fbpx
8833 South Redwood Road
Suite C
West Jordan, UT 84088

Call For Free Consultation

(801) 676-5506


Call Us

Should You Extend Credit to Business Customers?

Should You Extend Credit to Business Customers

Extending credit to your customers or business partners helps your business increase sales and provide additional sources of revenue. However, there are downsides to extending credit as well, such as having to comply with a variety of federal and state laws, and of the course the possibility of not being able to collect. This article provides some basic introductory information on extending credit to your business’s customers.

ID for Credit Transactions

Any business that accepts debit or credit cards for payment should understand the PCI security standards intended to protect consumers, credit card companies, banks, and businesses from fraud and security breaches. Any business that is going to accept credit or debit cards should obtain a complete list of the requirements from the PCI Security Standards Council.
Some states have strict regulations pertaining to the kind of information that customers can be asked for when purchasing items with credit cards. Very often, businesses can’t require customers to give information that is personally identifying other than an address or phone number. Exceptions may apply if the bank issuing the credit card requires the information, or if the information is essential to fulfilling the transaction, such as for delivery or servicing. If you would like more information about the laws in your state, you can visit the Utah Attorney General’s Website.

Consumer Credit Laws

If your business extends credit to customers, you should become aware of consumer credit laws, which regulate many aspects of your interaction with customers. For example, if your business is extending credit, you will have to comply with rules regarding how you advertise interest rates and how much time you have to respond to claims of billing mistakes. There are also certain rules about how aggressive you can be when trying to collect a debt. It’s important to be in compliance with federal and state consumer credit laws, so it’s definitely in your best interest to find out the laws that will be applicable to your business.

Extending Credit and Getting Paid

If you decide to extend credit to your customers, make sure you establish credit practices that are: (1) Fair enough to your customers under state and federal credit laws, and (2) Strict enough to ensure that your business will get paid.

You should have credit policy and a set procedure in place that your business will follow if customers don’t pay when they are supposed to pay. Examples of what you can include in your collection procedures are sending out overdue notices, demand letters, and collection notices.

Mechanics’ and contractors’ liens exist in most states to provide special collection rights to those who provide services or building materials used to improve property. A contractor’s lien is often referred to as a mechanic’s lien or a construction lien, and is available to contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers of materials. In some states, certain professions such as engineers, surveyors, and architects may also be eligible to file a lien for services that were provided in the course of a home improvement project. In the event that a debt is not paid, the lien can be foreclosed, and the property sold to pay the obligation.

It’s important to know that the debtor has the benefit of an “automatic stay” immediately upon filing a bankruptcy petition. This stops you from taking any further action to try to collect the debt owed to your business unless (or until) the bankruptcy court decides to the contrary.

Free Consultation with a Utah Business Lawyer

When you need legal help with your business, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Domestic Violence Law

Tax Audit Help

Regulations for Business

Trusts

Getting Property Back After Divorce

Behind On Your Mortgage?

Share this Article

Michael Anderson

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.