Children Who Smoke and Drink are Linked to Parents’ Divorce

Children Who Smoke and Drink are Linked to Parents’ Divorce

Researchers in a variety of studies have linked parents’ neglect, absence or divorce to bad behavior in their children, including smoking and drinking. Children who have lost a mother or father early in life (defined as before the age of seven) are far more likely to drink and smoke before or during their teen years, whether that loss was due to divorce, death or separation.

One study found that preteens who had lost a parent in some way were more than twice as likely to drink and smoke compared to children who had not had this experience. Many experts say that these behaviors are a coping mechanism and, in some cases, a form of self-medication.

The study involved an analysis of data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, which tracked health information for children born between 2000 and 2002. Researchers collected information on the involvement of the father in each child’s care and development. A survey of children at age 11 asked whether they had smoked or drank before. Those who drank also were asked if they had ever felt drunk. Of the 11,000 children who responded, about 25 percent had lost a parent in some way before age seven.

Preteens who experienced the absence of a parent before age seven were more than twice as likely to begin smoking and approximately 46 percent more likely to begin drinking.

Parents should pay close attention to kids’ behavior

This is not to say that all children whose parents divorce early in lives will start abusing substances in their teenage years. What it does indicate is that parents must make a big effort to stay involved in their kids’ lives, especially if they have experienced a major life change at an early age.

Do You Have to Answer Every Question at a Divorce Deposition?

At a divorce deposition, the other party’s attorney will be given the chance to ask you questions on a wide variety of subjects related to your divorce. These topics could include your overall health, your employment history, and your fidelity during the marriage, any debts or assets you own and anything else that could factor into the divorce. Your spouse is not allowed to interrupt you or to attempt to correct anything you say during this meeting.

Any answers you provide be truthful and entirely accurate.

Prepare for all types of questions

In most cases, you will have to answer any question asked of you — unless your attorney advises you not to do so. To that end, you should be prepared for some potentially uncomfortable subjects.

Before your deposition, spend some time with your lawyer preparing for how you will handle these difficult questions, and exactly they types of questions you can expect. An experienced attorney will prevent you from answering any inappropriate questions that could hurt your case. If you have any doubts about whether you should or should not respond, turn to your legal counsel.

Keep in mind that a court reporter will keep a record of your deposition. The transcript of your deposition contains all questions and answers, along with any objections your attorney makes. You should practice answering questions with your lawyer before the deposition.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

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