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Funeral Planning

As part of our series on Estate Planning, I wanted to make sure that we talked about funerals and planning for them. You might be surprised at what your family knows, or more likely doesn’t know, about your funeral wishes. Furthermore, it can be a very emotional decision to make if you leave it to your family, which can cause tremendous problems between family members with different views. Save your family the grief of having to make these decisions for you, and put your wishes in writing.

Funeral Planning

A second major reason for setting your wishes down in writing is cost. Planning ahead of time to secure funeral services is often far less expensive than arrangements made after a person’s death.

What happens if I don’t leave written instructions for my funeral?

If you don’t write down your funeral wishes, state law will determine who gets to make the decision for you. This alone can cause a lot of unnecessary grief, but here is the typical order that most states will follow:

  • Spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Next of kin
  • Public administrator designated by a court

To many, this may seem like the right order, so why bother to write it down? Consider what happens if you have more than one child, your spouse predeceases you, and the children don’t agree. The dispute will likely go to court and cause serious discord within the family. Never rely on the state designating the right people; set your wishes down in writing and take the burden off of your family.

Shouldn’t I put my funeral wishes in my WILL?

No. Your WILL often won’t be read or accessible until several weeks, sometimes months, after your death. Wills should never be used to express desires and decisions that need to be dealt with soon after your death. Wills are more properly used for things like property distribution that can wait and aren’t time sensitive.

Where should I leave my written funeral instructions if I don’t do it in my estate plan?

The most common place people leave their funeral instructions is with the executor of their estate (also called Personal Representative), the person who is caring for you, and/or their attorney, with a copy sent to loved ones. It is crucial that even if you leave the official copies with an executor or attorney that you inform your loved ones to reduce the chances of a dispute arising if a loved one is sure you wanted something different. If your plans change over time, be sure to update those same people immediately.

What should I write in my funeral plan?

Most people’s funeral plans are guided by their ethnic, religious and cultural affiliations, but here are some ideas to consider when writing down your funeral plan:

  • Whether you wish to be cremated, buried and/or embalmed
  • The facility where you wish to be buried or cremated
  • The type of container you wish to be buried or cremated in
  • How your remains will be transported to the facility you select
  • Whether you wish to have any ceremony accompany your funeral
  • The details of any such ceremony
  • Whether you wish any pallbearers and who they will be
  • Whether you wish any sort of marker, such as a tombstone

What services are available from a mortuary?

Mortuaries and funeral homes typically handle almost all the details involving the disposal of a person’s remains, such as:

  • Retrieving and transporting the body from the place of death to the facility
  • Storing the body
  • Preparing the body for the funeral
  • Making any necessary funeral arrangements
  • Conducting the funeral ceremony

I want my funeral to be modest, what can I do to keep it cost-effective?

Funerals can be surprisingly expensive, and planning ahead can save you and your loved ones a lot of money. Determine during your life where you want to be buried, and consider paying for the services in advance if the facility will let you. This will involve quite a bit of shopping around to ensure that you are getting a good deal.

Another option that many people choose is funeral societies. The services offered by each society differ, but these societies offer valuable information on reputable funeral homes, explanation of legal rules and advice on how to make final arrangements. Generally, the society will let you predetermine what services you want at a set price. This allows you to be certain about how much your funeral will cost well in advance and plan accordingly.

Free Consultation with a Utah Estate Lawyer

If you are here, you probably have an estate issue you need help with, call Ascent Law for your free estate law consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

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Michael Anderson

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.