added to its basis. For example, if your city installs curbing on the street in front of your rental house, and assesses you for the cost, you must add the assessment to the basis of your property. The most common way homeowners increase their basis is to make home improvements. Improvements include any work done that adds to the value of your home, increases its useful life, or adapts it to new uses. These include room additions, new bathrooms, decks, fencing, landscaping, wiring upgrades, walkways, driveway, kitchen upgrades, plumbing upgrades, new roofs. However, adjusted basis does not include the cost of improvements that were later removed from the home. For example, if you installed a new chain-link fence 15 years ago and then replaced it with a redwood fence, the cost of the old fence is no longer part of your home’s adjusted basis.

Example: Jane purchased her home for $200,000 and sold it ten years later for $300,000. While she owned the home, she made $50,000 worth of improvements, including a new bathroom and kitchen. These increased her basis to $250,000. She also received $10,000 in insurance payments one year to reimburse her for storm damage to the house. This payment decreased her basis to $240,000. She subtracts her $240,000 adjusted basis from the $300,000 sales price to determine her gain from the sale—$60,000.

Capital Gains Tax When You Sell Your House at Divorce

Whether and how the capital gains tax affects you during your divorce depends on what you are doing with the house. In general, transfers of property between divorcing spouses are nontaxable. But there are circumstances where the capital gains tax—a tax on profits from sales of property where the gains exceed a certain amount—does apply to transfers that are made as part of your divorce.

If You Sell Together

If you and your spouse sell your house at the time you’re getting divorced, the capital gains tax applies. But you’re entitled to exclude a total of $500,000 of gain from tax if you lived there for two of the five years before the sale. (If either spouse is in the military that five-year period can be extended for up to ten years under some circumstances.) And if you bought the house less than two years ago the exclusion may be reduced.

Buyouts

After a buyout, the selling spouse doesn’t need to worry about capital gains tax because the sale was part of the divorce. But if you buy out your spouse, stay in the house, and later sell the house to a third party, capital gains tax will apply to that sale. You may exclude the first $250,000 of gain as long as you’ve lived there for two years before selling, or meet one of the IRS exceptions to that rule.

Co-Owning the House

For a spouse who continues to own the house but doesn’t live in it, there’s a risk that the $250,000 exclusion might not apply when the house is sold. To avoid losing the exclusion, it’s important to have written documentation of the agreement that called for one spouse to stay in the house and the other to leave but remain a co-owner. If it’s clear that the arrangement was pursuant to a divorce settlement or court order, then the nonresident spouse can still take the exclusion on the basis of the resident Capital gains can be confusing. If you have questions about your basis, whether your gain is over the exclusion amount, or other aspects of capital gains taxes, try looking for the answer in IRS Publication 523, Selling Your Home, or ask your attorney or tax preparer to help you figure it out.

How to Qualify for Home Sale Tax Breaks

There are basic requirements you must meet to qualify for a tax break. Here’s a breakdown of them:

• You must have owned the home you are selling for at least two years. If you’ve owned the home for less time, you do not qualify for the tax break.

• You must have used the home as your primary residence for at least two of the past five years. This means that second homes, such as vacation homes and pure rental properties, will likely not qualify for this tax break.

• You must not have used this tax break for the sale of another home within the past two years. This means that if you are trying to sell multiple properties, the tax break can only apply to one of your properties.

Qualifying for a Reduced Home Sale Exclusion

A reduced exclusion allows you to claim part of the tax break, even if you don’t meet all of the above requirements. If you have only lived in your home for one year, for instance, you could be exempt for just $125,000 of any profit you make from selling your home. You must have a valid reason to qualify for a reduced exclusion, though. Valid reasons include changes in employment, changes in health or any other unforeseen circumstance that makes it necessary for you to sell your home sooner than anticipated.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Family Law Attorney Taylorsville Utah

Getting Probate

Will My Spouse Pay My Attorney Fees

Utah Father’s Rights Must Act Fast

Estate Planning Attorney Centerville Utah

Should You Separate First Before Divorce?

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Military Real Estate Lawyers

Military Real Estate Lawyer

Buying a home will probably be the largest and most significant purchase you will make in your life. It also involves the law of real property, which is unique and raises special legal issues and problems not present in other transactions. A real estate lawyer is trained to handle these problems and has the most experience to deal with them.

Making a Purchase

In the typical home purchase, the seller enters into a contract with a real estate agent, usually in writing. When the broker finds a potential buyer, they conduct the negotiations and most often act as an intermediary (the go-between). Once an informal agreement is reached, the buyer and seller enter into a formal written contract for the sale of the new home. This is known as the purchase agreement.

The home buying process then follows the following steps:
• The buyer obtains a commitment for financing.
• A title search is conducted to satisfy the lender and the buyer.
• Finally, the property is transferred from the seller to the buyer, and the seller receives the purchase price bargained for in the contract.

The process seems simple, but without a lawyer, the consequences may be more disastrous than purchasing a car that turns out to be a lemon or a stock investment that was unwise.

Avoid Vague or Unclear Terms In Your Real Estate Contract

A lawyer can help you avoid some common problems with a home purchase or sale. For example, a seller may sign a brokerage agreement that does not deal with a number of legal issues. This happens quite often as realtors often use standard forms, expecting that they will cover all situations. In the absence of an agreement to the contrary, the seller may become liable to pay a brokerage commission even if a sale does not occur, or they may be forced to pay more than one brokerage commission. If the agreement allows the seller the right to negotiate on their own behalf, however, you may avoid this potential problem. It is thus recommended that the seller have the advice and guidance of an attorney with respect to a brokerage agreement. Even if the agreement is a standard form, its terms should be explained to the seller and revised, if necessary.

Consider a Real Estate Lawyer Consultation

Even if a lawyer is not needed during the course of negotiations, both the buyer and seller may want to consult with a lawyer to answer important legal questions, such as the tax consequences of the real estate transaction. The tax consequences may be of critical importance to a home seller. For example, the income tax consequences of a sale, particularly if the seller makes a large profit, may be considerable. An attorney can advise whether the seller can take advantage of tax provisions allowing for exclusion of capital gains in certain circumstances.

Real Estate Purchase Agreements

The purchase agreement is the single most important document in the transaction. Although standard printed forms are useful, a lawyer is helpful in explaining the forms and making changes and additions to reflect the home buyer’s and the seller’s desires.

There are many issues that may need to be addressed in the purchase agreement, such as:
• If the property has changed or if there has been an addition to the property, was it done lawfully?
• If the buyer has plans to change the property, can that be done lawfully?
• What happens if a buyer has a home inspector inspect the property and termites, asbestos, radon, or lead-based paint is found?
• What if the property is found to contain hazardous waste?
• What are the legal outcomes if the closing does not take place, and what happens to the down payment?
• Will the down payment be held in escrow by a lawyer according to the escrow instructions? How is the payment to be made?

Is the closing conditioned upon the buyer obtaining financing?

Most buyers finance a substantial portion of the purchase price for a home with a mortgage loan from a lending institution. The purchase agreement should contain a carefully worded provision that is subject to the buyer obtaining a commitment for financing.

Real Estate Title Search

After the purchase agreement is signed, it is necessary to establish the state of the seller’s title to the property to satisfy the buyer and the financial institution. Generally, a title search is ordered from an abstract or title insurance company. In some states, title insurance is not typical. In these cases, an attorney is essential to review the status of title and give an opinion of title in lieu of a title policy. Assuming you are in an area where title insurance is customary, an attorney can help review the title search and explain the title exceptions as to what is not insured. They will also determine whether the legal description is correct and whether there are problems with adjoining owners or prior owners. In addition, an attorney can explain the effect of easements and agreements or restrictions imposed by a prior owner, and whether there are any legal restrictions which will undermine your ability to sell the property. The title search does not tell the buyer or seller anything about existing and prospective zoning. A lawyer can explain whether zoning prohibits a two-family home, or whether planned improvements violate zoning ordinances.

Real Estate Title Closing

The closing is the most important event in the purchase and sale transaction. The deed and other closing papers must be prepared. At the closing, title passes from seller to buyer, who pays the balance of the purchase price. Frequently, this balance is paid in part from the proceeds of a mortgage loan. A closing statement should be prepared prior to the closing indicating the debits and credits to the buyer and seller. An attorney, here, becomes helpful in explaining the nature, amount, and fairness of closing costs. Once the deed and other closing documents are signed, an attorney can make sure that these documents are appropriately executed and explained to everyone.

Importance of Having a Lawyer During Closing

The closing process can be confusing and complex to the buyer and seller. Those present at the closing often include the buyer and seller, their respective attorneys, the title closer (representative of the title company), an attorney for any lending institution, and the real estate broker. There may also be last-minute disputes about delivering possession and personal property or the adjustment of various costs, such as fuel and taxes. If you are the only person there without a lawyer, your rights may be at risk. A broker generally serves the seller, and the lender is obtained by the buyer. Both want to see the deal go through since that is how they will get paid. However, neither can provide legal counsel. If you want peace of mind when making one of the biggest purchases of your lifetime, you should consider speaking with an experienced real estate attorney.

Military Attorney and Lawyers

A military lawyer’s job is similar to a civilian lawyer in their day-to-day duties. Representing clientele under jurisdiction of military courts and law is the primary difference. The military attorney works exclusively with military personnel and may represent them in civil and criminal cases. Each Military lawyer may work within any branch of the Navy, Army, Marines, or Air force even though each branch has their own Judge Advocate Generals (also known as JAGs). Military personnel may contact any military legal assistance office if they need legal representation. A Jag practices law in a Military court including court-martial, military review, Military Court of Inquiry, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. A Jag will go through the same educational process of a civilian lawyer. Military attorneys will need to know general law as well as military law. They can either become a JAG after entering the military, or they may enter the military with the JAG requirements completed.

The role of a military attorney is as broad as that of a civilian attorney. They will participate in matters of both civil and criminal nature. One of the primary differences of a military court is the military tribunal that deals with enemies during wartime.

Some of the roles of the military lawyer include:
• Advising military clients brought before the courts.
• Handling the legal discipline of military personnel.
• Drafting and preparing legal documents.
• Creating and maintaining military handbooks.
• Preparing a client for trial.
• Advising commanders on international law, military law, and civilian law.
• Acting as council for court-martial.

A military attorney must possess an excellent understanding of all parts of civil and military law. Their advice and actions not only affect individuals, it may also reflect on their branch of service and the United States Government. They must be able to work under pressure while maintaining a cool decorum. They will need to have excellent communication skills both in the courtroom and out. Their ability to represent a broad range of clientele, from a young enlisted soldier to a high-ranking commander, requires they are comfortable communicating across the ranks.

Examples of Cases for Military Lawyers

The military court, while similar to civilian court, also differs. Therefore, the cases that a military lawyer participates in may be different.

A few examples are:
• Offenses- Military rules provide a variety of offenses that military personnel may be charged with. While many of the criminal offenses are similar to civilian courts such as murder and theft, the military oversees special offenses unique to the armed forces. These offenses include: desertion, murder in combat, and insubordination.
• Court-Martial- One of the prevailing outcomes of any criminal proceeding against military personnel is a Court-Martial. If a person is found guilty of a crime, a court-martial is likely. The military attorney may represent the offending party or the military branch they serve.
• Landlord Tenant Disputes- Moving is one of the hallmarks of military life. As such, it is not uncommon for military personnel to find the need to hire an attorney in a landlord-tenant dispute. While military lawyers do not represent clients dealing with other civil issues such as divorce or child custody, they will represent a military client in a landlord-tenant case.
The job outlook of a military lawyer will vary. Each branch of the military may have different needs. For instance, the Marines are a small branch of the service and serve as part of the Navy. The Marines may not need as many legal personnel than the Army. Speaking with a recruiting officer may offer insight into the possibilities of a career as a lawyer in the military. The salary of a military attorney is set by rank and years in the military. A new attorney may start out at $38,000 a year. As they move up the ranks they can earn six-digit incomes. Regardless of your age, or the size and complexity of your estate, an estate plan can accomplish the following:
• Identify the family members and other loved ones that you wish to receive your property after your death.
• Ensure that your property will be transferred to those you have identified, as quickly and with as few legal hurdles as possible.
• Minimize the amount of taxes that will need to be paid in order for your property to pass to others after your death.
• Avoid the time and costs associated with the probate process by utilizing estate planning devices like living trusts and “payable on death” bank accounts.
• Dictate the kinds of life-prolonging medical care you wish to receive should you be unable to make your wishes known when the time comes.
• Set forth the kind of funeral arrangements you would like, and how related expenses are to be paid.

Military Real Estate Lawyer Free Consultation

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Home Foreclosure In Utah

Bitter Divorce

Guardianships In Utah

Shoplifting And Theft Attorney

Utah Divorce Lawyers For Dads

Can I File A New Bankruptcy Case?

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Homeowner Liability For Trespasser Injuries

Homeowner Liability For Trespasser Injuries

It’s late at night, and a robber is staking out your property for a heist. You’re in bed early and the car is in the garage, perhaps giving the impression that no one’s home. But as the would-be robber creeps toward the back door, stepping onto the tarp covering a deep hole you were digging for your new hot tub, he suddenly falls and breaks his leg. You didn’t mark the area or provide lighting, but you also didn’t expect someone to be creeping around your yard late at night. Question is, are you liable for his injuries? In this particular case, probably not. But sometimes homeowners are in fact liable for trespasser injuries.

What is a Trespasser and When are You Liable for Their Injuries on Your Property?

A trespasser is someone who is not authorized to be on the property at issue. Landowners are not obligated to protect trespassers who enter their property without permission, but they cannot willfully injure them. Also, if a landowner knows — or should know — that there are frequent trespassers on his/her property, he or she will be liable for any injuries caused by an unsafe condition on the property if:

1. The condition is one the owner created or maintained;

2. The condition was likely to cause death or serious bodily harm;

3. The condition was such that the owner had reason to believe trespassers would not discover it (before becoming injured by it); and

4. The owner failed to exercise reasonable care to warn trespassers of the condition and the risk presented.

Trespassing Children and Liability for Injuries

A different rule applies where trespassing children are involved. In the case of children who wander onto property without authorization, property owners do have a duty to ensure that their property is safe. The logic behind this exception is that children are sometimes naïve to dangers on property, and could in fact be lured to dangerous conditions such as a swimming pool, an abandoned well, or heavy machinery. These potential hazards are referred to as “attractive nuisances,” since a reasonable person should know that such conditions were likely to attract children.

Thus, a property owner has a duty to inspect his/her property to see if there are any potentially dangerous conditions that might attract children and, if there are, act immediately to correct the unsafe condition(s). A property owner may be liable for an injury to a trespassing child if he/she knew, or should have known:

1. Young children were likely to trespass in the area of a dangerous condition on the property that involved an unreasonable risk of bodily harm to children;

2. Young children would not be aware of the risk; and

3. The utility of the condition is small compared to the risk it represents.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

What Happens To A Mortgage After Divorce?

Real Estate Attorney In Utah

Is It Time To Modify Alimony?

February Often Brings Divorce Filings

Beneficiaries Of An Estate

Health Technology Lawyer

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Real Estate Attorney In Utah

Real Estate Attorney In Utah

In Utah, Real Estate can be a complicated business; there are so many details and wrinkles you have to smooth out before you can actually move into a new home. From hiring an agent, to finding that perfect dream home, not to mention the process of financing and making an offer to purchase, finally getting to the contract stage can be time-consuming and complex. Any number of things can go wrong in the process that will make you realize you should speak with a Real Estate Lawyer in Utah. When you do make a formal offer to buy the home you want to buy, you will end up reading and filling out a lot of paperwork specifying the terms and conditions of your offer. Aside from obvious items like the address and purchase price of the property, here are some more nuanced items you should be sure to include in your real estate purchase contract. In legalese, these are called contingencies that are written in to your real estate contract. A residential real estate purchase agreement is a binding contract between a seller and buyer for the ownership transfer of real property. The agreement outlines the terms, such as the sales price and any contingencies leading up to the closing date.

Duties of a Real Estate Attorney

However, real estate transactions often represent the most expensive transaction that a person makes. Spending the extra funds to ensure that the job is done right is often a prudent choice. Real estate lawyers help in the following ways when you are purchasing or selling a home:

Rea Estate Contract Drafting and Review

Real estate lawyers memorialize the terms of the agreement into a formal contract. They can ensure that certain provisions are contained in the contract that protect their client’s interests as well as to make sure that state laws are complied with. They can also address certain issues that may arise, such as purchasing a lease-back by the seller, handling existing tenants, using the property for certain uses in the future and include contingencies to protect the client. Many documents will manifest during the course of a purchase and sale of a home. Lawyers will carefully review all of these documents and not simply take the lender’s word for what the document is stating. If there is any troubling wording or legal issue that arises, he or she can address these concerns. Many home sales are based on a number of important contingencies. A seller may want to secure a new home and make the sale contingent on this ability, or the buyer may want to make the sale of his or her own home contingent on the transaction. There may be other contingencies as well that can be included in the purchase agreement.

Drafting Amendments

There may be changes made in the original agreement based on new information. It may have taken longer than expected for certain stages of the process to be completed. There may be changes based on the home inspection and agreements reached regarding any defects. A natural disaster may strike, causing damage to the property. Real estate lawyers can draft such amendments to keep the purchase agreement intact but to account for this new information.

Reviewing Liens

A real estate lawyer often conducts a title search on a property to determine if there are any encumbrances against it or anything that is clouding the title. This search helps clarify whether the seller has the legal right to sell the property and whether there is anything that may block the sale. For example, the seller may be required to pay off a lien or judgment before selling the home. A real estate lawyer can also secure proof that the judgment or lien has been satisfied.

Transferring Property

A real estate lawyer helps to draft deeds to effectuate the transfer of real estate. Additionally, he or she can review any contracts related to the real estate transaction that have to do with a corporation, partnership or trust so that no terms of the charter agreement are breached. Without the proper legal protocol, the opposing party may be sued if the agreement is violated. When one or more parties are corporations, trusts, or partnerships, the contract preparation and the ensuing negotiations are complicated. An attorney understands these different types of business arrangements and their legal boundaries within your state’s law. The attorney will ensure that the contract is consistent with the law and the partnerships, trusts, or corporation’s charter agreements.

Fulfilling Additional Legal Requirements

The purchase of certain properties may require additional steps. For example, there may be special requirements if a home is considered historical property. If a property is on wetlands and building permits are not secured, the entire structure may need to be rebuilt. If the property is ultimately going to be used for a commercial use, certain zoning restrictions may apply.

Dealing With Real Estate Discrimination

Lawyers can certainly help if you face discrimination during the home buying process. Even though most real estate lawyers do not specialize in that area, they will probably know an attorney who does. However, don’t let anyone convince you that you need to have lots of money or a high-priced legal team to respond to discrimination. Laws exist to protect everyone, regardless of income.

Real Estate Disclosures

State laws dictate what types of information must be disclosed about a property. Real estate lawyers can help requests these disclosures as well as prepare the disclosures if they are representing the seller. Without a real estate lawyer, the likelihood of being sued regarding a disclosure increases. A real estate lawyer can also be sure to put a home inspection clause in the buyer’s documents so that any unknown defects are realized before the transaction concludes. A good real estate lawyer can also review home inspections and other disclosures to help you spot any potential problems with the home before it becomes an issue down the road. You definitely do not want to be tricked into thinking that the home is safe and secure when there are actually serious problems that the previous owner hid from you.

Recording

Property law is full of cases involving properties that were purchased but no deed was ever recorded, creating legal nightmares for buyers. A real estate lawyer can ensure that the deed is properly filed and recorded. If a deed is not properly recorded, the buyer may not be considered the legal owner. His or her income and estate taxes may be levied.

Legal Assistance

To best protect their interests, many home buyers and sellers choose to retain the services of a competent real estate lawyer. He or she focuses on protecting the client’s interests and ensuring that all applicable rules are adhered to in order to avoid potential problems that could arise in the future.

Review Sales Transactions

Some real estate attorneys are involved only in reviewing and providing advice on real estate transactions. Clients will negotiate their deals, sign a contract and then ask the lawyer to perform the due diligence on the deal. This means the lawyer will examine legal title issues, environmental issues and reports and any of the contracts or other documents involved in the transaction. Real estate lawyers have training that allows them to spot problems that their clients do not recognize. In this role, the real estate lawyer plays guardian for the clients to make sure the clients don’t fall into any unseen legal traps.

Handle Foreclosure Proceedings

Many real estate attorneys specialize in mortgage and trust deed foreclosure, particularly during difficult economic times. Some lawyers represent lenders while others represent borrowers. The lawyers representing lenders help guide lenders correctly through the foreclosure process, which may include filing a lawsuit in court. The lawyers representing borrowers, on the other hand, try to make life difficult for the foreclosing lender by challenging any mistakes made in the foreclosure process, and by negotiating with the lender for a settlement agreement to stop the foreclosure process.

Addressing Liens and Other Title Issues

An attorney can help you with the title search process. A title search will help you discover any problems with the title before you purchase a property. For example, if the person selling the property does not have the legal authority to do so, the entire transaction can be voided. A title search will also allow you to determine if there are any encumbrances on the property, including judgments or liens. A seasoned real estate attorney is your best option. He will explain everything you need to know and walk you through your issues, because he has the in-depth knowledge and experience with real estate transactions that many lawyers lack. If any issues come up in a title search, a real estate attorney can help you address them. You may be able to have the liens removed or negotiate a lower price for the property based on potential issues with the title.

Types of Real Estate Contracts

There are several types of real estate contracts, and it is important to know that contracts are necessary for real estate deals. A contract is a legally enforceable document between two or more people. The contract consists of an offer, acceptance, consideration, legal capacity, and legality of purpose.

Real Estate Purchase Agreement (also called a REPC or Real Estate Purchase Contract)

A purchase agreement is the most common type of real estate agreement. This contract specifies the details regarding the sale of property. It will include the address of the property, the price, names of both parties, signatures of both parties, and the closing date.
There are several kinds of purchase agreements as follows:
 State/Association Purchase Agreement, which is the standard agreement between a purchaser and seller when a real estate agent is involved
 General Purchase Agreement, which is a simply a shortened version of the above-mentioned contract, and is used usually when no real estate agent is involved in the transaction
 Property-Specific Purchase Agreement, which could be used for vacant land or a mobile home
Real Estate Assignment Contract
A Real Estate Assignment Contract is used in a wholesale investment purchase. This could include distressed properties that are secured and then assigned to another buyer. There are certain terms added to this type of contract, as the term “assigns” is the common word used to differentiate it as an assignment contract.

Real Estate Lease Agreement

This is a contract that binds an owner and a renter to the property. Therefore, the proper owner (referred to as a landlord) enters into an agreement with a tenant (the lessee) to reside in the home at a specified monthly rate. Additional items to be included in this agreement include payment of utilities and the security deposit. It’s important to ensure important items are mentioned in the lease agreement to prevent future legal disputes.

Real Estate Power of Attorney

While a Power of Attorney is generally not used in a real estate contract, such documents could be used in situations if a party is unable to sign the contract, i.e. party is not physically in the country to sign, or has a mental disability. In this case, the party can hire another party to act as the power of attorney to sign on his or her behalf. This type of contract can also be beneficial if you are the property owner of several investment (rental) properties or if you are carrying for an older parent or family member who might not have the ability to sign the contract.

Hiring A Real Estate Attorney

First of all, they help you protect yourself. When you’re signing contracts, you want to know just what you’re getting yourself into. Unless you have a legal background, you’ll likely need professional assistance from an attorney. Additionally, an attorney can be a great source of advice. They can help with negotiations, getting a better deal, and closing the property with ease. This is often much-needed peace of mind since they can provide more legal insight than your real estate agent.
Finally, an attorney can guard your title to the property. When you purchase title insurance, for example, the insurance provider usually maximized exceptions to coverage. An attorney can work on your behalf to limit your own liability when it comes to your title. Ultimately, an attorney is a great way to ensure you have extra support throughout this process.

Real Estate Lawyer Consultation

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Estate Planning Attorney Salt Lake City Utah

Lawyer To File Bankruptcy

Uncontested Divorce Utah

How To Better Manage Credit Card Debt

Lawyers For Divorce In Cottonwood Heights Utah

What Happens To A Mortgage After Divorce?

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Military Real Estate Lawyer

Military Real Estate Lawyer

Buying a home will probably be the largest and most significant purchase you will make in your life. It also involves the law of real property, which is unique and raises special legal issues and problems not present in other transactions. A real estate lawyer is trained to handle these problems and has the most experience to deal with them.

Making a Purchase

In the typical home purchase, the seller enters into a contract with a real estate agent, usually in writing. When the broker finds a potential buyer, they conduct the negotiations and most often act as an intermediary (the go-between). Once an informal agreement is reached, the buyer and seller enter into a formal written contract for the sale of the new home. This is known as the purchase agreement.

The home buying process then follows the following steps:
• The buyer obtains a commitment for financing.
• A title search is conducted to satisfy the lender and the buyer.
• Finally, the property is transferred from the seller to the buyer, and the seller receives the purchase price bargained for in the contract.

The process seems simple, but without a lawyer, the consequences may be more disastrous than purchasing a car that turns out to be a lemon or a stock investment that was unwise.

Avoid Vague or Unclear Terms In Your Real Estate Contract

A lawyer can help you avoid some common problems with a home purchase or sale. For example, a seller may sign a brokerage agreement that does not deal with a number of legal issues. This happens quite often as realtors often use standard forms, expecting that they will cover all situations. In the absence of an agreement to the contrary, the seller may become liable to pay a brokerage commission even if a sale does not occur, or they may be forced to pay more than one brokerage commission. If the agreement allows the seller the right to negotiate on their own behalf, however, you may avoid this potential problem. It is thus recommended that the seller have the advice and guidance of an attorney with respect to a brokerage agreement. Even if the agreement is a standard form, its terms should be explained to the seller and revised, if necessary.

Consider a Real Estate Lawyer Consultation

Even if a lawyer is not needed during the course of negotiations, both the buyer and seller may want to consult with a lawyer to answer important legal questions, such as the tax consequences of the real estate transaction. The tax consequences may be of critical importance to a home seller. For example, the income tax consequences of a sale, particularly if the seller makes a large profit, may be considerable. An attorney can advise whether the seller can take advantage of tax provisions allowing for exclusion of capital gains in certain circumstances.

Real Estate Purchase Agreements

The purchase agreement is the single most important document in the transaction. Although standard printed forms are useful, a lawyer is helpful in explaining the forms and making changes and additions to reflect the home buyer’s and the seller’s desires.

There are many issues that may need to be addressed in the purchase agreement, such as:
• If the property has changed or if there has been an addition to the property, was it done lawfully?
• If the buyer has plans to change the property, can that be done lawfully?
• What happens if a buyer has a home inspector inspect the property and termites, asbestos, radon, or lead-based paint is found?
• What if the property is found to contain hazardous waste?
• What are the legal outcomes if the closing does not take place, and what happens to the down payment?
• Will the down payment be held in escrow by a lawyer according to the escrow instructions? How is the payment to be made?

Is the closing conditioned upon the buyer obtaining financing?

Most buyers finance a substantial portion of the purchase price for a home with a mortgage loan from a lending institution. The purchase agreement should contain a carefully worded provision that is subject to the buyer obtaining a commitment for financing.

Real Estate Title Search

After the purchase agreement is signed, it is necessary to establish the state of the seller’s title to the property to satisfy the buyer and the financial institution. Generally, a title search is ordered from an abstract or title insurance company. In some states, title insurance is not typical. In these cases, an attorney is essential to review the status of title and give an opinion of title in lieu of a title policy. Assuming you are in an area where title insurance is customary, an attorney can help review the title search and explain the title exceptions as to what is not insured. They will also determine whether the legal description is correct and whether there are problems with adjoining owners or prior owners. In addition, an attorney can explain the effect of easements and agreements or restrictions imposed by a prior owner, and whether there are any legal restrictions which will undermine your ability to sell the property. The title search does not tell the buyer or seller anything about existing and prospective zoning. A lawyer can explain whether zoning prohibits a two-family home, or whether planned improvements violate zoning ordinances.

Real Estate Title Closing

The closing is the most important event in the purchase and sale transaction. The deed and other closing papers must be prepared. At the closing, title passes from seller to buyer, who pays the balance of the purchase price. Frequently, this balance is paid in part from the proceeds of a mortgage loan. A closing statement should be prepared prior to the closing indicating the debits and credits to the buyer and seller. An attorney, here, becomes helpful in explaining the nature, amount, and fairness of closing costs. Once the deed and other closing documents are signed, an attorney can make sure that these documents are appropriately executed and explained to everyone.

Importance of Having a Lawyer During Closing

The closing process can be confusing and complex to the buyer and seller. Those present at the closing often include the buyer and seller, their respective attorneys, the title closer (representative of the title company), an attorney for any lending institution, and the real estate broker. There may also be last-minute disputes about delivering possession and personal property or the adjustment of various costs, such as fuel and taxes. If you are the only person there without a lawyer, your rights may be at risk. A broker generally serves the seller, and the lender is obtained by the buyer. Both want to see the deal go through since that is how they will get paid. However, neither can provide legal counsel. If you want peace of mind when making one of the biggest purchases of your lifetime, you should consider speaking with an experienced real estate attorney.

Military Attorney and Lawyers

A military lawyer’s job is similar to a civilian lawyer in their day-to-day duties. Representing clientele under jurisdiction of military courts and law is the primary difference. The military attorney works exclusively with military personnel and may represent them in civil and criminal cases. Each Military lawyer may work within any branch of the Navy, Army, Marines, or Air force even though each branch has their own Judge Advocate Generals (also known as JAGs). Military personnel may contact any military legal assistance office if they need legal representation. A Jag practices law in a Military court including court-martial, military review, Military Court of Inquiry, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. A Jag will go through the same educational process of a civilian lawyer. Military attorneys will need to know general law as well as military law. They can either become a JAG after entering the military, or they may enter the military with the JAG requirements completed.

The role of a military attorney is as broad as that of a civilian attorney. They will participate in matters of both civil and criminal nature. One of the primary differences of a military court is the military tribunal that deals with enemies during wartime.

Some of the roles of the military lawyer include:
• Advising military clients brought before the courts.
• Handling the legal discipline of military personnel.
• Drafting and preparing legal documents.
• Creating and maintaining military handbooks.
• Preparing a client for trial.
• Advising commanders on international law, military law, and civilian law.
• Acting as council for court-martial.

A military attorney must possess an excellent understanding of all parts of civil and military law. Their advice and actions not only affect individuals, it may also reflect on their branch of service and the United States Government. They must be able to work under pressure while maintaining a cool decorum. They will need to have excellent communication skills both in the courtroom and out. Their ability to represent a broad range of clientele, from a young enlisted soldier to a high-ranking commander, requires they are comfortable communicating across the ranks.

Examples of Cases for Military Lawyers

The military court, while similar to civilian court, also differs. Therefore, the cases that a military lawyer participates in may be different.

A few examples are:
• Offenses- Military rules provide a variety of offenses that military personnel may be charged with. While many of the criminal offenses are similar to civilian courts such as murder and theft, the military oversees special offenses unique to the armed forces. These offenses include: desertion, murder in combat, and insubordination.
• Court-Martial- One of the prevailing outcomes of any criminal proceeding against military personnel is a Court-Martial. If a person is found guilty of a crime, a court-martial is likely. The military attorney may represent the offending party or the military branch they serve.
• Landlord Tenant Disputes- Moving is one of the hallmarks of military life. As such, it is not uncommon for military personnel to find the need to hire an attorney in a landlord-tenant dispute. While military lawyers do not represent clients dealing with other civil issues such as divorce or child custody, they will represent a military client in a landlord-tenant case.
The job outlook of a military lawyer will vary. Each branch of the military may have different needs. For instance, the Marines are a small branch of the service and serve as part of the Navy. The Marines may not need as many legal personnel than the Army. Speaking with a recruiting officer may offer insight into the possibilities of a career as a lawyer in the military. The salary of a military attorney is set by rank and years in the military. A new attorney may start out at $38,000 a year. As they move up the ranks they can earn six-digit incomes. Regardless of your age, or the size and complexity of your estate, an estate plan can accomplish the following:
• Identify the family members and other loved ones that you wish to receive your property after your death.
• Ensure that your property will be transferred to those you have identified, as quickly and with as few legal hurdles as possible.
• Minimize the amount of taxes that will need to be paid in order for your property to pass to others after your death.
• Avoid the time and costs associated with the probate process by utilizing estate planning devices like living trusts and “payable on death” bank accounts.
• Dictate the kinds of life-prolonging medical care you wish to receive should you be unable to make your wishes known when the time comes.
• Set forth the kind of funeral arrangements you would like, and how related expenses are to be paid.

Military Real Estate Lawyer Free Consultation

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Home Foreclosure In Utah

Bitter Divorce

Guardianships In Utah

Shoplifting And Theft Attorney

Utah Divorce Lawyers For Dads

Can I File A New Bankruptcy Case?

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Utah Code 57-1-5

Utah Real Estate Code 57-1-5

Utah Real Estate Code 57-1-5: Creation Of Joint Tenancy Presumed, Tenancy In Common, Severance Of Joint Tenancy, Tenants By The Entirety, Tenants Holding As Community Property.

(1) (a) (i) Beginning on May 5, 1997, every ownership interest in real estate granted to two persons in their own right who are designated as husband and wife in the granting documents is presumed to be a joint tenancy interest with rights of survivorship, unless severed, converted, or expressly declared in the grant to be otherwise.
(ii) Except as provided in Subsection (1) (a) (iii), joint tenancy may be established between two or more people.
(iii) Joint tenancy may not be established between a person and an entity or organization, including: (A) a corporation; (B) a trustee of a trust; or (C) a partnership.

(iv) Joint tenancy may not be established between an entity or organization and another entity or organization. (b) Every ownership interest in real estate that does not qualify for the joint tenancy presumption as provided in Subsection (1)(a) is presumed to be a tenancy in common interest unless expressly declared in the grant to be otherwise.
(2) (a) Use of words “joint tenancy” or “with rights of survivorship” or “and to the survivor of them” or words of similar import means a joint tenancy. (b) (i) Use of words “tenancy in common” or “with no rights of survivorship” or “undivided interest” or words of similar import declare a tenancy in common. (ii) Use of words “and/or” in the context of an ownership interest declare a tenancy in common unless accompanied by joint tenancy language described in Subsection (2)(a), which creates a joint tenancy.
(3) A person who owns real property creates a joint tenancy in himself or herself and another or others: (a) by making a transfer to himself or herself and another or others as joint tenants by use of the words as provided in Subsection (2)(a); or (b) by conveying to another person or persons an interest in land in which an interest is retained by the grantor and by declaring the creation of a joint tenancy by use of the words as provided in Subsection (2)(a).
(4) In all cases, the interest of joint tenants shall be equal and undivided.
(5) (a) Except as provided in Subsection (5)(b), if a joint tenant makes a bona fide conveyance of the joint tenant’s interest in property held in joint tenancy to himself or herself or another, the joint tenancy is severed and converted into a tenancy in common. (b) If there is more than one joint tenant remaining after a joint tenant severs a joint tenancy under Subsection (5)(a), the remaining joint tenants continue to hold their interest in joint tenancy.

(6) the amendments to this section in Laws of Utah 1997, Chapter 124, have no retrospective operation and shall govern instruments executed and recorded on or after May 5, 1997.
(7) Tenants by the entirety are considered to be joint tenants. (8) Tenants holding title as community property are considered to be joint tenants.
When two or more people (whether spouses, friends, or business partners) purchase property, they put significant thought into, among other things, the property’s value, appearance, and condition, and how they are going to improve the property. They rarely, however, consider how they should take title to the property. Concurrent ownership exists where two or more people own property together, with neither person having exclusive use and possession of any specific part of the property. In Utah, there are, for all practical purposes, three types of concurrent ownership:
• Tenancy in Common,
• Joint Tenancy with the Right of Survivorship, and
• Tenancy by the Entirety.
Each type of concurrent ownership has its own distinct advantages and disadvantages, especially in matters involving the sale of the property, estate considerations, protection from creditors, and contribution toward maintenance and repair of the property. Before you purchase property with someone else, you should consider how you plan to use the property and how you plan to dispose of it during and after your lifetime, and then consider which one of the following forms of ownership will work best for you.

Tenancy in Common

Tenancy in common is the most prevailing form of concurrent ownership of real property used by unmarried people. In a tenancy in common, two or more people own the same parcel of land in undivided interests which may be equal or unequal in size. For example, two people each may own a ½ undivided interest or one might own a 25% undivided interest and the other one the remaining 75% interest. Whatever the size of the undivided interests, each of the owners is entitled to the use and possession of all of the property. Each owner’s undivided interest in the property is freely alienable by sale, gift, or otherwise and, therefore, this form of concurrent ownership is the most unrestricted form. Each owner is free to sell, encumber, and allow that owner’s interest in the property to pass by will or intestate succession to the owner’s heirs or devisees (the other owners having no right of survivorship in any other owner’s undivided interest in the property). Someone who purchases property for investment purposes, who wants to be able to devise his or her property pursuant to a will or trust, or who simply does not have a plan for the property should consider this form of ownership.

Although a tenancy in common allows each owner the freedom to dispose of that owner’s interest in the property as that owner chooses, there are a few obligations and potential problems that anyone taking title to property as a tenant in common should consider:
• Each tenant in common is responsible for payment of property taxes, assessments, liens on the property, and repairs. If one owner pays the taxes or assessments or makes necessary repairs, that owner is entitled to contribution from the other owners. There may be exceptions to this rule if the owner seeking contribution is the only owner in actual possession of the property, but generally each owner is obligated to contribute toward the maintenance and preservation of the property in proportion to that owner’s undivided interest.

• Generally, a tenant in common who possesses the property does not have to pay the other owners for possession of the property as long as the other owners are free to use and possess the property as well. If, however, one owner denies the other owners the right to use and possess the property, those owners may take legal action to regain possession of the property and may be entitled to damages.
• If there is a dispute regarding the use or disposition of the property (for example, one tenant in common wants to sell the entire property, but the other owners refuse to sell) or if one of the owners simply wants sole ownership and possession of a discrete portion of the property, any of the owners may force a partition of the property. If the court allows a partition, the property will be divided among the owners, with each becoming the sole owner of the portion of the property awarded to that owner. If the court finds that physically partitioning the property would cause substantial injury to one or more of the owners, the court can order the entire property to be sold and the proceeds divided among the owners according to their undivided interests.

Joint Tenancy with the Right of Survivorship

A joint tenancy with the right of survivorship is similar to a tenancy in common, having the same attributes mentioned above, but with one very significant additional attribute: the right of survivorship. Under a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship, when one owner dies, the other joint tenant gets that owner’s share in the property, regardless of the provisions of the deceased owner’s will or the laws of intestate succession. If the ownership interests among three or more joint tenants are held in unequal shares, the share of the deceased owner is divided among the surviving joint tenants according to their respective pro rata interests, unless the creating instrument provides otherwise. Because of the effect of this form of concurrent ownership on the disposition of one’s property after death, a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship should be used only after consultation with an estate planning professional.
Before creating a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship, it is important to consider the following:

• Make sure the instrument creating the joint tenancy with the right of survivorship explicitly states that the purpose of the instrument is to create a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship and not a tenancy in common. If two unmarried people take title to property, the law presumes that they will hold title as tenants in common unless the language in the instrument clearly provides otherwise.

• Despite the “right of survivorship” one joint tenant can sever the joint tenancy with the right of survivorship by transferring that owner’s undivided interest to another party and thereby create a tenancy in common. Despite the intention of the party creating the joint tenancy with the right of survivorship, one joint tenant can unilaterally destroy that form of concurrent ownership.

Tenancy by the Entirety

Only a husband and wife (a bill has been introduced in the General Assembly to change references to “husband” and “wife” in tenancy by the entirety statutes to “spouse”) can own property as tenants by the entirety. It was the early common law’s version of “social security” because of the legal fiction that neither the husband nor the wife owns the property; rather, it is the marital state or union that owns the property. As a result, a lien or judgment docketed against one spouse will not attach to property owned as tenants by the entirety because the property is not owned by the husband or the wife, but by the marital entity. If two people who are married to each other take title to property, they will own the property as tenants by the entirety unless the instrument of conveyance clearly provides otherwise. Note, however, that a man and woman who own property and then subsequently get married do not then automatically own the property as tenants by the entirety. They must record a new instrument of conveyance to create a tenancy by the entirety. A tenancy by the entirety is similar to a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship, but with a few additional characteristics:

• Whereas a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship can be severed by one owner, neither spouse can sever the tenancy by the entirety by selling an interest in the property. In fact, neither spouse may sell or encumber the property or any interest in it without the other spouse executing the deed, deed of trust, or other instrument. One spouse also cannot devise his or her interest in a will.

• Despite the common law protection of the property from the individual debts of the husband and wife, there is a limited exception for federal tax liens. The United States Supreme Court held that a federal tax lien against one spouse will attach to that spouse’s “interest in the property” pursuant to state law, but it is still unclear exactly what that interest is for federal tax purposes in states such as North Carolina where, at least until death, divorce, or voluntary conveyance, neither spouse is considered to own any interest in the property.

• A tenancy by the entirety may be destroyed only by: (i) voluntary partition where the married couple conveys the property to themselves as tenants in common (neither spouse can force a partition); (ii) absolute divorce, in which case the former spouses become tenants in common, each with a ½ undivided interest in the property; or (iii) death of one spouse, in which case the survivorship element of the tenancy by the entirety automatically makes the surviving spouse the sole owner of the property.

How to Take Title in Joint Tenancy

To create a joint tenancy, be sure to get the right legal words on the title document. Joint tenancy is a popular way to avoid probate. It certainly has the virtue of simplicity. To create a joint tenancy, all you need to do is put the right words on the title document, such as a deed to real estate, a car’s title slip, or the signature card establishing a bank account.

General Rule In Majority Of States

In the great majority of states, if you and the other owners call yourselves “joint tenants with the right of survivorship,” or put the abbreviation “JT WROS” after your names on the title document, you create a joint tenancy.

A car salesman or bank staffer may assure you that other words are enough. For example, connecting the names of the owners with the word “or,” not “and,” does create a joint tenancy, in some circumstances, in some states. But it’s always better to unambiguously spell out what you want: joint tenancy with right of survivorship. Joint tenancy or a form of ownership that achieves the same probate avoiding result is available in all states, although a few impose restrictions. Remember that one rule applies in every state except Colorado, Connecticut, North Carolina, Ohio, and Vermont: All joint tenants must own equal shares of the property. If you want a different arrangement, such as 60-40 ownership, joint tenancy is not for you.

State Restrictions on Joint Tenancy

• Alaska: No joint tenancy in real estate, except for husband and wife, who may own as tenants by the entirety
• Oregon: Transfer to husband and wife creates tenancy by the entirety unless the document clearly states otherwise
• Tennessee: Transfer to husband and wife creates tenancy by the entirety, not joint tenancy
• Wisconsin: No joint tenancy between spouses; property becomes survivorship marital property

The form of ownership in which you take title to property can significantly affect the way in which you can use the property, dispose of it, and pass it to others. Because there are benefits and consequences to taking title to property by each of the ways described above, especially regarding estate planning matters, it is important to take time to consider, along with the many other considerations you make when purchasing property, exactly how you intend to use and ultimately transfer the property.

Utah Real Estate Lawyer

When you need legal help from a Utah Real Estate Attorney, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC
4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Procedure For Obtaining Federal Firearms License

Types Of Foreclosure Defense

Injury Lawyer

Shake Shack’s IPO

Prenuptial Lawyer

How Long Can An Executor Hold Money After Probate?

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Residential Loan Modification

Residential Loan Modification

A loan modification is different from refinancing your mortgage. Refinancing entails replacing your loan with a new mortgage, whereas a loan modification changes the terms of your existing loan.

How does loan modification work?

Getting a mortgage loan modification could mean extending the length of your term, lowering your interest rate or changing from an adjustable-rate mortgage to a fixed-rate loan. Though the terms of your modification are up to the lender, the outcome is lower, more affordable monthly mortgage payments. Foreclosure is a costly process for lenders, so many are willing to consider loan modification as a way to avoid it. Foreclosure is a costly process for lenders, so many are willing to consider loan modification as a way to avoid it.

Who qualifies for a loan modification?

Not everyone struggling to make a mortgage payment can qualify for a loan modification. In general, homeowners must either be delinquent or facing imminent default, meaning they’re not delinquent yet, but there’s a high probability they will be. Reasons for imminent default include the loss of a job, loss of a spouse, a disability or an illness that has affected your ability to repay your mortgage on the original loan terms.

Types of loan modification programs

Some lenders and servicers offer their own loan modification programs, and the changes they make to your terms may be either temporary or permanent. If your lender or servicer doesn’t have a program of its own, ask if you are eligible for any other assistance programs that can help you modify or even refinance your mortgage. The federal government previously offered the Home Affordable Modification Program, but it expired at the end of 2016. Now, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have a foreclosure-prevention program, called the Flex Modification program, which went into effect Oct. 1, 2017. If your mortgage is owned or guaranteed by either Fannie or Freddie, you may be eligible for this program. The federal Home Affordable Refinance Program, or HARP, helped underwater homeowners refinance into a more affordable mortgage. HARP has also expired. Fannie Mae’s High Loan-to-Value Refinance Option and Freddie Mac’s Enhanced Relief Refinance replaced HARP in 2019.

How to get a mortgage loan modification

If you are struggling to make your mortgage payments, contact your lender or servicer immediately and ask about your options. Avoiding phone calls or procrastinating will only make matters worse. The loan modification application process varies from lender to lender; some require proof of hardship, and others require a hardship letter explaining why you need the modification. If you’re denied a loan modification, you can file an appeal with your mortgage servicer. Consider working with a HUD-approved housing counsellor, who can assist you for free in challenging the decision and help you understand your options.

Know before you modify

One potential downside to a loan modification: It may be added to your credit report and could negatively impact your credit score. The resulting credit dip won’t be nearly as negative as a foreclosure but could affect your ability to qualify for other loans for a time. If your modification is temporary, you’ll likely need to return to the original terms of your mortgage and repay the amount that was deferred before you can qualify for a new purchase or refinance loan. After permanent modifications, lenders may want to see a record of 12 or even 24 on-time payments to determine your ability to repay a new loan. Be aware that, depending on how your loan is modified, your mortgage term could be extended, meaning it will take longer to pay off your loan and will cost you more in interest. But for homeowners on the brink of losing their homes, the benefits of a loan modification can far outweigh the potential credit risks and extra interest.

Loan Modification: Lower Your Mortgage Payments and Avoid Foreclosure
When you find yourself struggling to make your mortgage payments, you don’t necessarily have to default—you can make a few adjustments and get back on track without doing significant damage to your credit. A mortgage modification program can provide relief by making permanent or temporary changes to your loan. Understanding what a loan modification involves and how to get one can help you stay on top of your loan payments and potentially keep your home.

Basics of Mortgage Modification

A loan modification is a change that the lender makes to the original terms of your mortgage, typically due to financial hardship. The goal is to reduce your monthly payment to an amount that you can afford, which you can achieve in a variety of ways. Your lender will calculate a new monthly payment based on amendments that it makes to your initial mortgage contract.1

Why Lenders Permit Mortgage Modification

Adjusting a loan tends to be less expensive and time-consuming for lenders and can take less of a financial and emotional toll on homeowners compared to other legal or financial remedies for recouping money from a borrower who cannot repay their loan. Without a loan modification, your lender has several unattractive options to choose from to pay off your outstanding debt if and when you stop making mortgage payments. It can:
• Foreclose on your property: A mortgage modification is a less palatable alternative to a foreclosure, which occurs when a bank repossesses a home, evicts the homeowner, and sells the home of a borrower who cannot repay their loan.
• Facilitate a short sale: This refers to the sale of a home for less than what the homeowner owes on their mortgage.3 It still results in the homeowner losing their home.
• Attempt to collect the money you owe through wage garnishment, bank levies, or collection agencies: With wage garnishment, a creditor generally has to get a court order to have a portion of your pay check withheld to pay off your outstanding debt.
• Charge off the loan: In lieu of a foreclosure, a lender might decide to write the loan off as a loss if they determine that the debt is unlikely to be collected.
• Lose the ability to recover funds: If you declare bankruptcy, which can temporarily halt a foreclosure, the bank may not be able to recoup the funds.

The above options will likely either result in the loss of your home or damage to your credit. In contrast, what a loan modification enables a homeowner to do is stay in their home and potentially take less of a hit to their credit score than a foreclosure would cause or even no impact to their credit in the case of some government mortgage modification programs.

Mortgage Modification Options

Your lender might not offer all of these options, and some types of loan adjustments may be more suitable for you than others. However, common alternatives include:
• Principal reduction: Your lender will eliminate a portion of your debt, allowing you to repay less than you originally borrowed. It will recalculate your monthly payments based on this decreased balance, so they should be smaller. This type of mortgage modification is usually the most difficult to qualify for, and lenders are typically reluctant to reduce the principal on loans. They’re more eager to change other features which can result in more of a profit for them. If you’re fortunate enough to get approved for a principal reduction, discuss the implications with a tax advisor before moving forward; you might owe taxes on the forgiven debt.
• Lower interest rate: Your lender can also reduce your interest rates, which will reduce your required monthly payments. Sometimes these rate reductions are temporary, however, so read the details carefully and prepare yourself for the day when your interest rate might increase again.
• Extended-term: You’ll have more years to repay your debt with a longer-term loan, and this, too, will result in lower monthly payments. This option is commonly referred to as “re-amortization.” But longer repayment periods usually result in higher interest costs overall because you’re paying interest across more months. You could end up paying more for your loan than you were originally going to pay.
• Fixed-rate loan: If your adjustable-rate mortgage is proving to be unaffordable, you can prevent problems by switching to a fixed-rate loan where the interest rate is fixed over the loan term.
• Postponed payments: You might be able to temporarily pause loan payments if you’re between jobs but you know that you have a pay check coming in the future, or if you have surprise medical expenses that you know you will pay off eventually. This type of modification is often referred to as a “forbearance agreement.” You’ll have to make up those missed payments at some point, however. Your lender will add them to the end of your loan, so it will take a few extra months to pay off the debt. Punch the numbers into a loan amortization calculator to see exactly how your payment changes when you use any of these strategies.

Loan Modification Government Programs

Depending on the type of loan you have, you may be able to qualify for a government mortgage modification program, which may not negatively impact your credit score at all. Government programs, which include Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) loans, and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) loans, offer relief, and some federal and state agencies, can also help. Speak with your loan servicer or a HUD-approved counselor for details. For other loans, try the Fannie Mae Mortgage Help Network. The federal government previously offered the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP), and Freddie Mac’s Enhanced Relief Refinance Program. However, those have all expired and have been replaced by Fannie Mae’s Flex Modification and the High Loan-to-Value Refinance Option, so these are a good place to start for assistance.

How to Get a Mortgage Modification

Start with a phone call or online inquiry to the lender. Be honest and explain why it’s hard for you to make your mortgage payments right now. Then, let your lender know about your proposed adjustment to the mortgage. Lenders will generally require a loss mitigation application and details about your finances to evaluate your request, and some will require that you also be delinquent with your mortgage payments, often by up to 60 days. Be prepared to provide certain information:
• Income: This is how much you earn and where it comes from.
• Expenses: Be prepared to share how much you spend each month, and how much goes toward different categories, such as housing, food, and transportation.
• Documents: You’ll often need to provide proof of your financial situation, including pay stubs, bank statements, tax returns, and loan statements.
• A hardship letter: Explain what happened that affects your ability to make your current mortgage payments, and how you hope to or have rectified the situation. Your other documentation should support this information.
• IRS Form 4506-T: This form allows the lender to access your tax information from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) if you can’t or don’t supply it yourself.

The application process can take several hours. You’ll have to fill out forms, gather information, and submit everything in the format your lender requires. Your application might be pushed aside—or worse, rejected—if something your lender asked for is missing or outdated. Different lenders have different criteria for approving loan modification requests, so there’s no way to know if you’ll qualify other than to ask. Within 30 days of receiving a completed application, the lender generally must respond to your application with written notice of its offer or denial along with the specific terms of the mortgage modification. Keep in contact with your lender during this time in case it has questions. It’s usually best to do what your bank tells you to do during this time, if at all possible. For example, you might be instructed to continue making payments. Doing so could help you qualify for the mortgage modification. In fact, this is a requirement for approval with some lenders. Once you receive an offer for a loan modification, you’ll have to accept or deny it within the prescribed timeframe to see the changes reflected in your loan.

Refinance the Loan Instead

Modification is typically an option for borrowers who are unable to refinance, but it might be possible to replace your existing loan with a brand new one. This is a particularly good option if you want to get cash out from the equity that has built up in your home. A new loan might have a lower interest rate and a longer repayment period, so the result would be the same—you’d have lower payments going forward. You’ll probably have to pay application and origination fees on the new loan, however, and you’ll also need decent credit.

Consider Bankruptcy Over Loan Modification

If you can’t get a mortgage modification or refinance the loan, you might have one other option for keeping the property: filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. This isn’t the same as a Chapter 7 bankruptcy where the court takes control of your non-exempt assets, if any, and liquidates them to pay your creditors. Chapter 13 allows you to enter into a court-approved payment plan to pay off your debts, usually for three to five years. You can include your mortgage arrears if you qualify, allowing you to catch up, get back on your feet, and even keep your home, but you must typically continue to make your current mortgage payments during this time period. This might be possible, however, if you can consolidate your other debts into the payment plan as well. You must have sufficient income to qualify.

How Forbearance Agreements Work

While a loan modification is a permanent solution to unaffordable monthly payments, a forbearance agreement provides short-term relief for borrowers. With a forbearance, the lender agrees to reduce or suspend mortgage payments for a while. During the forbearance period, the servicer (on behalf of the lender) won’t initiate a foreclosure. In exchange, the borrower must resume making the full payment at the end of the forbearance period, and typically get current on the missed payments, including principal, interest, taxes, and insurance. You can usually:
• pay the amount in a lump sum
• add an extra amount to your regular payments each month until the entire skipped amount is repaid, or
• complete a loan modification (see below) in which the lender adds the unpaid amounts to the balance of the loan.
The specific terms of a forbearance agreement will vary from lender to lender.
If a temporary hardship causes you to fall behind in your mortgage payments, a forbearance agreement might allow you to avoid foreclosure until your situation gets better. In some cases, the lender might be able to extend the forbearance if your hardship isn’t resolved by the end of the forbearance period to accommodate your situation. In a forbearance agreement, unlike a repayment plan, the lender usually agrees in advance for you to miss or reduce your payments.

The Process For Obtaining A Loan Modification

The modification process has several steps. The length of time and the documentation required will vary greatly depending on the lender and the nature of your personal situation.
The basic process for modification is as follows:
• Signature and Documentation: The loan application documents required in the lender’s packet must be completely filled out including required signatures. All documentation must be submitted per the items listed in the packet along with any documentation for your specific circumstance.
• Submission of Documentation: Once the application is completed and the required documents are gathered your loan number and the last 4 of your social security must be noted in the right hand corner of each page. The application and the documentation can then be submitted to your lender via fax, email or US Mail depending on their submittal process.
• Pre-review: The loan application and the documentation, once received by the lender is reviewed by your personal contact person for legibility and completeness. The personal contact person will contact you if the loan application is incomplete or documentation is missing. Contact your personal contact person on a weekly basis to check the status and updates to expedite this process.
• Review: Once your application is considered complete the application and documentation is then sent to an underwriter for review and approval. Depending on the information and documentation that was supplied the underwriter might request additional information or documentation before making a determination. This last step takes approximately 30 days before a determination is made.
• Approval for Trial Payments: Once your application is reviewed and if approved you will be required to make 3 trial payments before your final loan modification is approved. The trial payments need to be made in a timely manner or your loan modification will be denied.
• Final Approval: Once the 3 trial modification payments have been made and received by the lender, the final loan modification will be prepared and sent to you for review and approval. If the terms are acceptable, you must sign and return the loan modification in the allotted timeframe. If you currently are in a bankruptcy, Court approval must be obtained before the loan modification is final. A motion will be prepared to file with the Court and set for hearing in order to get the required Court approval. The loan modification is not final until all the required documents are signed by both the lender and yourself.

Loan Modification Lawyer

When you need legal help with a loan modification in Utah, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Severance And Executive Compensation Agreement Lawyer

West Valley City Utah Divorce Attorney

Defense Attorney

Can You Make Payment Arrangements On A Garnishment?

How Do You Secretly Prepare For A Divorce?

Utah Pornography Distribution Cases

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office