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Debts After Someone Dies

Debts After Someone Dies

Settling the affairs of a loved one who has passed on can be difficult. Family members are often left to make important financial decisions on behalf of their deceased relative during this already emotional time. These decisions often involve whether to repay any debts owed by the debtor after death – including credit card debt, student loan debt, mortgage loans, and other financial obligations. Relatives, however, are generally not responsible for paying the debts of the deceased – and creditors are sometimes left to swallow the cost of the debt, despite creditors who would make you believe it is your obligation to repay the debt.

Are You Responsible for the Debts of a Deceased Relative?

From an estate administration perspective, debts after death are generally repaid through a person’s estate – whether or not there was a will – and relatives are not responsible for paying off debts that were not jointly owned at the time of the debtor’s death. When a person dies, his debts often die along with him. Whether you are responsible for repaying the debts of a deceased relative depends on whether you owned any part of the debt at the time of the debtor’s death, or have received substantial benefits from the debt itself (as in the case of a loan used to pay your personal living expenses.)

What Happens To Credit Card Debt After You Die?

Credit card debts belong to the credit card account holder and relatives should not have to pay for their deceased family member’s debts unless they co-signed on the loan or it is a debt from a joint account. However, those who live in community property states, where property and assets acquired during a marriage are considered jointly owned, may be liable for the debt.
Therefore, creditors are often out of luck when there is not enough money in a decedent’s estate to go around. Even so, creditors will often go to grave lengths to collect any and all debts owed to them — even from the deceased – through requests from spouses and relatives. Payments on behalf of a deceased relative, however, are voluntary, not required.

For relatives seeking to get an accounting of debts owed by the decedent after death, executors of an estate can request credit card balances of the deceased’s account. Under a provision of the new CARD Act, the issuer has 30 days to provide the balances and can’t charge any penalty fees or interest if you or the estate pays off the balance within 30 days after it provides that information.

If a person believes they are being unfairly contacted, or even harassed, by overzealous debt collectors, it may be wise to speak with a local debtor – creditor attorney to help you determine your rights under your state’s law.

What About The Mortgage After Death?

Similar to credit card debt after death, mortgage debt belongs to the borrower of the mortgage loan. If a spouse was named as a joint owner on the loan, then he or she would be liable for the loan debt after the death of the debtor spouse. Just as with the deceased’s unsecured debts, a note associated with a mortgage is not forgiven simply because the borrower dies. Instead, the surviving spouse can decide whether to continue to make payments on the note – and thereby continue to live in the home – or sale the house to pay off the existing loan. Life insurance policies are not part of the estate, and proceeds from life insurance policies go directly to the named beneficiary. Beneficiaries are therefore not obligated to use the proceeds to pay for any remaining debts the debtor may have after death.

Free Consultation with a Probate Lawyer

When you need help from a probate lawyer, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
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Michael Anderson

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.