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Personal Bankruptcy

Personal Bankruptcy

Under the U.S. Constitution, you have the ability to relieve all or part of your debts when you can no longer meet your obligations to creditors and lenders. Two major types of personal bankruptcy apply to consumers. Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows debtors to discharge all or part of their debt. In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, debtors repay all or part of their debt based on a payment plan.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Under Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you can have all or part of your debts discharged after your liquid assets are used to repay some of the debt.

What Are Liquid Assets?

Liquid assets are assets in your possession that can be easily and quickly converted into cash. Common examples include any balance you may have in a checking or savings account. State law dictates what kinds of liquid assets must be used to pay back creditors—these are known as exempt (cannot be used to repay) and non-exempt (must be used to repay) assets. Your non-exempt liquid assets must be turned over to the courts to be distributed among your creditors as partial repayment of the debt you owe. After any non-exempt liquid assets have been distributed to your creditors, any remaining debt is discharged. You are no longer liable for any debt discharged, and you get to keep your exempt assets. Furthermore, neither creditors nor third-party collectors can attempt to collect these debts from you.

How Do I Qualify?

To qualify for Chapter 7, you must pass a means test proving that your income is less than the median income for your family size in your state. In addition to passing a means test, you must receive credit counselling from an approved credit counselling agency. You can find approved credit counselling agencies at the U.S. Trustee Program’s website. If you fail the means test, you will not be allowed to file Chapter 7. Instead, you can file Chapter 13.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Under Chapter 13, you repay all or part of your debt through a three-to-five-year repayment plan. When you make the personal bankruptcy filing, you will also submit a repayment plan to the court. After submitting the plan, you should begin making payments to the court (who then pays your creditors). This is required even if your plan hasn’t been approved. After a few weeks, there will be a hearing to approve your payment plan. While creditors can object to the payment amounts, the judge has the final say. After your plan has been approved, you’ll continue making payments to the court. Once you’ve completed your Chapter 13 payment plan, any remaining debt is discharged. You are no longer liable for discharged debts.

Reasons Why Some Choose Chapter 13 Over Chapter 7

You might choose to file Chapter 13, even if you could file Chapter 7. Some people choose to do this if they have secured debt, like a car loan, that they want to continue paying so they can keep their car. Since Chapter 7 bankruptcy requires you to give up certain liquid assets, Chapter 13 might be a better option if you want to keep these assets. Furthermore, if your income is above the median for your family size in your state, you will not be able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy. According to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, to file Chapter 13, you cannot have more than $922,975 in secured debt and $307,675 in unsecured debt. Also, like Chapter 7, you must receive credit counselling from an approved credit counseling agency.

Steps to File for Bankruptcy

It starts with compiling all your financial records – debts, assets, income, expenses – and listing them. This not only gives you a better understanding of your situation, but also gives anyone helping you (and eventually the court) a better understanding. The next step is to receive credit counseling within 180 days before filing your case. This is required step. You must obtain counseling from an approved provider listed on the United States Courts website. Most counseling agencies offer this service online or over the phone. The courts want you to do this to make sure you have exhausted all possibilities of finding a different way to handle your problem. It’s important to understand that credit counseling is required. You will receive a certificate of completion from the course and this must be part of the paperwork when you declare bankruptcy, or your filing will be rejected. Next, you file the petition for bankruptcy. If you haven’t done so at this point, this might be where you realize you need to find a bankruptcy lawyer. Legal counsel is not a requirement for individuals filing for either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but you are taking a serious risk if you choose to represent yourself. For one thing, you may not understand federal or state bankruptcy laws or be aware which laws apply to your case, especially regarding what debts can or can’t be discharged. Judges are not permitted to offer advice and neither are the court employees involved in a case.

There also are many forms to complete and some important differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 that you should be aware of when making decisions. Finally, if you don’t know and follow the proper procedures and rules in court, it could affect the outcome of your case. When your petition is accepted, your case is assigned to a court trustee, who sets up a meeting with your creditors. You must attend the meeting, but the creditors do not have to be there. This is an opportunity for them to ask you or the court trustee questions about your case. If you cannot afford to hire an attorney, you may have options for free legal services. If you need help finding a lawyer or locating free legal services, check with the American Bar Association for resources and information.

Where Bankruptcy Doesn’t Help

Bankruptcy does not necessarily erase all financial responsibilities. It does not discharge the following types of debts and obligations:
• Federal student loans
• Alimony and child support
• Debts that arise after bankruptcy is filed
• Some debts incurred in the six months prior to filing bankruptcy
• Taxes
• Loans obtained fraudulently
• Debts from personal injury while driving intoxicated
It also does not protect those who co-signed your debts. Your co-signer agreed to pay your loan if you didn’t or couldn’t pay. When you declare bankruptcy, your co-signer still may be legally obligated to pay all or part of your loan.

Bankruptcy Terms to Know

Throughout bankruptcy proceedings, you’ll likely come across some legal terms particular to bankruptcy proceedings that you’ll need to know. Here are some of the most common and important ones:

• Bankruptcy trustee: This is the person or corporation, appointed by the bankruptcy court, to act on behalf of the creditors. He or she reviews the debtor’s petition, liquidates property under Chapter 7 filings, and distributes the proceeds to creditors. In Chapter 13 filings, the trustee also oversees the debtor’s repayment plan, receives payments from the debtor and disburses the money to creditors.

• Credit counseling: Before you’ll be allowed to file for bankruptcy, you’ll need to meet either individually or in a group with a non-profit budget and credit counseling agency. Once you’ve filed, you’ll also be required to complete a course in personal financial management before the bankruptcy can be discharged. Under certain circumstances, both requirements could be waived.

• Discharged bankruptcy: When bankruptcy proceedings are complete, the bankruptcy is considered “discharged.” Under Chapter 7, this occurs after your assets have been sold and creditors paid. Under Chapter 13, it occurs when you’ve completed your repayment plan.

• Exempt property: Although both types of bankruptcy may require you to sell assets to help repay creditors, some types of property may be exempt from sale. State law determines what a debtor may be allowed to keep, but generally items like work tools, a personal vehicle or equity in a primary residence may be exempted.

• Lien: A legal action that allows a creditor to take, hold and sell a debtor’s real estate for security or repayment of a debt.

• Liquidation: The sale of a debtor’s non-exempt property. The sale turns assets into a “liquid” form — cash — which is then disbursed to creditors.

• Means test: The Bankruptcy Code requires people who want to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy to demonstrate that they do not have the means to repay their debts. The requirement is intended to curtail abuse of the bankruptcy code. The test takes into account information such as income, assets, expenses and unsecured debt. If a debtor fails to pass the means test, their Chapter 7 bankruptcy may either be dismissed or converted into a Chapter 13 proceeding.

• Reaffirmed account: Under Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you may agree to continue paying a debt that could be discharged in the proceedings. Reaffirming the account — and your commitment to pay the debt — is usually done to allow a debtor to keep a piece of collateral, such as a car, that would otherwise be seized as part of the bankruptcy proceedings.

• Secured debt: Debt backed by reclaimable property. For example, your mortgage is backed by your home, and for an auto loan, the vehicle itself is the collateral. Creditors of secured debt have the right to seize the collateral if you default on the loan.

• Unsecured debt: A debt for which the creditor holds no tangible collateral, such as credit cards.

What Can Bankruptcy Do for Me?

Bankruptcy may make it possible for you to:
• Eliminate the legal obligation to pay most or all of your debts. This is called a “discharge” of debts. It is designed to give you a fresh financial start.
• Stop foreclosure on your house or mobile home and allow you an opportunity to catch up on missed payments. (Bankruptcy does not, however, automatically eliminate mortgages and other liens on your property without payment.)
• Prevent repossession of a car or other property, or force the creditor to return property even after it has been repossessed.
• Stop wage garnishment, debt collection harassment, and similar creditor actions to collect a debt.
• Restore or prevent termination of utility service.
• Allow you to challenge the claims of creditors who have committed fraud or who are otherwise trying to collect more than you really owe.

What Doesn’t Bankruptcy Do?

Bankruptcy cannot, however, cure every financial problem. Nor is it the right step for every individual. In bankruptcy, it is usually not possible to:
• Eliminate certain rights of “secured” creditors. A “secured” creditor has taken a mortgage or other lien on property as collateral for the loan. Common examples are car loans and home mortgages. You can force secured creditors to take payments over time in the bankruptcy process and bankruptcy can eliminate your obligation to pay any additional money if your property is taken. Nevertheless, you generally cannot keep the collateral unless you continue to pay the debt
• Discharge types of debts singled out by the bankruptcy law for special treatment, such as child support, alimony, certain other debts related to divorce, some student loans, court restitution orders, criminal fines, and some taxes. (see Utah Non-Dischargeable Debts)
• Protect cosigners on your debts. When a relative or friend has co-signed a loan, and the consumer discharges the loan in bankruptcy, the cosigner may still have to repay all or part of the loan.- Discharge debts that arise after bankruptcy has been filed.
Can I Own Anything After Bankruptcy?
Yes. Many people believe they cannot own anything for a period of time after filing for bankruptcy. This is not true. You can keep your exempt property and anything you obtain after the bankruptcy is filed. However, if you receive an inheritance, a property settlement, or life insurance benefits within 180 days after your bankruptcy, that money or property may have to be paid to your creditors if the property or money is not exempt. You can also keep any property covered by Utah bankruptcy exemptions through the bankruptcy.

Will I Have to Go to Court?

In most bankruptcy cases, you only have to go to a proceeding called the “meeting of creditors” to meet with the bankruptcy trustee and any creditor who chooses to come. Most of the time, this meeting will be a short and simple procedure where you are asked a few questions about your bankruptcy forms and your financial situation. Occasionally, if complications arise, or if you choose to dispute a debt, you may have to appear before a judge at a hearing. If you need to go to court, you will receive notice of the court date and time from the court and/or from your attorney. To find the location of the court that serves your area visit the Utah Federal Bankruptcy Court Directory page.

Things to Know About Filing Bankruptcy

• Deadlines: Deadlines are critical in bankruptcy court. The rules in bankruptcy are very complex, can be technical, and all case deadlines must be met. Failing to file the appropriate forms or documentation on time may result in your case being dismissed or delayed.
• You need to qualify to file for bankruptcy: Many people who would have qualified for a Chapter 7 discharge before the 2005 changes must now use Chapter 13 instead, which involve repayment of some of your debts. This is determined using the Means Test.
• Repayment Plans: In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case a repayment plan that must be filed with the court. The court has a process that will determine exactly what income and expenses you have, and then calculate the reasonable expenses and monthly repayment amount for your case. In Utah this plan must be submitted to the court and confirmed.
• DIY Bankruptcy: Representing yourself in bankruptcy can be a huge mistake. The laws and the corresponding rules in bankruptcy can be very confusing, and many common errors could cost you a chance at a new financial start. An experienced attorney can help you determine the right laws to help you, represent you at the hearings and the meetings with creditors, and get most of the time save you money in the end.
• Focused Court: The Bankruptcy Court is a federal court which exclusively deals with bankruptcy cases. These courts are located around the United States, and they only handle bankruptcy cases and matters related to this legal area. You reside in an area that is served by a bankruptcy court.
• You get your own Trustee: The Department of Justice and the Bankruptcy Court will appoint a trustee in your case. This trustee will be responsible for overseeing your specific case and ensuring that all of the documentation is filed. The trustee is not in favour of either the consumer or creditors, but is an officer of the court instead.
• Get the best attorney: Choosing the right attorney that you can afford to represent you in bankruptcy court is very important and can affect the outcome of your case. You want a lawyer who will aggressively defend you and work hard to overcome any objections that may be presented by your creditors or the trustee. Experience is also very important, so you want an attorney who is very knowledgeable in bankruptcy law and that has been in the game for a long time.
• Your goal is a discharge: Another interesting thing to know about filing bankruptcy is that a bankruptcy discharge is an order issued by the bankruptcy court stating which of your debts are forgiven. Usually this will include most unsecured debts that have not been repaid are eliminated in the process unless you have reaffirmed your obligation.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

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About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.