fbpx
8833 South Redwood Road
Suite C
West Jordan, UT 84088

Call For Free Consultation

(801) 676-5506


Call Us

Family Law Attorney Taylorsville Utah

Family Law Attorney Taylorsville Utah

The legal definition of family law in Taylorsville Utah is the collection of laws and legislation that relate to issues that have a serious and significant impact on family relationships. While family law is often seen as synonymous with handling divorce proceedings, the reality is that it encompasses a wide range of subjects that affect all areas of personal and family life. Family law lays out and protects the rights and responsibilities of family members across a wide spectrum of situations. It is designed to be a framework that provides a basis for achieving fair and equitable results for all family members involved, whether they are adults or children.

Family law can be an emotionally charged area of law, dealing as it often does with failing relationships and the resulting conflict. For this reason, family law solicitors require not only legal knowledge but also a good understanding of people and how to support them with appropriate sensitivity.

Reasons to Hire a Family Law Attorney in Taylorsville Utah

Most family lawyers represent clients in divorce proceedings and other matters related to divorce. But family law is a relatively broad practice area, including such issues as foster care and reproductive rights. Since family law matters hit so close to home, having a trusted legal professional by your side can help you ensure your loved ones are properly represented and protected during any legal process.

The most common reasons to hire a family law attorney include:

Divorce: Each partner hires his or her own attorney, who will help devise a settlement plan in order to avoid a trial. Divorce attorneys typically are skilled at dividing marital property, calculating spousal support, and proposing a plan for child custody, visitation, and support (if applicable).

Child Custody and Child Support: Court orders and settlement agreements involving both custody and support usually are included in the larger divorce case, but may be revisited as conditions change. For instance, child support may be altered after the non-custodial parent’s financial situation changes.

Paternity: In most cases, paternity cases are filed by the mother in an effort to secure child support payments from an absent father. But sometimes biological fathers file for paternity in order to have a relationship with their child. Paternity typically is determined through DNA testing.

Adoption: Adoption is a complex process that differs according to the type of adoption, where the child is from, variances in state laws, and other factors. Therefore, it’s important to consult with a family law attorney. Foster parents sometimes adopt their foster children, but the foster process does not necessarily require legal representation.

What is a Prenup?

A prenuptial agreement (“prenup” for short) is a written contract created by two people before they are married. A prenup typically lists all of the property each person owns (as well as any debts) and specifies what each person’s property rights will be after the marriage. In some states, a prenuptial agreement is known as an “ante nuptial agreement,” or in more modern terms, a “premarital agreement.” Sometimes the word “contract” is substituted for “agreement,” as in “prenuptial contract.” An agreement made during marriage, rather than before, is known as a “postnuptial,” “post marital,” or “marital” agreement. Contrary to popular opinion, prenups are not just for the rich. While prenups are often used to protect the assets of a wealthy fiancé, couples of more modest means are increasingly turning to them for their own purposes.

Reasons That Some People Want a Prenup:

Pass separate property to children from prior marriages. A marrying couple with children from prior marriages may use a prenup to spell out what will happen to their property when they die, so that they can pass on separate property to their children and still provide for each other, if necessary. Without a prenup, a surviving spouse might have the right to claim a large portion of the other spouse’s property, leaving much less for the kids.

Clarify financial rights. Couples with or without children, wealthy or not, may simply want to clarify their financial rights and responsibilities during marriage.

Avoid arguments in case of divorce. Or they may want to avoid potential arguments if they ever divorce, by specifying in advance how their property will be divided, and whether or not either spouse will receive alimony. (A few states won’t allow a spouse to give up the right to alimony, however, and, in most others, a waiver of alimony will be scrutinized heavily and won’t be enforced if the spouse who is giving up alimony didn’t have a lawyer.)

Get protection from debts. Prenups can also be used to protect spouses from each other’s debts, and they may address a multitude of other issues as well.

If you don’t make a prenuptial agreement, your state’s laws determine who owns the property that you acquire during your marriage, as well as what happens to that property at divorce or death. (Property acquired during your marriage is known as either marital or community property, depending on your state.) State law may even have a say in what happens to some of the property you owned before you were married. Under the law, marriage is considered to be a contract between the marrying couple, and with that contract comes certain automatic property rights for each spouse. For example, in the absence of a prenup stating otherwise, a spouse usually has the right to:

• share ownership of property acquired during marriage, with the expectation that the property will be divided between the spouses in the event of a divorce or at death

• incur debts during marriage that the other spouse may have to pay for, and

• share in the management and control of any marital or community property, sometimes including the right to sell it or give it away.

Making a Valid Prenup

As prenuptial agreements become more common, the law is becoming friendlier toward them. Traditionally, courts scrutinized prenups with a suspicious eye, because they almost always involved a waiver of legal and financial benefits by a less wealthy spouse and they were thought to encourage breakups. As divorce and remarriage have become more prevalent, and with more equality between the sexes, courts and legislatures are increasingly willing to uphold premarital agreements. Today, every state permits them, although a prenup that is judged unfair or otherwise fails to meet state requirements will still be set aside. However, because courts still look carefully at prenups, it is important that you negotiate and write up your agreement in a way that is clear, understandable, and legally sound. If you draft your own agreement, which we recommend, you’ll want to have separate lawyers review it and at least briefly advise you about it otherwise a court is much more likely to question its validity

Types of Adoption

Agency Adoptions: Agency adoptions involve the placement of a child with adoptive parents by a public agency, or by a private agency licensed or regulated by the state. Public agencies generally place children who have become wards of the state for reasons such as orphanage, abandonment, or abuse. Private agencies are sometimes run by charities or social service organizations. Children placed through private agencies are usually brought to the agency by a parent or parents who have or are expecting a child they want to give up for adoption.

Independent Adoptions: In a private, or independent, adoption, no agency is involved in the adoption. Some independent adoptions involve a direct arrangement between the birth parents and the adoptive parents, while others use an intermediary such as an attorney, doctor, or clergyperson. For most independent adoptions, whether or not an intermediary is involved, the adopting parents will usually hire an attorney to take care of the court paperwork. Most states allow independent adoptions, though many regulate them quite carefully.

Open adoption: This is an independent adoption in which the adoptive parents and birth parents have contact during the gestation period and the new parents agree to maintain some contact with the birth parents after the adoption, through letters, photos, or in-person visits.

Identified Adoptions: An identified, or designated, adoption is one in which the adopting parents and the birth mother find each other and then ask an adoption agency to take over the rest of the adoption process. The process is a hybrid of an independent and an agency adoption. Prospective adoptive parents are spared the waiting lists of agencies by finding the birth parent themselves, but they reap the benefits of the agency’s counseling services and experience with adoption legalities. Everyone may simply feel more comfortable if an agency is involved. Identified adoptions are available to parents in the states that ban independent adoptions.

International Adoptions: In an international adoption, the new parents adopt a child who is a citizen of a foreign country. In addition to satisfying the adoption requirements of both the foreign country and the parents’ home state in Taylorsville, the parents must obtain an immigrant visa for the child.

Stepparent Adoptions: In a stepparent adoption, a parent’s new spouse adopts a child the parent had with a previous partner. Stepparent adoption procedures are less cumbersome than agency or independent adoption procedures. The process is quite simple, especially if the child’s other birth parent consents to the adoption. If the other birth parent cannot be found or if he or she refuses to consent to the adoption, there is more paperwork to do and the adoptive parents may need an attorney.

Same-Sex Adoptions: Rules about same-sex couples vary from state to state. In states that have some form of recognition for same-sex relationships, same-sex couples may adopt children together and one partner may adopt the child of the other partner. In some states, the adoption can be done under the streamlined stepparent adoption procedures, making the process inexpensive, quick, and easy.

Relative (Kinship) Adoptions: In a relative adoption, also called a kinship adoption, a member of the child’s family steps forward to adopt. Grandparents often adopt their grandchildren if the parents die while the children are minors, or if the parents are unable to take care of the children for other reasons (such as being in jail or on drugs). In most states, these adoptions are easier than non-relative adoptions. If the adopted child has siblings who are not adopted at the same time, kinship adoption procedures usually provide for contact between the siblings after the adoption.

Adult Adoptions: In most states, it’s legal for one adult to adopt another as long as there’s at least a ten-year age difference and the parties can show why the adoption is in the interests of both the parties involved and the public good. Often, adult adoptions are stepparent adoptions that the family didn’t get around to when the younger person was a minor, but wants to complete in order to assure inheritance rights. Sometimes, older adults who don’t have children of their own meet younger persons who they wish to treat as their children for inheritance purposes. There are protections in place in many states requiring oversight of adult adoptions where caregivers of the elderly are involved, in order preventing elder financial abuse.

How Do I Change My Name In Taylorsville, Utah

You can change your name by following your state’s name change guidelines. While each state’s policy varies, the first step is to file a formal petition for a name change with your local court. You can ask the court if it supplies the forms. Otherwise, you may need to check online or consult with an attorney.

Complete the forms and hand them to the court clerk. Next, the court may require you to obtain official fingerprints and a background check through local law enforcement or the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Once you’ve completed your fingerprinting and background check, some states require you to set up and pay for a formal advertisement in the local newspaper or other publication. The purpose of advertising your name change is to inform your creditors and any other interested party of your intent to change your name. In most cases, the publication is a formality that doesn’t interfere with the name change process. Lastly, you’ll need to attend a formal hearing in front of a judge or magistrate. During the hearing, the judge will ask you your reasons for changing your name and will ask you, under oath, to verify that you’re not seeking a name change to commit fraud or for any other unlawful reason. If the judge is satisfied with your testimony, the court will issue the name change.

Whether you’ve changed your name on your own, by marriage, or with a court order, the most critical part of accomplishing a name change is letting others know. If you start a new job, apply for a new credit card, or begin school, use only your new name. Introduce yourself to new friends and acquaintances with your new name. You’ll also need to contact individuals and companies that have your previous name and contact information, including the following:

State and Federal Government Agencies

One of the first steps for any name change is for you to visit your state and other government agencies to have your name changed on their records. You may need to provide proof of your court order, marriage certificate, or judgment of divorce. In most cases, the best first steps you can take are to obtain a new driver’s license from the Department of Motor Vehicles and a Social Security card. Once you have a photo I.D. and a Social Security card, it’s usually easier to change your name with other institutions.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506
Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Estate Planning Holladay Utah

Technology Lawyer

Dividing Real Estate In Divorce

Bankrupt Medical Bills

Irrevocable Vs. Revocable Trusts

Bankruptcy Chapter 7 Utah

Family Law St. George Utah Office

Framily Law Ogden Utah Office

Taylorsville, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Taylorsville, Utah
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°39′18″N 111°56′58″WCoordinates40°39′18″N 111°56′58″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Settled 1848
Incorporated July 1, 1996
Named for John Taylor
Government

 
 • Mayor Kristie Overson
 • City Council Ernest Burgess, Anna Barbieri, Meredith Harker, Curt Cochran & Bob Knudsen
 • Presiding Judge Christopher Bown
Area

 • Total 10.85 sq mi (28.10 km2)
 • Land 10.85 sq mi (28.10 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,295 ft (1,309 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 60,448
 • Density 5,571.24/sq mi (2,151.17/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP codes
84129, 84123
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-75360[2]
GNIS feature ID 1433206[3]
Website http://www.taylorsvilleut.gov/

Taylorsville is a city in Salt Lake CountyUtah. It is part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. The population was 60,448 at the time of the 2020 census. Taylorsville was incorporated from the Taylorsville–Bennion CDP and portions of the Kearns metro township on July 1, 1996. The city is located adjacent to Interstate 215 and Bangerter Highway. It is located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley.

Taylorsville, Utah

About Taylorsville, Utah

Bus Stops in Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 3200 W @ 6385 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 3045 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 1531 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 5595 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in SLCC Transit Center (Bay F) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / Redwood Rd (EB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / 2200 w (WB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / 1900 w (EB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 1685 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 3460 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Atherton Dr @ 4533 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 6211 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Map of Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions in Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Driving Directions from Texas Roadhouse to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Walmart Supercenter to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Taylorsville High School to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from The Redwood to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Savers to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Eisenhower Junior High School to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from America First Credit Union (inside Walmart) to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Cafe Rio Mexican Grill to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Planet Fitness to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Atherton Park Apartments to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from U-Haul Neighborhood Dealer to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Little Caesars Pizza to Taylorsville, Utah

Reviews for Ascent Law LLC Taylorsville, Utah

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

John Logan

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We've gotten divorce and child custody work from Ascent Law since the beginning because of my ex. We love this divorce firm! Staff is gentle, friendly and skilled. Tanya knows her stuff. Nicole is good and Ryan is fun. Really, all the staff here are careful, kind and flexible. They always answer all my questions, explain what they're doing and provide great legal services. I personally think they are the best for divorce in Utah.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Jacqueline Hunting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I have had an excellent experience with Ascent Law, Michael Reed is an absolutely incredible attorney. He is 100% honest and straight forward through the entire legal process of things, he also has a wonderful approach to helping better understand certain agreements, rights, and legal standing of matters, to where it was easy to know whats going on the entire process. I appreciate the competency, genuine effort put forth, and assistance I received from Ascent and attorney Michael Reed, and I will be calling these guys if ever I have the need again for their legal assistance! 5star review Wonderful attorneys!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Anthony Ziegler

starstarstarstarstar (5)

This review is well deserved for Ryan and Josh. New clients should know they are worth the 5 star rating we give them. We needed 2 sessions from them because of the complexity of the matter, but they are both very passionate about his helping others in need.  My sister needed bankruptcy and I needed divorce.  Sometimes they go hand in hand but a large shout out to this team - also Nicole is one of the sweetest people you ever did meet - she offered me warm cookies!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Thomas Parkin

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Mike Anderson and his colleagues & staff are knowledgeable, attentive and caring. In a difficult and complex case that eventually went to trial, Mike was the voice of reason and the confidence I needed. His courtroom abilities are amazing and I felt his defense of me was incredible. His quick thinking and expertise allowed for a positive result when I felt the World was crumbling. His compassion, after the case, has helped me return to a good life. I trust Mike and his staff. They are friendly and very good at what they do.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Yeran Merry

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I worked with Attorney Alex and Paralegal Ami in my divorce case. I got to know the team very well over the course of two years. I cannot think of a better team to have worked with. Ami and Alex are not only exceptional law professions who are very knowledgeable and thorough, they are also the best human beings who empathize with the emotions I was experiencing. Alex was conscious of my budget and worked efficiently to try to reduce unnecessary legal expenses. My case also involved some dealings with a foreign country that Alex and his team had previously dealt with.  They did an amazing job addressing cultural barriers in a very respectful manner and did not fall short in quality of work or in standards when dealing with some of these new challenges. Ami deserves a medal for being extremely professional, calming, and compassionate when it is needed most.  When you need family law attorneys, call this firm. I now feel I can move forward with grace and dignity.

Share this Article

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.