What Types Of Spousal Support Am I Eligible For?

What Types Of Spousal Support Am I Eligible For?

Spousal support (also called alimony) falls into two broad categories: short-term support and long-term or permanent support. “Reimbursement” support is a kind of long-term support. A spouse may also get temporary support before the divorce is final.

How long one ex-spouse must help support the other is as much in the judge’s discretion as is the amount of support. Some judges start with the assumption that support should last half as long as the marriage did, and then work up or down from there by looking at certain factors. Most states don’t have guidelines for the duration of support, but some do—for example, in Utah, payments are limited to three years except in special circumstances. In Utah, support can’t last any longer than the marriage did. And in some states the marriage must have lasted at least ten years for a court to order support at all. How long support lasts depends on the nature of the support.
It’s possible that a former spouse might receive more than one kind of support at the same time. If a spouse is getting more than one kind of support, say rehabilitative and short-term, then when the spouse is employed again, the rehabilitative support would end. The short-term support would continue until its termination date.

Temporary Support While the Divorce Is Pending

You and your spouse don’t need to wait until everything in your divorce is settled to work out spousal support arrangements. In fact, the support issue may be most important immediately after you separate, to support the lower-earning spouse while your divorce is in process.

It’s always a good idea to make a written agreement about temporary support. (For one thing, payments are tax deductible only if there’s a signed agreement.) If you can’t agree on a temporary support amount, then you’ll probably spend some time in court arguing over it. If you have a right to support, it starts as soon as you separate, so get yourself to court right away.

Short-Term and Rehabilitative Support

Judges order short-term support when the marriage itself was quite short. Short-term support lasts only a few years, and its precise ending date is set in the court order. Rehabilitative support, sometimes also called “bridge the gap” support, is a specific kind of short-term support, designed to help a dependent spouse get retrained and back into the workforce. It lasts until the recipient is back to work. Generally, that date isn’t set in advance—the agreement is that the support payments will stop when the recipient completes a retraining program and becomes employed in the industry. The recipient is responsible for diligently pursuing the training or course of study and then searching for work. The other spouse is responsible for paying the support until that point and a payer who suspects the recipient isn’t really trying to complete an education or get work can ask the court to reduce the support amount or set a termination date. The person asking for the modification would have to prove that the other ex-spouse was not working hard enough.

Long-Term or Permanent Support

Permanent support may be granted after long marriages (generally, more than ten years), if the judge concludes that the dependent spouse most likely won’t go back into the workforce and will need support indefinitely. Some states don’t allow permanent support. It’s odd, but in fact even so-called permanent support does eventually end. Of course, it ends when either the recipient or the payor dies. It also may end when the recipient remarries. And in about half the states, it ends if the recipient begins living with another person in a marriage-like relationship where the couple provides mutual support and shares financial responsibilities.

Reimbursement Support

Reimbursement support is the only type of spousal support that’s not completely based on financial need. Instead, it’s a way to compensate a spouse who sacrificed education, training, or career advancement during the marriage by taking any old job that would support the family while the other spouse trained for a lucrative professional career. Generally both spouses expected that once the professional spouse was established and earning the anticipated higher salary, the sacrificing spouse would benefit from the higher standard of living and be free to pursue a desirable career. If the marriage ends before that spouse gets any of the expected benefits, reimbursement support rebalances the scales by making the professional spouse return some of what was given during the marriage. Because it’s not tied to need, reimbursement support ends whenever the agreement or court order says it does. Its termination generally isn’t tied to an event like the supported spouse getting work or remarrying.

Financially Disadvantaged Spousal Support

The bottom line is that there needs to have been one partner or spouse who was financially disadvantaged as a result of the marriage, and the other partner or spouse benefitted off of the other’s disadvantage. The simplest way to break this down is to look at what I am going to refer to as a “traditional” marriage where the husband works and the wife does the work at home to keep the house and family going. In this situation the wife is not making an income and is therefore disadvantaged, whereas the husband is able to take advantage of the wife’s childcare so that he is able to work himself. So essentially here the wife did not have the opportunity to work outside of the house because of the role she played in the marriage. On the other side of the spectrum is a couple who both worked and had similar incomes and neither lost a work opportunity. In that case it is very unlikely that spousal support will be paid.

Obviously every marriage and roles within that relationship is different but it is the give and take that we look at where one partner or spouse’s giving leaves them in a financially disadvantaged circumstance and the other benefits from the give, there may be a claim for spousal support to compensate for that disadvantage.

Needs Based Spousal Support

There is another type of spousal support that is based out of need, rather than compensation. The basic idea is that where one party is unable to meet their needs after a separation, it should be the former spouse that financially supports that party rather than the government. This type of spousal support is meant to balance financial disparities between the parties for a time after the separation.

When considering the question of spousal support we look at the “financial needs and circumstances”. The circumstances that are considered include the length of the marriage, so the longer the marriage the stronger a claim for spousal support. We look at the incomes of both partners, but it is important to remember that just because one partner make significantly more than the other does not mean an automatic claim for spousal support. The roles that each played within the marriage is looked at to see if there was a disadvantage and subsequent advantage of the other partner. Lastly, the ongoing childcare is also considered meaning that if one partner is going to continue caring for the children then they may be entitled to spousal support above the child support that they will already receive.

How Much and How Long?

Once the “if” entitlement to spousal support is determined, the next question is the “how” – how much and for how long. Spousal support is not necessarily forever. The partner who receives the support is required to work to become self-sufficient while receiving the support. Once the partner reaches self-sufficiency the spousal support stops. Each circumstance is different and so the amount of time that it takes to reach self-sufficiency is different. For instance, someone who is coming out of that traditional marriage may be nearing 60-years-old, and may not have had a job for the past 30 years, so may never find self-sufficiency, nor should they be required to at such a late time in life. Budgets of living in two separate homes will have to be made to help determine how much spousal support is needed. Spousal support is tax deductible by those who pay it and is taxable for those that receive it. So when looking at the amount of spousal support to be paid it is a good idea to take a look at the tax consequences, especially when the partner paying tax is in a higher tax bracket.

Provincial Guidelines

There are Guidelines for Spousal Support in Nova Scotia. These guidelines can computer generate a range to give you an idea of the how long and how much spousal support should be paid. But these are guidelines and not rules or laws like the child support tables. This means that they are not always used by every judge. They are just another tool that may help separating spouses.

Other Thoughts on Alimony

I hope that you can see with so many moving parts in the consideration of spousal support that independent legal advice is essential before coming to any agreement. I always would advise going to a collaboratively-trained lawyer because we have collaborative colleagues who are financial professionals specially trained with arranging finances for the transition into two homes. Making an agreement outside of court through kitchen-table conversation with independent legal advice, collaborative law or mediation are, in my humble opinion, the most successful because you are able to tailor the spousal support to each of your needs and incomes and possibly take advantage of the tax consequences of spousal support.

When Does One Spouse Need to Pay Alimony?

When both spouses work full time, many judges will not award alimony. However, when one spouse is a “dependent” spouse, a North Carolina court may award alimony. The spouse with no income or less income will receive alimony from the spouse who has a greater income. Many times, when one spouse decided to stay at home and raise children, judges will award that spouse alimony until he or she can complete the education or job training necessary to obtain gainful employment. There are many factors the court must consider when deciding whether to require alimony payments, including the following:
• The earning capacity of each spouse
• Any marital misconduct on behalf of either of the spouses
• The age of the spouses
• The emotional condition and mental state of each of the spouses
• The earned and unearned income of each spouse, including medical benefits, insurance benefits, Social Security eligibility, wages, and dividends
• The length of the marriage
• Each spouse’s education level at the time of the divorce
• The potential necessity of one or both spouses to receive more training or education to find gainful employment and meet all reasonable financial needs
• The relative debt, liabilities, and assets of each spouse
• Either spouse’s contribution as being a homemaker
• The needs of each spouse
• The separate property each spouse brought to the marriage
• The tax consequences of an alimony award
• Any other factor that is relevant to the financial circumstances of the spouses that the family court finds to be just and proper to consider
• Any contribution that one spouse made to the increase earning power, education, or job skills of the other spouse
• How one spouse’s earning power, financial obligations, and expenses will be negatively affected by that spouse having custody of the couple’s children

How is Alimony Calculated?

The amount and duration of alimony are based on multiple factors under Utah law. When Utah courts examine the factors listed above, they have significant discretion. They may find one factor to be more pressing and important than the other factors. Or, they may determine that other factors are relevant to the couple’s financial circumstances. For example, if the spouses share a business together, or one spouse is part of a trust fund, they may consider those circumstances.

Utah judges also consider any so-called marital misconduct. Keep in mind that Utah judges have a wide range of discretion when it comes to determining when to award alimony and the amounts of the alimony payments. If you seek alimony, it is important that you have a dedicated attorney on your side who will represent your best interest.

What Constitutes Marital Misconduct?

As mentioned above, marital misconduct does come into a judge’s decision making process regarding alimony payments. Utah judges have the authority to decide not to award alimony to a spouse engaged in marital misconduct. Marital misconduct includes excessive drug or alcohol use, adultery, abandonment, or spending a significant amount of marital funds during the separation process.

What happens when one spouse has engaged in adultery?

Under Utah law, judges may require the spouse who will pay alimony to pay higher monthly payments when that spouse has committed adultery. Likewise, judges can require the spouse who committed adultery to pay alimony for a longer time. When the lower-income earner committed adultery before the separation, the judge could bar him or her from recovering alimony. When a higher-income spouse seeks to bar the lower-income spouse from receiving alimony due to adultery, the higher-earning spouse must not have committed adultery.

How Is Spousal Support Calculated?

Utah courts utilize a formula to determine the amount of temporary spousal support that the spouse requesting it will need. For permanent spousal support, however, the court will analyze the specific details of the case to determine the final spousal support amount.

Utah courts consider the following to calculate spousal support:
• The length of the marriage
• Each spouse’s needs as well as their standard of living during the marriage
• The age and health of each spouse
• Debts and assets of the spouses
• Whether one of the partners assisted the other with obtaining an education or professional training
• Whether there was domestic violence in the marriage
• What the tax impact of spousal support will be

The Importance of Earning Capacity & Standard of Living

A judge will closely examine how much income each spouse can earn based on their current education, professional training, and skill set to keep the same standard of living they had during the marriage. Based on this, the judge will analyze how marketable the spouse is and what job opportunities are available for them. The judge will also determine the time and expense it will take for the spouse to get a job.

Length in Marriage

The length that a person has to pay for spousal support is heavily based on the length of the marriage. In most cases, the time period ordered to pay spousal support will be one-half length of the marriage. However, if the marriage was longer than 10- years, the court might not set an end date to the spousal support.

How to Create a Spousal Support Agreement

It is possible for spouses to work together to create a spousal support agreement. In order to create a spousal support agreement, the couple must create and sign a written agreement or stipulation without having to go in front of a judge. This is beneficial for spouses who don’t want a judge to decide for them and want to work on the agreement together. However, the court will have to accept and sign your agreement for it to be official.

To create a spousal support agreement, follow these steps:
1. Decide on the amount and duration of the spousal support
2. Write up your agreement.
3. Sign your agreement
4. Turn in your agreement to the court for the judge to sign
5. File your agreement/stipulation after the judge signs it

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506


Recent Posts

Who Gets Custody Of Child In Divorce Salt Lake?

Retirement Planning For Women

How Is Child Custody Determined?

Are Prenuptial Agreements A Good Idea?

Equal Rights For Fathers And Mothers

My Spouse Left The State With My Child, What Do I Do?

Alimony Lawyer in St. George Utah

Alimony Attorney in Ogden Utah

West Jordan Utah Divorce Attorney

West Jordan Utah Divorce Attorney

If you are looking for a Divorce Attorney in West Jordan Utah, you’ve come to the right website. West Jordan was on of the earliest Utah pioneer settlements after the founding of Salt Lake City. The community’s roots begin in the later part of 1849 when some pioneers began spreading out in the Salt Lake valley. West Jordan’s original unofficial area included most of the valley on the West Side of the Jordan River, and about a three-mile strip on the east side of the river past State Street in an area now occupied by Midvale, Sandy and the former Crescent area. West Jordan’s name captures some of the flavor of what the Mormon pioneers considered their promised land. They saw strong similarities in this arid western desert and the biblical lands. Both contained fresh water lakes (Sea of Galilee and Utah Lake) and dead salt water rivers (River Jordan and Utah River.) This similarity in geological features led to this area being referred to as a western Jordan and the southern part of the valley as the Jordan Valley.

Brigham Young reinforced this concept when he renamed the Utah River the West Jordan River, which was shortened through time and use to the Jordan River. The first settlers in the present area known as West Jordan were the Marius Ensign, Thomas Butterfield, and Samuel Egbert families. Other settlers soon followed. In 1850 Archibald Gardner and his brother Robert built a 2.5 mile millrace (canal) to bring water out of the Jordan River to the area of 7800 South. The water thus channeled was to provide a source of power for the saw mill they built the following year. Before long the population began to cluster near this general area and other enterprises were built and operated such as a flour mill, woolen mill, and tannery. Many settlers initially built dugouts to live in near the crest of the hill overlooking the river bottoms where farming was done. Although the original flour mill was burned by fire, it was rebuilt and still stands. During the 1980’s it was converted into a fine furniture and delightful gift shop before a quality restaurant was added as well as a little village complex on the adjoining land. About one hundred yards to the Southwest of the flour mill, stands the first non-log chapel in Salt Lake Valley outside Salt Lake City. It took years of construction (1861-1867) before completion and dedication by Brigham Young. This building was known as the Rock Meeting House. It served most of settlements in the south end of the valley on both sides of the river and was used for many activities besides church. In fact to help finance the roof, a grand ball was held and officers from Fort Douglas were invited to participate. Dancing was a favorite pastime of the pioneers. In addition the building was used for school and other community activities and social events. Today the structure remains basically unchanged from the way the pioneers built it. Although the city of West Jordan now owns the property, it is operated by The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, who make it available through rental to the public. Over the past three decades, its has also been used by other religions coming into the area.

The building, now known as Pioneer Hall, adjoins the West Jordan Cemetery, which is one of two in the community with pioneer origins. The second is the small Wight’s Forts cemetery located on 9000 South at 3449 West. In 1872 a major multicommunity cooperative effort was launched to build canals throughout the valley to provide water. This in turn provided the initial means for further growth in farming, settlement and other related development. West Jordan was also the site of some of the very earliest airplane flights in the west, which commenced in 1909 and continued through 14 March 1910. These experimental flights were made by L. R. Culver about six years after the Wright brothers flew their airplane at Kitty Hawk in 1903. Culver, a farmhand, built the aircraft in a farm equipment shed near 1700 West and 9000 South. At first a glider was constructed, then a motor was added to power the craft. His most successful flight was about fifty feet off the ground and lasted for about fifteen to twenty minutes. Much of Utah’s sugar beet history and production was centered in West Jordan due to the large sugar factory built and operated in the community for many years. West Jordan also had been known for its fur industry, which has mostly disappeared due to urbanization. In the sports world, several West Jordan boxers gained national and international recognition, ranking and titles under the management of Marvin Jenson. Most notably native-son Gene Fullmer twice won the World Middle Weight Boxing Championship. Other fighters of note include AAU champions Floyd Richardson and Rex Layne (also a top professional contender), Olympic champion Jay Lambert, and Gene Fullmer’s brother Don, who also fought for the Middle-weight championship. In politics, West Jordan was the home of Jean M. Westwood, when she was chosen to chair the National Democratic party on 14 July 1972, the first woman in America to chair a major national political party. It was 10 January 1941 before the town of West Jordan, with a population of less than 2,000, was officially incorporated. In the late 1960s the community began growing at such a rate it became one of the fastest growing small communities in the United States. By 1990 the population had reached 42,912. During this time the community has developed a degree of economic diversity with segments of industrial and commercial development along with its population growth. In the process, over a dozen community parks have been acquired and developed. This push to strengthen quality of life for citizens is also reflected in a recent successful proposal that brought it together with its sister city, South Jordan, to win the location site for a new 100-acre Salt Lake Community College campus, which will be built straddling the cities’ shared border.

Utah Lawmakers Clarify Role Of Fault In Divorce Alimony Awards

In many marriages, one partner makes more significant financial contributions to the relationship. When the marriage ends in divorce, this partner may be required to pay spousal support, otherwise known as alimony, so that the other partner can maintain a standard of living more similar to that enjoyed during the marriage. In West Jordan, Utah, courts may consider many factors in deciding whether to award spousal support, such as the recipient’s earning capacity and current financial situation, the individual paying alimony’s ability to provide spousal support, the length of the marriage, and whether the recipient helped increase the individual paying alimony’s earning capacity during the marriage by supporting him or her through higher education. Interestingly, while West Jordan Utah is a no-fault divorce state (meaning that neither party has to show wrongdoing to dissolve the marriage), Utah courts can consider fault when setting alimony. However, courts had long struggled with how to properly define fault in making a spousal support award. Now, thanks to a new law passed in the West Jordan Utah legislature, judges will have an easier time determining what qualifies as wrongdoing when setting an alimony award.
The initiative to define fault in setting alimony started as House Bill 338, and after approval in the state House and Senate, became law in Title 30, Chapter 3, and Section 5 of the Utah Code. The fault determination is two-part: first, one or more acts of specifically listed wrongful conduct must have been engaged in during the marriage, and second, the act or acts must have “substantially contributed to the breakup of the marriage relationship” (In other words, the wrongful conduct must have played an important role in causing the divorce).

The wrongful conduct listed in the statute includes:
• Having sex with anyone other than the person’s spouse
• Physically harming, or attempting to cause harm, to the other spouse or to children who were still minors
• Causing the other spouse or the minor children to fear life threatening harm (this fear must be reasonable under the circumstances, meaning that in the same situation a normally prudent person would have feared life threatening harm)
• Undermining, in a significant manner, the financial stability of the spouse or of the children

Generally, conduct must have been knowing and intentional to come into play in an alimony decision. For example, a spouse who accidentally caused his or her spouse and children to reasonably fear life threatening harm by being involved in an auto accident while driving the family car would likely not have to worry about such an incident being used as leverage in a spousal support determination. If fault is at issue, the court may, in its discretion, close the proceedings, and may also seal the records when the proceedings are complete.

Alimony In West Jordan, Utah

Under Utah law, the court may award alimony to either spouse. The court will examine the circumstances in the case, including whether either party’s behavior caused the marital failure. Alimony may be granted on a temporary basis as well as permanently after entry of the divorce decree. The longer the marriage, the more likely alimony will be awarded. Utah courts determine alimony on a case-by-case basis by looking at the financial situation of each spouse. The courts generally compare the earning capacities. The court requests a financial statement from both spouses to assess their financial needs and conditions. The court then examines the income and debts of the payor spouse. These factors are crucial in determining if alimony will be awarded, and how much alimony the recipient receives. Alimony may be reviewed and modified if the parties’ conditions change. Alimony terminates automatically upon remarriage or cohabitation by the recipient. The party seeking modification due to change of circumstances must provide proof of changed circumstances.
The court may consider the marital misconduct of the parties – fault – in determining alimony. Except in unusual circumstances, Utah courts do not order alimony for a period that exceeds the length of the marriage. The court considers the standard of living that existed at separation. For short marriages with no children, the court may consider the standard of living that existed when the marriage began. A party who pays alimony is allowed to claim the payments as a deduction on federal tax forms. The party receiving alimony is required to claim it as income on federal tax forms.

Types of Alimony In West Jordan

Courts may order temporary, short- and long-term alimony. Temporary alimony is granted at the discretion of the court during the divorce proceedings and before the final decree. Short-term alimony may be granted to allow the receiving party time to gain necessary skills. Long-term, or permanent, alimony may be granted to a spouse who has significant needs, and is usually reserved for lengthy marriages.

Factors Considered by the Court

Alimony in West Jordan Utah is discretionary. According to the Utah Code – Sections: 30-3-3, 30-3-5, the court considers at least the following factors in determining the length of time and amount of alimony to be awarded:
• the financial condition and needs of the recipient spouse;
• the earning capacity or income potential;
• the reasonability of the paying spouse to pay;
• the duration of the marriage;
• whether the recipient spouse has custody of minor children requiring support;
• whether the recipient spouse worked in a business owned or operated by the payor spouse; and
• whether the desiring spouse contributed to the earning capacity of the paying spouse.

Utah Marital Property Laws

During marriage, couples acquire the rights to some of the property and assets, as well as debts, acquired by one or both of them. Marital property doesn’t include things that are considered “separate property” owned by either spouse, for example, property owned before marriage, inheritance, gifts, property specifically excluded by valid prenuptial agreements, and property gained after legally separating. In addition, keep in mind that you are also on the hook still for your separate debts from before marriage.

Equitable Distribution vs. Community Property

There are two ways states divide marital property: equitable distribution and community property. Utah is an equitable distribution or common law state, which is the majority marital property legal system. This means marital property in West Jordan Utah isn’t automatically assumed to be owned by both spouses and therefore should be divided equally in a divorce. In West Jordan Utah, marital property is divided “equitably” or fairly, which may not be an even 50-50. Usually for longer marriages, it is about 50% to each party. For short-term marriages, the court generally puts people back to their position before the marriage, such as giving people what they had before the marriage and typically what they made during the marriage. Parties can agree on how they want to divide the property outside of court, but a judge will review it to ensure it’s fair.
The Pros And Cons Of Hiring A Divorce Attorney In West Jordan, Utah
Divorce is a tough time for everyone. Even if you think that you can go at it alone, it is always a good idea to have someone by your side. A divorce attorney provides you with the legal and emotional support you need to get through such a difficult time in your life. Although it is always advised to hire a divorce attorney to help you throughout the divorce process, there are some reasons why a person would not want to hire one. If you have decided to get a divorce and are wondering whether it is vital to hire a divorce attorney, you need to read on. Just like with any other legal procedure, there are both pros and cons of hiring a divorce attorney. It is important to know about these before you consider hiring one. The following are some of the pros of hiring a divorce attorney.
Pros Of Hiring A Divorce Attorney

Knows The Procedure

Divorce attorneys are specialized in family law, especially the part which focuses on divorce. They are up to date with regards to all the latest developments in divorce law. Each state has different laws and having a divorce attorney helps ensure that you someone on your side who knows the entire procedure. The divorce lawyer would know exactly how a divorce would be handled in the jurisdiction of your residence. There are many rules and regulations in every state. This is why when you have a divorce attorney working for you, you get to take advantage of his or her expertise.

Handles The Paperwork

Just like any other legal procedure, there are a lot of paperwork involved in a divorce. The divorce attorney would know when and how to file motions and petitions at the court. Keep in mind that there is a ton of paperwork that is involved in a divorce and it determines the outcome of your divorce. Therefore, when you hire a divorce attorney, you can be rest assured knowing that the attorney would know what to file, when to file, and what to request.
Experienced Negotiator
Negotiations are something that experienced divorce attorneys excel in. It can be tough to negotiate important issues like child custody, spousal support, and property division on your own. Furthermore, it state has its own laws that relate to these issues. Hence, you need to hire a divorce attorney as he or she will skillfully negotiate the terms of the divorce settlement.
Familiar With The Local Court
The local judge does not care if it is your first time defending yourself in court. You will be treated just like any other lawyer. However, when you hire a divorce attorney, he or she would know local attorneys and judges, and would also be familiar with the local court procedure. This will help improve your chances of receiving a verdict that in your best interests. Moreover, navigating the court system on your own can be extremely difficult, but with a divorce attorney, you do not have to worry about that.
Saves Money In The Long Run
Despite the high fees, there is a reason why people seek the help of a divorce attorney. When you hire a divorce attorney, you get to hire someone who has the experience and expertise needed to professionally fight for your best interests. Thus, you will end up saving a lot of money in the long-run. Moreover, important issues such as child custody and spousal payments would not be dragged on for years. Instead, the attorney will help ensure that everything is settled in your best interests. Hence, you will save a lot of money.
Impartial Expert Advice
When you hire a divorce attorney, you have an impartial third party whom you can ask for expert advice. As the attorney would not be emotionally invested in your case, you will receive expert advice that is unbiased and solely focuses on the legal issues. Besides, you do not need to worry about the lawyer making any decisions based on emotions. It is strictly business with a divorce attorney.
Less Stressful
Finally, one of the main reasons why people hire a divorce attorney in the first place is because it is less stressful when you have an experienced professional fighting for your best interests. Having a good divorce attorney will lessen the level of stress you might be facing. Hence, hiring a divorce attorney is good for your mental health and wellbeing.
Cons Of Hiring A Divorce Attorney
Although it is great to have a divorce attorney by your side, it might not always be a good idea to hire one. Some of the cons associated with hiring a divorce lawyer are mentioned below.

May Cause Drama
If you hire a divorce attorney without consulting with your spouse or at least informing him or her, you can expect a lot of drama. Your spouse might read hiring an attorney as a sign that you do not trust him or her, and are only in it for yourself. Moreover, your spouse would think that since you have a lawyer, you would take serious action against him or her. Thus, it could potentially ruin what is left of your relationship with your partner. This is something that you have to consider before you hire a divorce attorney.
Expensive
There is no denying that hiring a divorce attorney is expensive. There are a ton of fees and extra costs that you have to pay, especially if the divorce is drawn out and messy. But, at the same time, it is always a good idea to have professional legal assistance when things get messy. You need to consider the cost as a one-time cost unlike the costs you would have to pay consecutively in the future, once the verdict has been reached. You might end up with heavy spousal support payments and difficulty in getting to visit your child.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

What Is A Hardship Discharge In Chapter 13?

What Is The Point Of Probate?

Utah Divorce Code 30-3-35.5

State And Federal Firearms Laws

Utah Divorce Code 30-3-36

Defense Lawyers Near Me

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

West Jordan, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
West Jordan, Utah
City
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 40°36′23″N 111°58′34″WCoordinates40°36′23″N 111°58′34″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Settled 1848
Incorporated 1941
Named for Jordan River
Government

 
 • Mayor Dirk Burton [1]
Area

 • Total 32.33 sq mi (83.73 km2)
 • Land 32.33 sq mi (83.73 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,373 ft (1,333 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 116,961
 • Density 3,617.72/sq mi (1,396.88/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP codes
84081, 84084, 84088
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-82950[3]
GNIS feature ID 1434086[4]
Website www.westjordan.utah.gov

West Jordan is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. It is a suburb of Salt Lake City and has a mixed economy. According to the 2020 Census, the city had a population of 116,961,[5] placing it as the third most populous in the state.[6] The city occupies the southwest end of the Salt Lake Valley at an elevation of 4,330 feet (1,320 m). Named after the nearby Jordan River, the limits of the city begin on the river’s western bank and end in the eastern foothills of the Oquirrh Mountains, where Kennecott Copper Mine, the world’s largest man-made excavation, is located.

Settled in the mid-19th century, the city has developed into its own regional center. As of 2012, the city has four major retail centers; with Jordan Landing being one of the largest mixed-use planned developments in the Intermountain West.[7] Companies headquartered in West Jordan include Mountain America Credit Union, Lynco Sales & Service, SME Steel, and Cyprus Credit Union. The city has one major hospital, Jordan Valley Medical Center, and a campus of Salt Lake Community College.

City landmarks include Gardner Village, established in 1850, and South Valley Regional Airport, formerly known as “Salt Lake Airport #2”. The airport serves general aviation operations as well as a base for the 211th Aviation Regiment of the Utah Army National Guard flying Apache and Black Hawk helicopters.

West Jordan, Utah

About West Jordan, Utah

Bus Stops in West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 8739 S West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in West Jordan City Center Stn (Bay A) West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 2320 W West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 9000 S @ 3181 W West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4800 West Station (Bay B) West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 3050 W West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Jordan Valley Station (Bay C) West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Sugar Factory Road Station (Bay B) West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pky (10400 S) @ 4518 W West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 7521 S West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 3208 W West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 8001 S West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Map of West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions in West Jordan, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Driving Directions from Gardner Village to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Petco to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Layers Bedding at Gardner Village to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Deseret Industries Thrift Store & Donation Center to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Walgreens to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Little Caesars Pizza to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Archibald’s Restaurant at Gardner Village to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Centurion Technologies Inc to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from West Jordan High School to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Broadview College - Formerly Broadview University to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from Embarc at West Jordan to West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions from US Mine Safety & Health Administration to West Jordan, Utah

Reviews for Ascent Law LLC West Jordan, Utah

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

John Logan

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We've gotten divorce and child custody work from Ascent Law since the beginning because of my ex. We love this divorce firm! Staff is gentle, friendly and skilled. Tanya knows her stuff. Nicole is good and Ryan is fun. Really, all the staff here are careful, kind and flexible. They always answer all my questions, explain what they're doing and provide great legal services. I personally think they are the best for divorce in Utah.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Jacqueline Hunting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I have had an excellent experience with Ascent Law, Michael Reed is an absolutely incredible attorney. He is 100% honest and straight forward through the entire legal process of things, he also has a wonderful approach to helping better understand certain agreements, rights, and legal standing of matters, to where it was easy to know whats going on the entire process. I appreciate the competency, genuine effort put forth, and assistance I received from Ascent and attorney Michael Reed, and I will be calling these guys if ever I have the need again for their legal assistance! 5star review Wonderful attorneys!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Anthony Ziegler

starstarstarstarstar (5)

This review is well deserved for Ryan and Josh. New clients should know they are worth the 5 star rating we give them. We needed 2 sessions from them because of the complexity of the matter, but they are both very passionate about his helping others in need.  My sister needed bankruptcy and I needed divorce.  Sometimes they go hand in hand but a large shout out to this team - also Nicole is one of the sweetest people you ever did meet - she offered me warm cookies!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Thomas Parkin

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Mike Anderson and his colleagues & staff are knowledgeable, attentive and caring. In a difficult and complex case that eventually went to trial, Mike was the voice of reason and the confidence I needed. His courtroom abilities are amazing and I felt his defense of me was incredible. His quick thinking and expertise allowed for a positive result when I felt the World was crumbling. His compassion, after the case, has helped me return to a good life. I trust Mike and his staff. They are friendly and very good at what they do.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Yeran Merry

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I worked with Attorney Alex and Paralegal Ami in my divorce case. I got to know the team very well over the course of two years. I cannot think of a better team to have worked with. Ami and Alex are not only exceptional law professions who are very knowledgeable and thorough, they are also the best human beings who empathize with the emotions I was experiencing. Alex was conscious of my budget and worked efficiently to try to reduce unnecessary legal expenses. My case also involved some dealings with a foreign country that Alex and his team had previously dealt with.  They did an amazing job addressing cultural barriers in a very respectful manner and did not fall short in quality of work or in standards when dealing with some of these new challenges. Ami deserves a medal for being extremely professional, calming, and compassionate when it is needed most.  When you need family law attorneys, call this firm. I now feel I can move forward with grace and dignity.

What Is The Best Way To Get Divorced?

What Is The Best Way To Get Divorced

How quickly a party can get divorced will first depend upon his or her state’s waiting period, or the amount of time the state requires a person filing for divorce to wait until the Court will grant the divorce. Some states have no waiting period, while others have waiting periods of up to two years. To determine what the waiting period in your state is, check the ‘effective waiting period for no-fault divorce’ column for your state on this chart provided by Americans for Divorce Reform. The amount of time it takes a couple to divorce also depends on how quickly the parties can come to an agreement and complete the procedure for divorce.

Starting the Divorce Process

• Fill out a Summons: The first step in getting a divorce is telling the court that you would like to dissolve your marriage. The specifics of this will depend on your state and county, so contact your local court to obtain the correct papers. There may be additional forms such as a marriage petition, property declaration, or other declarations pertaining to your relationship. Make sure you have found all the forms necessary for filing in your state. Fill out the papers on a computer or using blue or black ink as clearly as possible. If you find the forms difficult to navigate you may want to consider hiring someone to assist you. If you and your spouse are separating amicably, agree which one of you will start the process as court proceedings usually have a plaintiff and defendant (or petitioner and respondent). It does not matter much, but the plaintiff may have slightly more to do. Some states do also allow Joint Petitioning, in the simplest cases. If you have no children and little shared property, check if there is a marriage dissolution packet available at your local court.
• Have the dissolution forms reviewed: There are many states that offer free legal advice at family courts so take advantage if it is available to you. You can also consider hiring legal counsel to make sure the process goes smoothly. Some attorneys can be hired just to help with certain tasks, and in some cases paralegals can be hired to complete forms, so it does not have to be as expensive as you might think.
• Make additional copies: Keep a copy of the summons for yourself. You will also need a copy for your spouse. The original is to be filed with the court.
• File the papers: You will turn in the original as well as the copies to the county clerk. Your papers will be reviewed and, presuming everything is in order, stamped as “filed.” The court will retain the original summons and any other papers as the official beginning of divorce proceedings. They will return the copies for both parties to you with the “filed” stamp. This stamp means your divorce is officially underway.

• Serve your spouse: Whether you and your significant other have been in contact during this process or not, the court needs to know that your spouse is officially aware that the divorce is a concern of the court. Your spouse can receive their copy of the papers from anyone over 18, other than you. It can be a friend or family member, or a hired professional server. The plaintiff is not allowed to serve the papers. In many states you can also deliver them by certified mail, as long as the other party is willing to fill out an acknowledgment of receipt form.
• File proof of service: If your spouse receives the forms from a personal server, the server has to provide you with a form attesting to this that can be filed with the court. If your spouse accepted service by mail, it may be your duty to file the return receipt with the court.
Coming to an Agreement
• Decide with your spouse that you want to make an agreement: In order to get a quick and easy divorce in any state, you will need to write up an agreement with your spouse on all contestable issues. If you are at odds emotionally or practically from the start, it will be difficult to work out these details. In many cases it may be useful to hire a mediator to assist you even when things seem straightforward. A mediator is a legal professional who works for both of you. If you have children or complex finances you may also want to consider hiring lawyers to draw up your divorce contract even if you are in general agreement. The right lawyer does not have to make the divorce into a battle but can just make sure you are filing things to your best interests. If you hire lawyers, each side should have their own, although they can still work amicably.
• Reach an agreement about property distribution: You will need to decide who gets every piece of personal and real property that you, your spouse, or the two of you own. This includes but is not limited to bank and investment accounts, vehicles, and real estate. Anything which is legally owned would most easily be divided in half or according to the party whose name is on it, but sometimes married couples do not worry about putting names on property with a concern for possible separation. Be fair about the how the property was understood during the marriage. This also includes personal items, furnishings, gifts, artwork and memorabilia.
• Divide any debt fairly: Debts accrued during the marriage should be divided between you and spouse according to each party’s ability to pay the debt, who incurred the debt, and how much property each party is receiving. A mortgage is often one of the most complicated debts to divide. If it is possible to sell the house, all that has to be agreed is the division of funds, but if one party intends to keep the house, they will have to keep the debt as well, and the bank has to approve that. In some cases, the house may have to be sold even if that wasn’t the original plan, simply because one party cannot shoulder the full mortgage alone. Credit card debt should be divided at separation, even if it is just onto other credit cards. Try not to keep your finances entangled. In some states, even credit card debt that is not in your name but that was incurred by your spouse during the marriage may be your liability.
• Consider alimony or spousal support: If you or your spouse has been out of the workforce in order to raise children, take care of a family member, or because of a disability, alimony or spousal support may be warranted. Be careful when agreeing to pay alimony or spousal support, as you may not be able to modify that agreement later

• Reach an agreement on child custody and visitation rights: If you have children, you will need to decide which party the children will live with (the custodial parent) and how often and when the children will visit with the other party (the non-custodial parent). Most states have plans or worksheets of some kind available to help couples come to agreements on this issue. Some states will leave the issue more open but still provide assistance to make the best decision for the child. Check what the law requires in your state’s parenting guidelines.
• Come to an agreement on child support: All states have laws, which presume that the non-custodial parent should pay child support to the custodial parent. To determine how much child support should be paid in your situation, check your state’s website for a child support worksheet or calculator. You can locate your state’s website by following the appropriate link from the Internal Revenue Service’s (“IRS”) State Government Websites page.
• Write up your agreement: As you make these decisions, keep things in writing, and when you have covered everything, type up the official agreement so that both of you are satisfied with the language and level of detail. Check with your local court whether to have such a document signed and notarized, or whether it will be more useful referentially for filling out official court forms.

Filing Divorce Papers
• Locate the proper forms: Many states offer state-approved forms for uncontested or agreed divorces. Other states do not, so you may have to spend some time and possibly some money to obtain the correct forms. To locate the proper forms Visit your state’s website by following the appropriate link from the Internal Revenue Service’s (“IRS”) State Government Websites page. Use a search engine to search “your state divorce forms”. Check with your County Clerk’s Office. If the forms aren’t available online, call or stop in and ask for a copy of the forms you need.
• Complete the forms: Follow all of the instructions that came with your forms. If you did not get instructions, try to answer every question as completely as possible, while remaining brief. Type or print in blue or black ink when filling out court forms. Write clearly and do not skip portions. Divorce papers will often include several affidavits or unclear legalistic forms, so be prepared to spend some time getting things in order. If you need help, check with the court clerk and/or local bar association to see if your jurisdiction offers free or low cost assistance to pro-se parties.
• File the forms with the proper court: Your forms should be filed in the county in which you or the other party resides. Check with the court clerk’s office if you are unsure which court in your county handles divorces. You will need to submit more than one copy of each form as well as a filing fee, so call the Clerk’s office first, to find out how many copies of each document you should bring, what the filing will be, and what forms of payment are accepted.
• Attend any necessary hearings: Uncontested or agreed divorces generally do not require the parties to appear in court, but some jurisdictions may conduct a brief hearing. Be sure to attend any hearings the court schedules and bring any documentation it requests. Be punctual if you are required to attend any official hearings. Plan your day so that you can be sure to arrive early.
• Dress conservatively: You don’t need to go out and buy a new suit or outfit – just find a clean, well fitting, and as respectable as possible set of clothing. A nice button down shirt and a pressed pair of slacks will do the trick. A man can add a tie and a woman might prefer a long skirt. Be respectful in court. Address the judge as “Your Honor” and “Sir” or “Ma’am”. Stand when speaking and spoken to.

Finalizing Your Divorce

• Complete any necessary classes, courses, and/or tests: Many states have parenting classes and education courses that some or all divorcing parents are required to take before a divorce will be granted. Check with the county clerk, the court, or an attorney to determine if there are any instructional courses you need to take in order to have your divorced granted.
• Obtain and file any remaining forms: Once your waiting period is over your Final Decree or Decree of Dissolution will be granted by the state. You may then be required to file this decree as well as other remaining documents as a way to confirm that it needed no modifications and was correct. If you are unsure what you need to file besides the final decree, check the instructions that came with your form, or with the Clerk of Courts.
• Wait for a copy of your decree: Once the Judge signs your final decree, the court will mail you a certified copy of the decree or a notice telling you it is ready for you to pick up. If you do not receive anything from the court within your state’s given jurisdiction time (usually 30 days) of filing your final documents and/or attending your final hearing, call the court to inquire. The court typically allows a standard length of time during which modifications, corrections or reforms can be filed by either party.
Uncontested Divorces and Contested Divorces
A contested divorce is one where the parties cannot agree on some or all issues. It may involve a trial, and it may involve lengthy settlement meetings. It may also involve digging into your spouse’s finances, which takes a lot of time and energy.
An uncontested divorce, however, takes a lot less time because you agree with your spouse about:
• Custody
• Visitation
• Child support
• Spousal support
• Division of property
• Division of debt
• Other issues, such as education and religion
• Life and health insurance
If you want to get a divorce fast, an uncontested divorce will help you do that. An uncontested divorce also will save you money in legal fees, will reduce stress, and will get you through the court system much faster than a contested divorce.
No-Fault Divorces Versus Fault-Based Divorces
All states have some form of no-fault divorce, although in some states, you have to be legally separated for a year or more before you can get a no-fault divorce. A no-fault divorce that doesn’t require legal separation also can speed up your divorce because it eliminates the need to prove grounds for divorce, such as adultery, cruel and inhuman treatment, or abandonment. A no-fault divorce prevents the parties from blaming one another for the end of a marriage. In most states, a no-fault divorce is accomplished by stating under oath in court or in papers that you and your spouse have irreconcilable differences or are incompatible. If your divorce is a no-fault divorce, you can claim that you want a no-fault divorce in your divorce papers. A divorce can be both no-fault and uncontested. In some states, if you have a no-fault, uncontested divorce, you may never have to go to court and your divorce can be done on what is called “papers only.””
To file a no-fault, uncontested divorce, you’ll need:
• To satisfy residency requirements
• To purchase an index number
• To have a summons and complaint or petition served on your spouse
• To have your spouse file a response to your complaint or petition
• To fill out forms that put the case on the court calendar
• An affidavit of service for the papers that were served
• Income, spousal support, and child support worksheets
• A parenting plan in some states
• A marital settlement agreement, separation agreement, or stipulation of settlement—which are different ways of saying the same thing, depending on your state
• Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law or similar papers
• Judgment of Divorce
• Additional divorce papers, such as statements by each spouse
• Any other papers your state requires

Utah Divorce Lawyer

When you need legal help for a Utah Divorce, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Can A Lawyer Stop Wage Garnishment?

Construction Subcontract Law

Steps In A Utah Probate

What Is The Advantage Of A Legal Separation?

What Are The Drawbacks Of Private Financing?

Utah Criminal Code 76-5-107.5

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Taylorsville Utah Divorce Attorney

Taylorsville Utah Divorce Attorney

Taylorsville is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. It is part of the Salt Lake City, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 58,657 at the 2010 census. Taylorsville was incorporated from the Taylorsville-Bennion CDP and portions of the Kearns metro township on July 1, 1996. The city is located adjacent to Interstate 215 and Bangerter Highway. It is centrally located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley. The area called Taylorsville today is made up of two historic communities in the central part of Salt Lake County: Taylorsville and Bennion. These communities incorporated through a vote of the people with over 70 percent approval in September 1995. The city officially became the City of Taylorsville during the centennial anniversary of Utah’s statehood in 1996. The land on which Taylorsville is located is part of an interconnected alluvial plain that was formed by the wearing down of the Wasatch and Oquirrh Mountains to the east and west. Beneath the surface, Taylorsville sits on more than a kilometer of unconsolidated rock, sand, and clay. The inactive Taylorsville Fault has been traced down the center of the Salt Lake Valley. Lake Bonneville shaped the topography of the area and deposited lake bottom clay and sand. As Lake Bonneville dried up over the past 14,000 years, the salt from the breakdown of rock remains, making the soil alkaline. Like most desert soils, it has little organic material and is hard to work.

A broad, east-west running ridge called “Bennion Hill” rises perhaps a hundred and fifty feet above the surrounding area. Bennion Hill is the eastern end of a wide ridge that rises toward Farnsworth Peak in the Oquirrh Mountains to the west. The first (unnamed) people in the region appeared during or after the last ice age on the shores of what remained of Lake Bonneville. Less than five miles (8 km) from Taylorsville evidence of people killing and eating a mammoth have been found.[5] Some of this region’s first named visitors were Fremont people who used the area to hunt and gather food along the Jordan River more than a thousand years ago. A large Fremont settlement on City Creek used the land where Taylorsville is located as hunting and foraging especially along the river. In more recent times Ute bands passed through the valley between the marshes of the Great Salt Lake and Utah Valley. Most of the area was dry sagebrush-covered land without any natural water sources except the Jordan River. A well-used Ute trail wound along the west side of the river at approximately 1300 West which the Ute used in spring and fall. Early settlers observed small encampments of Ute in the cottonwoods along the Jordan River. At least one local settler called these people the “Yo-No'”. Whether the name is his creation or an approximation of something they said is unknown. There are poorly documented suggestions that Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and explorers came through the area beginning in the mid-1600s. The whole region was called “Teguayo” and “Lake Copalla” (Utah Lake) appear on maps of Spanish Nuevo Mexico.[6] Spanish and then Mexican land claims remained until the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican War in 1853 and ceded the whole of northern Mexico to the United States including a few thousand Mormon settlers who had taken up residence in July 1847.

Winning Divorce Strategies In Taylorsville, Utah

1) Make decisions only to help you and not to harm your ex.
Don’t give your ex a second thought when it comes to planning your best possible future. If divorce is the best option for you who cares if your ex is free to remarry as well? They may not want another possible bust-up later down the line and being free to remarry is the last thing they want. And while you’re at it, don’t be tempted to hide, lie, or perjure yourself to make sure your ex gets as little as possible. You probably will get found out, even years later, and then it will all start again together with a huge costs bill. Don’t exaggerate either. Be fair and realistic. If the Judge accepts what you say is fair he will most likely be on your side.
2) Come to terms with where you are now.
It’s happened and now it’s time to accept this is the lowest you will feel and then move on. Time will heal you far more than you think. However, don’t be in too much of a rush either. Try and pace this sensibly. Don’t be full of guilt, don’t be full of regrets. Decision made, a new life beckons so give it your best shot. Don’t reject counselling. It can be very helpful especially if you feel guilty about the breakdown of your marriage. Accepting where you are is an important part of moving on.
3) Don’t allow yourself to look down or back.
It’s tempting to look back and wallow in self-pity, lose weight, cry, be angry, and just give in to all those negative emotions. Unfortunately it will only harm you, and no one else. So don’t waste your breath. Get a grip, look forward and get rid of all that anger. Exercise and keep exercising until you’ve burned your anger away in calories. You will feel a lot better for it. Never depart from your strategy of moving onwards, upwards and away from where you are now. So remember, however tempting, don’t send an email or text to your ex after a glass or more of wine, don’t email around your ex’s company to get revenge.

4) Always be respectful of your ex.
Don’t flaunt a new relationship in their face. Treat your ex with respect and hopefully it will work both ways. You once were a partnership. Think of how you used to bounce off each other when it was successful. Work on those skills at this, the most important time for both of you and of your children. Threats, withholding money or the children, arguments, silences, anger – none of it will work. Kindness and respect might.
5) Get the right lawyer for you.
Someone who will give you confidence and won’t be afraid to tell you straight out if you’re asking too much or giving too little. If the lawyer isn’t strong and pragmatic enough with you, how would that work in practice? Doing everything you want might result in you being left with a huge costs bill and a poor outcome. Make sure you fully understand the cost and the likely outcome. You’ve chosen your lawyer, now you want to be on the same page as your lawyer. If you don’t know, or aren’t sure, don’t guess. You want a good partnership with a lawyer. Remember this too: a lawyer who can’t give you a reasonable range is probably not the one you want on your side.
6) Don’t settle unless you’re absolutely sure.
You might be under pressure to settle but rarely asking for time is unreasonable. There’s no point crying later. Keep calm take advice and then when advised to settle only do so when you feel ready. On the other hand you’re paying your lawyer to advise you, don’t dismiss it out of hand either. If you have a good relationship it shouldn’t be a problem.
7) Think about your future.
Be bold and be positive. Think about your future but don’t be unrealistic either. Don’t say you’re going to do something if you can’t. And if a house needs to be sold to give you enough money to live then face it. A home is more important than a house. And if it’s in your name, it’s your future security.
8) Treat the situation always as a challenge to be dealt with and conquered.
Let time help you move on. Have that as a mantra. Time does heal I think it really does. Pain fades. People fade too. Do your best to put anger to one side in any way you can. When it surfaces make yourself think of something else.
9) Don’t lean on your children.
Understand they have needs and they aren’t there as a support for you. Keep your kids firmly out of this. And don’t change, even if your ex doesn’t do the same. Children aren’t daft but they do need two parents if at all possible. Don’t deny them the best childhood they could have in the circumstances.
Is it better to file for divorce first?
When marriages begin to fall apart, most spouses know that something is wrong. However, many spouses are hesitant to be the first one to file for divorce. Some are unsure about whether divorce is really the solution, others may wonder if they are being hasty and still others may just not know how to proceed. While people’s hesitation to file divorce is understandable, people considering divorce should be aware of the potential benefits that accompany being the first spouse to file for divorce.
Financial benefits of filing for divorce first
Being the first spouse to file divorce means that a person can begin the proceedings at a time when he or she is financially prepared to do so. A person would have had time to collect copies of all important legal documents, such as deeds, bank and investment account statements, wills, life insurance policies, social security cards, titles to property. They will need these papers as part of the property division process, and it may be more difficult to obtain copies after the divorce starts. Also, a person can assess the family finances and determine the extent of their assets and debts, so they will have an accurate idea of what will be divided in the property division. People filing for divorce first also have the advantage of doing so after they have ensured that they have access to money and credit to meet their needs during the divorce process.

Possible legal benefits of filing first

One of the main legal advantages that a person gains by filing the divorce petition before his or her spouse does is that the filer can request a Standing Order from the court when filing the petition. Such an order prevents either spouse from making changes to beneficiaries on policies such as life insurance or retirement accounts, selling, borrowing against or transferring property, changing bank accounts and other similar financial moves. This can be important if the spouse filing divorce suspects that the other spouse will attempt to hide assets. The person who files for divorce also chooses the jurisdiction in which they litigate the divorce. In situations where spouses have lived apart from each other for a substantial period of time, possibly great distances from each other, filing the divorce petition first can prevent having to conduct matters related to the divorce far away from where a person lives. If the matter should go to a hearing, the person who files the petition usually presents his or her case first. This can be a drawback for a spouse if he or she does not wish to reveal his or her strategy to the other spouse. The other spouse then has the opportunity to adjust the presentation of his or her case after seeing the other side.
Talk to a lawyer
Many people become paralyzed by indecision when faced with such a monumental question as whether to file for divorce, or just wait until their spouses file first. This is not a decision that a person should make without gathering all the information possible. Those who feel their marriages are coming to an end should speak with a seasoned divorce attorney who can discuss their specific situations with them and help them decide the best way to move forward.
The Pros and Cons of an Uncontested Divorce
Ending a marriage is never a simple process. However, it can be simpler in some situations when the spouses are able to remain civil and agree between themselves how to divide the marital assets, deal with custody and support issues, and handle any other matters. Also known as an uncontested divorce, it may be hard for divorcing couples to accomplish in many instances, but the benefits can be great under the right circumstances.
The Pros
Uncontested divorce offers divorcing spouses the chance to end their marriage quietly and with dignity. The most obvious advantage of an uncontested divorce is its cost. An uncontested divorce that stays uncontested is almost always the least expensive way of getting divorced. The low cost is not, however, the only advantage of uncontested divorce. If the level of conflict between the two spouses remains low, an uncontested divorce offers a way to keep it that way. It is more private, more cooperative, and likely to keep more of your assets in each of your pockets and out of the hands of lawyers, accountants, process servers, and others required to put on a full divorce proceeding.
The Cons
Uncontested divorce is a bad idea when one spouse is beating up on the other. If there is a history of domestic violence, emotional abuse, or some other disparity in power in the relationship, it almost always leads to one spouse having an unfair advantage over the other. That disadvantaged spouse probably needs an attorney to advocate for them in a difficult situation. Uncontested divorce is also a bad idea when the parties are not able to talk with each other without fighting. If your spouse refuses to have any discussion with you about divorce, or every conversation ends in a screaming match, but you are determined to move forward with divorcing, you will likely need to move forward with a contested divorce and probably should hire an attorney. Similarly, if one or both of you are vested in keeping certain items of property or taking a larger share of the marital assets, then this could lead to an intractable disagreement that may not be easily resolved in an uncontested divorce proceeding. Finally, uncontested divorces are a bad idea if you and your spouse are not comfortable with the law or do not believe you can work through the paperwork on your own. Uncontested divorces are relatively straightforward, but still require you to read and understand a number of different forms which will probably include fairly in-depth financial disclosures by each party. If this idea is intimidating, it may be wise to contact an attorney to assist with the process.
How It Works
The first thing you need to know about uncontested divorce is that you can do it alone or with the assistance of a lawyer. If you use a lawyer, the lawyer you get to do your uncontested divorce cannot represent both of you. Because each spouse will have their own unique interests, the ethical principles for lawyers will require that a lawyer represent only one of the parties, not both of them. The lawyer must represent one of you and not the other. The lawyer will need to know at the outset which of you is his or her client and which of you is not. Generally, every jurisdiction will require you to prepare similar documents to initiate a divorce: a petition for divorce, documents proving both parties are aware of and participating in the case, financial affidavits disclosing everything each spouse has, a settlement agreement, and a proposed judgment. Some jurisdictions may also require you to attend couples therapy prior to granting the divorce. Often, the necessary paperwork is available online or may be procured at the clerk of court’s office. After you produce the documents, and both spouses are satisfied with the papers, you sign and file them. In some jurisdictions that is it; your case will be handled based on the paperwork and you will receive your divorce judgment in the mail. In other jurisdictions, you are required to attend a hearing with your spouse to swear that everything in the divorce paperwork is true and correct and that you were not pressured into signing it.
How Much It Costs
The prices for uncontested divorces vary widely by state. At a minimum you will have filing fees which vary by state to state and sometimes even courthouse to courthouse. Additionally, you may have attorney fees if you require assistance with your paperwork. Still, at the end of the day, you will likely have fees of more than $3,000, even with an attorney, and probably much less (only like two thousand dollars) if you handle everything on your own.

Divorce Lawyer

When you need to get a divorce in Taylorsville Utah, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah

84088 United States
Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Understanding Reciprocity With Neighboring States

What Does Child Support Cover?

How To Legally Get Separated?

Family Lawyer Magna Utah

What Are Estates When You Die?

Utah Criminal Code 76-5-106.5

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Taylorsville, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Taylorsville, Utah
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°39′18″N 111°56′58″WCoordinates40°39′18″N 111°56′58″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Settled 1848
Incorporated July 1, 1996
Named for John Taylor
Government

 
 • Mayor Kristie Overson
 • City Council Ernest Burgess, Anna Barbieri, Meredith Harker, Curt Cochran & Bob Knudsen
 • Presiding Judge Christopher Bown
Area

 • Total 10.85 sq mi (28.10 km2)
 • Land 10.85 sq mi (28.10 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,295 ft (1,309 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 60,448
 • Density 5,571.24/sq mi (2,151.17/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP codes
84129, 84123
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-75360[2]
GNIS feature ID 1433206[3]
Website http://www.taylorsvilleut.gov/

Taylorsville is a city in Salt Lake CountyUtah. It is part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. The population was 60,448 at the time of the 2020 census. Taylorsville was incorporated from the Taylorsville–Bennion CDP and portions of the Kearns metro township on July 1, 1996. The city is located adjacent to Interstate 215 and Bangerter Highway. It is located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley.

Taylorsville, Utah

About Taylorsville, Utah

Bus Stops in Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 3200 W @ 6385 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 3045 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 1531 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 5595 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in SLCC Transit Center (Bay F) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / Redwood Rd (EB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / 2200 w (WB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 5400 S / 1900 w (EB) Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 1685 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in 4700 S @ 3460 W Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Atherton Dr @ 4533 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 6211 S Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Map of Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions in Taylorsville, Utah to Ascent Law LLC

Driving Directions from Texas Roadhouse to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Walmart Supercenter to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Taylorsville High School to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from The Redwood to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Savers to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Eisenhower Junior High School to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from America First Credit Union (inside Walmart) to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Cafe Rio Mexican Grill to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Planet Fitness to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Atherton Park Apartments to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from U-Haul Neighborhood Dealer to Taylorsville, Utah

Driving Directions from Little Caesars Pizza to Taylorsville, Utah

Reviews for Ascent Law LLC Taylorsville, Utah

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

John Logan

starstarstarstarstar (5)

We've gotten divorce and child custody work from Ascent Law since the beginning because of my ex. We love this divorce firm! Staff is gentle, friendly and skilled. Tanya knows her stuff. Nicole is good and Ryan is fun. Really, all the staff here are careful, kind and flexible. They always answer all my questions, explain what they're doing and provide great legal services. I personally think they are the best for divorce in Utah.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Jacqueline Hunting

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I have had an excellent experience with Ascent Law, Michael Reed is an absolutely incredible attorney. He is 100% honest and straight forward through the entire legal process of things, he also has a wonderful approach to helping better understand certain agreements, rights, and legal standing of matters, to where it was easy to know whats going on the entire process. I appreciate the competency, genuine effort put forth, and assistance I received from Ascent and attorney Michael Reed, and I will be calling these guys if ever I have the need again for their legal assistance! 5star review Wonderful attorneys!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Anthony Ziegler

starstarstarstarstar (5)

This review is well deserved for Ryan and Josh. New clients should know they are worth the 5 star rating we give them. We needed 2 sessions from them because of the complexity of the matter, but they are both very passionate about his helping others in need.  My sister needed bankruptcy and I needed divorce.  Sometimes they go hand in hand but a large shout out to this team - also Nicole is one of the sweetest people you ever did meet - she offered me warm cookies!

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Thomas Parkin

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Mike Anderson and his colleagues & staff are knowledgeable, attentive and caring. In a difficult and complex case that eventually went to trial, Mike was the voice of reason and the confidence I needed. His courtroom abilities are amazing and I felt his defense of me was incredible. His quick thinking and expertise allowed for a positive result when I felt the World was crumbling. His compassion, after the case, has helped me return to a good life. I trust Mike and his staff. They are friendly and very good at what they do.

Ascent Law LLC Reviews

Yeran Merry

starstarstarstarstar (5)

I worked with Attorney Alex and Paralegal Ami in my divorce case. I got to know the team very well over the course of two years. I cannot think of a better team to have worked with. Ami and Alex are not only exceptional law professions who are very knowledgeable and thorough, they are also the best human beings who empathize with the emotions I was experiencing. Alex was conscious of my budget and worked efficiently to try to reduce unnecessary legal expenses. My case also involved some dealings with a foreign country that Alex and his team had previously dealt with.  They did an amazing job addressing cultural barriers in a very respectful manner and did not fall short in quality of work or in standards when dealing with some of these new challenges. Ami deserves a medal for being extremely professional, calming, and compassionate when it is needed most.  When you need family law attorneys, call this firm. I now feel I can move forward with grace and dignity.

How Common Is Divorce?

How Common Is Divorce?

Divorce is very common in Utah, United States with almost half of all marriages ending in divorce or permanent separation. Commitment has been shown to be a clear factor in why some couples stay together. There are times when divorce is necessary, but those in other circumstances often later indicate they wish they would have tried harder before divorcing

What Percentage of Marriages End In Divorce?

Researchers estimate that 40%-50% of all first marriages will end in divorce or permanent separation and about 60% – 65% of second marriages will end in divorce. Although divorce has always been a part of American society, divorce has become more common in the last 50 years. Changes in the laws have made divorce much easier. The highest divorce rates ever recorded were in the 1970s and early 1980s. Divorce rates have decreased since that time, but still remain high.

What Factors Are Associated With A Higher Risk For Divorce?

Over the years, researchers have determined certain factors that put people at higher risk for divorce: marrying young, limited education and income, living together before a commitment to marriage, premarital pregnancy, no religious affiliation, coming from a divorced family, and feelings of insecurity.
• Young age: Marriage at a very young age increases the likelihood of divorce, especially in the early years of marriage.
• Less education: Research shows that those with at least some college education (vs. high school or not finishing high school) have a lower chance of divorce.
• Less income: Having a modest income can help couples avoid stress that may lead to divorce.
• Premarital cohabitation: Couples who live together before marriage appear to have a higher chance of divorce if they marry, but the risk is mostly true for those who have cohabited with multiple partners. A common belief is that living together before marriage provides an opportunity to get to know each other better, but research has found those that live together before marriage have already developed some leniency towards divorce. This leniency towards divorce is what leads the couple to become high risk. However, there are some caveats to these findings. Research suggests couples who get engaged and then move in together are no longer at a high risk for future divorce. Their commitment towards marriage reduces the risk of a future divorce.

• Premarital childbearing and pregnancy: Childbearing and pregnancy prior to marriage significantly increase the likelihood of future divorce.
• No religious affiliation: Researchers have estimated those with a religious affiliation compared to those who belong to no religious group are less likely to divorce.
• Parents’ divorce: Unfortunately, experiencing the divorce of your parents doubles your risk for divorce. And if your spouse also experienced their parents’ divorce than your risk for divorce triples. This does not mean you are predisposed to having your marriage end in divorce, only that you may need to be more aware of your marriage trends and work harder for a successful marriage.

Most Common Reasons People Give For Their Divorce

Research has found the most common reasons people give for their divorce are lack of commitment, too much arguing, infidelity, marrying too young, unrealistic expectations, lack of equality in the relationship, lack of preparation for marriage, and abuse. Many of the common reasons people give for their divorce can fall under the umbrella of no longer being in love. Research suggests the nature of love changes over time. If you feel as if you have fallen out of love, marriage counseling may help offer a new perspective that will help you rediscover that love.

Why is commitment so important?

Commitment as “having a long-term view of the marriage that helps us not get overwhelmed by the problems and challenges we experience day to day.” Having a personal dedication to your marriage involves a real desire to be together with one’s spouse in the future and having an identity as a couple. When there is a high level of commitment in a relationship, we feel safer and are willing to give more. Developing this level of commitment can take time as you learn to change your mindset. When your level of commitment seems to be fading it can be helpful to remember the good times in your relationship. Some couples are faced with very difficult situations, such as abuse, infidelity, or addictions. Each of these situations deserves special consideration:

Abuse And Divorce

When there is a pattern of abuse in a marriage or in a family, not surprisingly there is evidence that ending the marriage is usually best for all involved. While some spouses are able to end and overcome abuse, abused spouses and children are usually better off when the marriage is ended. Sometimes, ending a marriage with an abusive spouse can be dangerous, however. It is probably a good idea to work with a domestic violence shelter in your community to help you end the relationship safely.

Infidelity And Divorce

Most Americans say they would end their marriage if their spouse cheated on them. However, many couples (50-60%) who have dealt with infidelity in their marriages find the will and strength to stay together. Also, consider getting help from a well-trained marriage counselor and/or a dedicated religious leader, who will help you heal, decide what to do, and repair the marriage, if you decide to stay together. Recovering from infidelity can be very difficult to do without some help.

Addictions And Divorce

Addiction can come in many forms, such as alcohol, drugs, gambling, or pornography. In some cases, the addict can recover and the marriage can be repaired. In other cases, it is best for the spouse and children to separate from the addict to see if progress can be made. Each person has unique circumstances and must decide what is right for her or him. Again, consider turning to a trained professional and/or a religious leader to help you know how best to handle your situation.

Extramarital Affairs And Divorce

According to a report published by AARP, infidelity still plays a significant role in why people file for divorce. It is reported that about 17 percent of divorces are caused by one or both partners being unfaithful. However, usually there is an underlying reason that causes a spouse to cheat, including anger, resentment, having varied interests, growing apart, or unequal sexual appetites.

Physical Appearance And Divorce

Physical attraction to your partner can predict marital satisfaction in the long run. According to a recent study, conducted longitudinally, men reported feeling happy in their marriage if they perceived their wives as being attractive, with their satisfaction increasing over time. Women reported feeling about the same over time, without their satisfaction increasing or decreasing. For men, their spouse’s physical appearance can act as a future predictor for successful or unsuccessful marital outcomes.

Money And Divorce

In fact, lack of money can often cause marital problems to flare into a divorce filing. A married couple facing financial difficulties is often under a lot of stress, which in turn can lead to constant arguing and lack of communication. Couples who don’t see eye to eye on spending habits or that are in relationships where one spouse controls the finances are at risk for a divorce, with an estimated 40% of divorced couples noting this as the main reason for ending the relationship.

Lack of Communication And Divorce

Healthy communication is one of the most important ingredients when it comes to a successful marriage. If one or both partners are not willing to work through their communication issues, marital satisfaction declines as both partners’ needs are no longer being met. Once parties stop communicating effectively, marital troubles that can lead to divorce may not be too far behind.

Incompatibility And Divorce

Nothing stays the same. Over time people grow, develop, and change. Around 55 percent of divorced couples cite growing apart from their spouse as their primary reason for ending the marriage. When partners’ lives, interests, or dreams become incompatible, the marriage can begin to suffer as a result. Divorce Magazine reports that incompatibility is often the reason people end up filing for divorce. Incompatibility can also lead to a spouse seeking interaction with a person of the opposite sex, which can lead to infidelity.

Unhappiness

Unhappiness lies at the root of a high number of divorces. Sometimes individuals don’t realize that love is not enough to keep you happy. Some people get married and then realize that they are not cut out for marriage and what can come with that type of lifestyle. Research states that marital dissatisfaction is one of the top predictors for divorce.

Parenting Style Differences

Parenting is an even larger undertaking than getting married. Once children come into the picture, priorities change, lifestyles change, and for sure sleeping habits are impacted. Differences in parenting style is a major reason couples seek divorce. For example, imagine one parent believes in letting a child cry and the other believes in a more hands-on approach. Unless the parties can communicate and work out a common solution, issues like this could lead to a split.

Different Perceptions of Equality

A couple can marry with the expectation that both will share equally in the amount of work to run a household, as well as for expenses and financial decisions but in reality one spouse ends up in control or expected to do more than another. Or they can marry with an expectation based on their culture or religion that the division of labor and responsibilities will be unequal at the outset. Over time this can lead to anger and resentment by the spouse who feels they are treated unequally. If the couple cannot communicate and follow through with a respectful and fair distribution of labor and responsibilities for their home, finances and child rearing tasks, this can lead to a broken marriage and divorce.

Lack of Intimacy

Marriages were sex becomes rare or nonexistent are likely to end in divorce. Marriages can become sexless for several reasons, such as the partners growing emotionally apart, too busy and tired from work and caring for children or for medical issues, mental health problems and physical disabilities. Without counseling, marriages can fall apart without regular physical and emotional intimacy. About 15 to 20% of marriages in the U.S. are “sexless” and about 50% of these results in a divorce.

Medical Problems

One spouse suffering from a serious or debilitating illness can often lead to divorce. In addition to a health problem causing problems for physical intimacy, it can lead to substance abuse, depression and anxiety, as well as financial issues like debt. More often than not, research has found that it is an illness suffered by the wife that leads to divorce. A wife with a stroke and heart disease in particular appear to significantly increase the chance of divorce.

Religious Differences

Almost half of all marriages in the Utah are between interfaith couples. If these couples do not seriously discuss prior to marriage how religion will be handled in child rearing and other serious life events, divorce can result. Surveys have found that couples in interfaith marriages are at a risk of divorce that’s three times higher than non-interfaith couples.

Leading Causes of Divorce In Utah

When you see problems on the horizon within your marriage, it is best not to wait until they are beyond fixing to address them. If you review the most common reasons for divorce, many are issues that can be resolved if both parties are open to working on them. Finding appropriate marriage counselors or support groups can be a great way to begin working through marital issues that continue to crop up. Of course, in situations where violence and abuse are present, the safety of the victimized spouse and any children should be the primary concern. If you do decide to get divorced, take time to process your emotions and seek support if needed.

Utah Grounds for Divorce

In all divorce cases, couples must provide the court with a legal ground to terminate the marriage. Although there are different ways to apply for dissolution of marriage (divorce), every case requires the applicant to list a specific reason for the request. Some states allow parties to file for a fault divorce, which is where you claim that your spouse’s behavior during the marriage caused the relationship to fail. Acceptable grounds for fault divorce vary depending on where you live, but the most common include adultery, drug or alcohol abuse, or abandonment. All states permit couples to request a no-fault divorce, meaning that neither spouse is individually responsible for the breakup. Typically, no-fault divorces are based on irreconcilable differences. In these cases, couples need to prove to the court that despite your best efforts, there are too many issues in the relationship for reconciliation to be possible. The most appealing factor of no-fault divorce is that spouses can ask the court to terminate their marriage without the need for finger pointing or mud-slinging. Many states also offer a divorce based on a separation for a specific period of time.

Utah and No-Fault Divorce

If you’re not interested in airing your dirty laundry in a public courtroom setting, no-fault divorce is probably the best option for ending your relationship. Utah courts understand that many people, primarily parents, want to preserve what’s left of their bond after a divorce, so it allows couples to pursue a divorce using its no-fault procedures. For divorcing couples to be successful, the parties will need to explain to the court that their marriage has suffered irreconcilable differences. Judges don’t usually make it a habit of questioning the motives behind a no-fault divorce, so if you are willing to testify, under oath, that you and your spouse can’t work things out, a judge will grant your divorce. If you can’t prove irreconcilable differences to the court, you can also apply for a no-fault divorce if you and your spouse have lived separate and apart from each other for a minimum of three years.

Your Spouse’s Bad Behavior May Help You Get a Divorce

No-fault divorce is by far the most popular method of ending a marriage, but for some couples, it’s not the right choice. As an alternative, Utah gives couples the option of petitioning the court for a divorce based on a spouse’s bad conduct during the marriage.
The acceptable reasons for a fault divorce in Utah include:
• impotency at the time of the marriage
• adultery by either party
• willful desertion for more than one year
• habitual drunkenness
• conviction of a felony
• cruel treatment to the extent of causing bodily injury or great mental distress, and
• willful neglect to provide the standard necessities of life.
Other Requirements for Divorce
Like most states, Utah has a residency requirement that you must meet before you can file for divorce. Couples must demonstrate that the filing party has been a resident, continuously, for a minimum of three months. Additionally, there is a 90-day waiting period before the court can hold a hearing for your divorce. This waiting period was created by legislators to provide couples with a “cooling off” period, which may or may not assist the spouses in making meaningful, divorce-related issues, like property division and spousal support. Either party can ask the court to waive this waiting period. The person requesting a waiver would need to file a motion (request) with the court and provide the judge with extraordinary circumstances for their application. Utah law is unambiguous that if a divorcing couple has minor children from the marriage, the court can’t finalize the divorce until each parent has attended a mandatory course for divorcing parents and presented a certificate of completion to the judge. The court can, on its own or if one parent makes a motion, waive this requirement, but this doesn’t typically happen unless the couple can prove that the class isn’t necessary, appropriate, or feasible.

Divorce Lawyer

When you need legal help with a divorce, child support, child custody, asset division in divorce or modification of a divorce decree in Utah, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Title Issues In The Foreclosure Process

Utah Code 76-5-102.6

Federal Crimes

Real Estate Lawyer Heber City Utah

At What Age Should You Make A Last Will And Testament?

Utah Estate Probate Process

Ascent Law St. George Utah Office

Ascent Law Ogden Utah Office

Divorce Mediation vs Divorce Collaboration

Divorce Mediation vs Divorce Collaboration

Neither mediation nor collaboration is necessarily going to be the best—or worst— choice in all cases. Which approach to use is determined by the unique circumstances of your case, your individual preferences, and the availability of good mediators or collaborative attorneys. Here are the most common factors that may influence your choice.

The key features of mediation are:
• neutral person (mediator) helps you negotiate
• mediator has no power to decide the case
• informal
• flexible
• no obligation to hire a lawyer or other adviser
• efficient—less time consuming than litigation, and
• inexpensive—compared to litigation.
The important features of collaborative divorce are:
• spouses are represented by collaborative attorneys
• spouses and attorneys sign a “no court” agreement (attorneys must withdraw if case goes to court)
• spouses and attorneys negotiate in “four-way” meetings
• attorneys may recommend involving collaborative professionals
• informal
• flexible
• more efficient than litigation, and
• less expensive than litigation.

Factors Favoring Collaboration

Need or desire for separate legal representation. If you need the guidance of an attorney looking out for your interests every step of the way, you might find collaborative divorce a better option. For example, your case might involve some complicated legal or financial issues that you don’t feel competent to negotiate. Or you may just be more comfortable with the idea of having a professional to confer with at every turn. In collaborative divorce, the two attorneys guide every aspect of the case, so this approach would address your need for representation throughout the process.

Power imbalance in your relationship

If there are long-standing dynamics in your relationship with your spouse that leave one or both of you feeling at a distinct disadvantage in conversations about difficult subjects, you might want the added insulation and structure provided by collaborative divorce. Having a good collaborative attorney at your elbow can sometimes give you more confidence in expressing what’s important to you, even in the face of your spouse’s disapproval. Or if you know you have a tendency to “take over” in conversations with your spouse, you might find it helpful to have a supportive attorney there to nudge you into respectful silence when necessary.

Downsides to Collaboration

The primary downside to collaboration is that if it doesn’t work, your collaborative lawyer is required to withdraw, and you have to start all over with a new lawyer and possibly new experts and advisers. This means a lot of expense and delay while you get your new lawyer up to speed and retain new professionals. Some lawyers are critical of collaborative divorce for this reason. In addition, some lawyers argue that collaborative law blurs the role of your attorney, who is expected to look for compromises and solutions acceptable to the other side while at the same time representing your interests. Of course, this criticism ignores the fact that if you have chosen to collaborate, you have decided that it is in your interests to find mutually acceptable solutions. Another argument that can be made against collaboration is that because lawyers are more involved in the negotiating process than they generally are in mediation, you may be less likely to arrive at creative solutions —solutions that are outside what the law might prescribe (for example, trading payments for education or job-training now for a shorter period paying alimony in the future). One of the strengths of a nonadversarial process is that the law is only a guidepost, not a prescription, and you are free to decide what actually will work for you. The more lawyers are involved in the process, the argument goes, the less outside-the-box thinking will be applied.
Finally, as in the case of an unsuccessful mediation, there is some risk that a case can become very adversarial if collaboration fails, because there can be a tendency to give up on ever reaching a reasonable settlement. A solution to this problem is to spend time developing an “exit plan” if it looks like collaboration is not working. However, this may not always be possible.

Factors Favoring Mediation

Flexibility and control over the process. Mediation is potentially more flexible than collaboration. For starters, you need only three participants for mediation to take place: you, your spouse, and the mediator. There’s nothing to stop you from adding other people to the process if and when you need them, but you’re not required to have attorneys—or other professionals—actively involved in the process.

Mediation is also likely to be more flexible than collaboration when it comes to the procedures you will follow. Most collaborative attorneys belong to a collaborative group with its own “protocols”—or rules—that will apply to cases handled by members of the group. This can be a good thing, because it minimizes the possibility of miscues between the professionals. But the trade-off is that you may have less input than you would like in how and when things happen in the case. This won’t happen in mediation, where you work directly with the mediator on deciding both the process and the substance of your case.

Efficiency and cost savings

Mediation is potentially more efficient and cost-effective than collaboration. Just from a logistical standpoint, coordinating the calendars of four or more people, at least two of whom are busy professionals, is a time-consuming endeavor, one that can add to the cost of the process. In addition, the active participation of two attorneys, and possibly other professionals, makes the cost almost certain to be higher than a mediation in which the two spouses meet alone with the mediator, even if they consult with lawyers and other experts from time to time.

Confidentiality

A few states have laws in place to protect the confidentiality of statements made during a mediation. No such laws have yet been enacted to protect the confidentiality of collaboration. You do share attorney-client confidentiality with your own collaborative lawyer, but the four-way meetings are not considered “confidential” settlement discussions, and the laws protecting settlement discussions are far from absolute. While you can—and should—sign a confidentiality agreement if you choose collaborative divorce, the enforceability of such an agreement may be subject to exceptions. If confidentiality is important to you, and if you are in a state with strong laws protecting mediation confidentiality, you might be better off mediating.

Downsides to Mediation

If you aren’t able to reach a settlement through mediation, you may have to start over, and you will have “lost” the money you spent on the mediation process. In some cases, your consulting lawyer might not be a litigator, forcing you to start over with a new lawyer for the contested case that could be your next step. (If you are concerned that mediation might not work, you should be sure you hire a consulting attorney who can go the distance with you.)

In addition, if mediation doesn’t result in an agreement, there is a temptation to completely abandon the idea of coming to a mutually acceptable settlement. If so, your case could become highly contentious. These downsides are fairly minimal, though, because the cost of mediation is generally so reasonable. Also, you may be able to shift over to a collaborative process or another non adversarial process rather than going into all-out litigation.

Divorce Mediation Lawyer Free Consultation

When you need legal help with divorce mediation or divorce collaboration in Utah, please call Ascent Law LLC for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Post Foreclosure Property Preservation

Marriage And Family Lawyers Salt Lake City

What Is A Copyright?

Securities Lawyer Salt Lake City

How Do You Probate A Will Without A Lawyer?

Foreign Direct Investment

Is There Any Likelihood Of A Wife Keeping The House In Divorce?

Divorce Attorney

The house is often considered the trickiest of all assets in a divorce. On Day One as you approach divorce, you may be thinking, “My house is one of my biggest assets.” or “Maybe I want to keep it.” “What you really need to understand is that there’s a lot of due diligence to be done before making a decision on what to do with the house.” The hardest part is that there are many emotional and financial events that happen during a divorce. You might also tend to think, “I know my home. It’s the only consistent element to this whole disruptive process of divorce.” That’s why you might be inclined to want to stay or keep the house.

Major reasons why it’s so difficult to know what to do with the house in divorce:

• You are Distracted: Financial dilemmas layered on top of divorce are incredibly overwhelming and stressful. You are likely trying to maintain your current lifestyle, taking kids to sports, working or looking for a job. There are many things happening at once.

• Your House is a Symbol of Stability (and maybe even status): The house itself might come to symbolize some stability and consistency, especially for kids. They don’t want to change schools. It’s a safe-haven during times of disruption.

• Hard to Know Whether You Can Afford to Keep the House: Change is constant. House conditions, the economy, and job security may change; all affecting whether or not the house upkeep, taxes, bills, and mortgage are affordable. Real estate values are fluid. Let’s say that you decide to keep the house, and the value is determined to be $100,000. Then, something happens to the economy, or an interstate goes up in the backyard, or something happens to that value down the road. Can you withstand that?

• Sentimental Value: Your home feels priceless. Dissolving the marriage is emotional. You have poured your heart and soul into creating a loving home environment for your family. You have memories that are priceless and that cloud your ability to make rational decisions. “Most people think of their homes in regards to the memories attached to it. You don’t have memories attached to your 401K.”

Often time’s one spouse will express an interest in staying in the home after the divorce. “Usually but not always it is for the main reason of keeping the children stable after the divorce for a period of time, and to get them through the transition.” When it comes to who gets the house in divorce, “A court can order in the interim who stays or who goes, but what if a couple is in the house, and you are not sure what to do with it, and the house then could become a financial burden to one or both of you. If neither spouse can afford to live there, or if it is deemed not prudent for them to be there, then it’s not sensible for the children to be in that home. And because they cannot be supported adequately in that home, then a court may order the selling of the house and division of the proceeds. “If a spouse is awarded the house in the settlement agreement and they are currently not on title then they would be a ‘successor-in-interest.’ In other words, they are able to claim the title to the property via the signed marital settlement agreement. So they can do a mortgage refinance for divorce, but it would be a cash-out refinance because they aren’t on title. So they are limited to a mortgage amount of 85% of the value. They would have had to be on title for 12 months to do a rate and term refinance.”

Reasons to keep the house in your divorce

• You can afford it easily on your own. This means that after any refinance, buy-out, you can easily afford monthly mortgage payments, taxes, insurance and upkeep on your own income. If you require alimony or child support to stay in the address, that is too risky. You can create a single-mom budget easily on Tiller, an easy-to-use budgeting app.

• The home is the biggest financial asset for most couples. You walk away from that, you may lose a lot of assets even if he buys you out. Why? Historically, real estate has been a more stable investment when compared with stocks (recent years being an exception). Between 1978 and 2004, real estate appreciated an average of 8.6 percent per year. While stocks returned more than 13 percent during that time, they also saw more peaks and valleys. True, stocks grew more. However, that is just appreciation not including the wealth-building associated with paying off a mortgage, or the tax advantages.

• Because your household income is very likely to be lower post-divorce in the short-term, the tax write offs like mortgage interest and property taxes will be even more valuable post-divorce. Plus, if you were to sell your home, you can likely pocket most or all of the profits tax-free. Only a few investment vehicles provide such a tax perk.

• It may make sense to keep the house if it is easy to maintain on your own, without too much physical, emotional or financial cost. How to run a single-mom household like a boss

• You can make an argument for keeping in the event that it will help facilitate peaceful co-parenting. For example, if staying put means you can live closer to your now-ex, or closer to schools or each of your jobs, which makes everyone’s life more convenient, ‘happy co-parenting’ can be a reason to argue for staying put. Rules for co-parenting with even the most toxic ex

• The emotional reasons to keep the house include providing a measure of stability for you and your kids during a tumultuous time. This includes staying in the same schools and close to friends and neighbors who provided emotional and practical support. However, there are lots of very good reasons to let your marital home go whether to your ex, or to sell it on the market. One of the biggest mistakes I have seen in my work, as well as have heard from divorce attorneys, is women’s insistence on keeping the marital home in divorce to her detriment.

Reasons Not to keep the house in divorce

• You can’t afford it. Accepting that your income is now lower after divorce, and therefore you lifestyle must change, is often very difficult especially for the lesser earning spouse, who unfortunately is usually the woman. Going into debt, facing losing that very home you so desperately want to hang on to, and the emotional turmoil that financial stress induces is just bad news. Don’t.

• Selling helps you move on. Houses are emotional things. That house likely represented a family and life that you wanted very much to succeed but things turned out differently. Nothing like new real estate (and furnishings!) to re-launch your new life, and put your old one behind you. The same goes for when you sell an engagement ring or some other item that you shared.

• A new home is empowering! Whether you are purchasing a new house or renting a place on your own, moms tell me that doing this solo is one of the most empowering things they’ve ever done.

• It (might) teach your kids financial responsibility financial. Because your home is likely your biggest financial asset, you should treat it with as little emotion as possible. Compromising your finances, emotional well-being and good sense for the sake of keeping a house you really like is not a good financial example for your kids.

• Selling (might) teach your children emotional resistance. Sometimes life sucks giant, hairy donkey balls. It just does. Divorce is usually like that. But showing a measure of grace, moving on, and making wise decisions for your whole family in the face of rotten times is one of the greatest gifts you can give your kids.

A cash-out refinance means that you apply for and receive a new mortgage for more than you owe. Typically, you can cash-out up to 85 percent of your home’s value.

Pros of a cash-out refinance during a divorce

• Easy way to access cash during a time when you may not have a lot of it
• Interest rates on mortgages tend to be lower than if you were to do a home equity line of credit, home equity loan, personal loan, or credit card advance.
• Interest rates on your first mortgage are usually tax-deductible
• You can keep your home and don’t have to move, which can be important at a time when everything in your and your kids’ lives is in flux.
• The mortgage is now in your name only, removing your ex from the debt and deed — which can feel really powerful for you, and be an important step in separating from your marriage and starting your life anew.
Cons of a cash-out refinance during divorce:
• Compared with a home-equity line of credit or home equity loan, closing costs can be higher
• Signing a new mortgage may extend the period for which you pay for the home — even if monthly payments are the same or lower (this happened to me).
• Signing a new mortgage may increase the overall sum you will pay for the property if interest rates have increased since you first financed it.
• If the refinance means you end up with less than 20 percent equity in your property, you may need to add PMI, or private mortgage insurance, onto your loan.

Qualify for a cash-out refinance in your divorce

The qualifications for a cash-out refinance mortgage are the same as a new mortgage, in most cases. Because you are now divorced and seeking to own the home in your name only, the qualifications are for you as a single person (not as a couple). Since a cash-out refinance is essentially the same as taking out a new mortgage, requirements for qualifying are similar. Homeowners who own their homes and meet the following criteria may qualify:
• Good or excellent credit (FICO score of 670+)
• Significant home equity: at least 20 percent of the home’s value
• Ability to repay the loan
• A debt-to-income ratio including the new mortgage payment approved by the lender.

During divorce, finances are often very tight where there was once one household with two-income or one income plus a full-time person caring for the home and kids there are now two households, two sets of insurance premiums, and increased need for child care not to mention legal fees. Obtaining a new mortgage is a big commitment. Even though you may be emotionally tied to your current home, staying put is not always the best answer. Even if your mortgage payment stays the same after the refinance, you may not be able to afford it without stress and scramble every month. Also, while the thought of leaving your home may feel traumatic today, you may feel differently in months and years to come. In fact, you may want to break free from old memories and expectations that are attached to the home.

The decision whether to keep or sell the house should be made as a part of the overall global settlement. Consider the assets and debt you expect to obtain in the divorce settlement, your anticipated income and any anticipated support you may receive (alimony or child support). Also consider the tax effects, such as the mortgage interest deduction, which may decrease your tax burden and therefore increase the amount of your income available to you. If you cannot comfortably afford the housing expenses, it might be best to consider selling the house and replacing it with something more affordable. Take your time with this decision and utilize all of the resources available to you: your lawyer, accountant, financial planner, and a trusted friend or family member who is knowledgeable in these matters.

Divorce Lawyer Free Consultation

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law LLC (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

ATF Audits Of Firearms Dealers

Duty To Disclose In Foreclosures

What A Car Accident Lawyer Says

Child Support For The Unwed

Salt Lake City Contract Attorney

ATV Accident Lawyer Grantsville Utah

Is Divorce In Utah Easy?

Is Divorce In Utah Easy?

If you enter into marriage under the age of 20 and/or have an income of less than 25,000, your risk of divorce skyrockets. Throw in a spouse losing their job or a surprise pregnancy, and your marriage may be doomed before it begins. Here in Utah, we have a tendency to marry quite young. The median age of marriage in the United States is 27 for women and 29 for men. Now compare that to the average age of marriage in Utah, which is 24 for women and 26 for men.

Divorce Has Declined Nearly Everywhere Except Utah

Utah’s divorce rates run slightly higher than the national average. Statistics often attribute this to Utah having larger families than the national average, citing more than 5% of families have 7+ family members compared to the 3.25 national average (2013).

Utah Requires Divorcing Couples to Attend a Divorce Education Class
Utah legislators have created a mandatory divorce orientation course that couples must complete. Your divorce cannot be finalized until both you and your significant other have completed the course. You are only required to take the divorce education class if there are minor children involved. The one-time class reviews resources for custody and child support issues, clarifies the divorce process, and consequences of divorce. More information about Utah Divorce class requirements and fees can be found here.

People May Judge You and Ask Why

The news that you are getting divorced has spread through your church, neighborhood, and/or workplace, and we are a curious species. Don’t be surprised when people you barely know ask you why you the nitty-gritty on why you are getting divorced. Insensitive comments such as, “did she leave you for someone younger?” and other flagrant comments are to be expected. For the sake of your children, you may not wish to respond in detail.
While you are preparing your financials for your divorce, be sure to take some time to handle the emotional side as well. People may even tell you that they haven’t liked your ex since before you got married. They are not usually trying to make you feel bad; quite the opposite, they are usually trying to tell you that they agree with your decision and are trying to make you feel better. My point – PREPARE YOURSELF for these comments.
Friends and family members may also take sides or disappear completely. You may be the spouse who was cheated on, and people may still not take your side. Divorce is a distressing topic, and people may want to distance themselves from the perceived drama. Just remember to stay true to yourself, cut out the negative people, and create a foundation of support. Divorce gets easier as time goes on, and surrounding yourself with those that will help you weather the storm helps the process move faster.

You May Feel Terrible About Getting a Divorce – It’s OK

There is much guilt and regret present in nearly every divorce. You may easily blame yourself because you run through all the things you could have done differently, because your children blame you, or you may feel guilty simply because you were the one who filed the divorce papers. This is normal!! Make a choice to move forward, and take care of yourself. Throughout the divorce process you will have good days and bad days. Feeling guilty or overwhelmed does not mean that you should give the other spouse everything. Doing so will probably not lessen the grief on either side, and you are still entitled to half of everything.

Additionally, people may want to tell you their divorce horror stories. Please remember that every situation is different, and you shouldn’t let someone else’s negative experience stress you out. When you are feeling stressed, rely on professional advice from your family law attorney, mental health counselor, or financial advisor as they are qualified to give you answers pertaining to your specific situation.

Parenting After Divorce May Become More Difficult

There will be many disagreements – maybe not fair or logical ones. There may be pain when you refer to your ex as “mommy” to your kids, however that is her name to them, and you need to be the adult about it. No matter what are your kids are, please practice HIGH levels of self-control and not bad mouth the other parent in front of your children. You may think with the other spouse out of the picture, that you can make all parenting decisions by yourself. If you’re granted sole legal custody, then you can make major decision about the kid(s) by yourself. Having sole physical custody simply means that you are the parent the kid(s) live with. Make a choice to try to co-parent as best you can. If you can’t get along, you may need to have separate birthdays, and the more times in your kids’ lives you are going to miss out on. Just because you are divorced, doesn’t mean that you have to be enemies.

If the Utah Divorce Decree is Violated, There Can be Serious Consequences.
Once the court has ruled and the papers have been signed, both parties are bound to the terms set forth in the divorce decree. Violating any part of the agreement may put the violator in contempt of court, and your family law attorney can help you file a contempt motion. The most common divorce violations are non-payment of child support, not complying with the visitation schedule, withholding visitation, and non-payment of alimony. If your ex does not bring the kids back at the time set forth in the divorce decree, the police will not help you bring them back unless there is an immediate threat to them. What the police will do is come to your house and make a record of “visitation interference,” which your family law attorney can use as evidence in a contempt hearing. In your court hearing you must be able to state what areas of the decree have been violated, and the burden of proof always lies with the accuser. If you are found in contempt, the violator may be given a period of time to correct the issue or they may face jail time until the matter is resolved.

If you ex is not paying alimony or child support due to unemployment, you can’t make your spouse pay if they do not bring in an income, however, past due child support will accrue. Your family law attorney will likely recommend that you contact the Utah Office of Recovery Services (ORS). The ORS makes sure that Utah parents are responsible for their children’s support, and can help you collect a judgment. Click here for more information on the Office of Recovery Services.

Salt Lake City Divorce Attorney

I understand that a Utah Divorce is emotionally exhausting, even outside of the legal realm. We are a family-owned law firm specializing in handling many difficult circumstances when it comes to Salt Lake City family law situations. We specialize on father’s rights in Utah and are equally skilled in representing a mother’s position as well. Whether you are dealing with divorce, separation, alimony, child support, custody, paternity, domestic violence, or visitation issues, Wall & Wall Attorneys at Law can help. We offer legal representation that is cost-efficient and trustworthy. Call us to take advantage of our free divorce consultation.

Do-It-Yourself Divorce (DIY Divorce)

For uncontested divorces, our most popular service offered is our Do-It-Yourself Divorce. Doing your own divorce through Utah Legal Clinic is easy and economical. The process will save you substantial money and allows you to end a marriage with minimum involvement by lawyers and the legal system. We have been helping people in Utah do their own divorces since 1973. To qualify for a Do-It-Yourself Divorce, your divorce must be completely uncontested. This means you and your spouse must be in full agreement as to all terms. Many times, Utah Legal Clinic can determine quickly over the phone if you qualify for the Do-It-Yourself Divorce service. In most cases, no court hearing is required for uncontested divorces.

We recommend that you come in and visit us and stay away from do it yourself divorce stuff. You wouldn’t do your own dental work. You would do your own open heart surgery. Don’t do your own divorce.
• Intake appointment with a Paralegal and/or Attorney to determine that you qualify for a Do-It-Yourself Divorce;
• Preparation of all necessary documents;
• Notary for all your signatures requiring a notary on the divorce paperwork;
• Detailed step-by-step instructions for filing your own papers and getting all necessary signatures from your spouse;
• Copies of all executed documents for you;
• Copies of all executed documents for your spouse;
• Assistance throughout the steps of your “Do-It-Yourself Divorce,” if needed.

Who Is Eligible?

In order to represent yourself, that is for you to do your own Do-It-Yourself Divorce, both you and your spouse must agree upon all terms of the divorce such as debt division, property division, and child custody.
In order to complete a Do-It-Yourself Divorce, your divorce must be simple. Parties that have been separated for a long time, who have few debts, and who have already physically divided all of their property can easily proceed with a Do-It-Yourself Divorce. We encourage you to have already mutually agreed with your spouse as to all terms of the divorce before you come in for your appointment. You should prepare a complete list of all items that have been resolved, how debts and property should be divided, etc. Our office can help you determine if your divorce is considered simple. Representing yourself in a divorce involving complicated terms or extensive debts and property is discouraged.

Filing Fees

The filing fee for a divorce in Utah is $318. That fee is paid directly to the Court when you file your divorce papers. In some circumstances the filing fee may be waived. For more information on waivers, you can visit the Court’s website.

Utah’s waiting period and other requirements

In Utah, you can expect your divorce to take at least one month. Utah Code Ann. §30-3-18 provides that couples must wait 30 days after filing their divorce petition before a final order can be entered.
Prior to 2019, there was a 90-day waiting period was required in divorce cases. The waiting period could also be waived for any good cause set forth in the divorce papers.
In 2012, the Utah legislature amended Utah Code Ann. §30-3-18 to prevent parties from waiving the 90-day waiting period unless they can establish extraordinary circumstances. While it remains, unclear what may qualify as extraordinary circumstances, it is clear that the legislature wanted to make it more difficult for couples to get a speedy divorce. Under the prior version of the statute, couples needed only to assert that they had been unsuccessful in their attempts to reconciliation and that they were certain any further attempts to save the marriage would be futile. Now, couples will need to show that there is some other pressing reason, such as a new marriage or extraordinary financial situations, in order to obtain a waiver of the mandatory waiting period.
Even under the best set of circumstances, it will likely take at least 90 days after you file your Utah Petition for Divorce to obtain a final order. If the divorce is contested or the required papers are not filed, the divorce may take much longer. There are numerous affidavits, information sheets and other documents which must be filed with the court before the judge will enter the Decree of Divorce.

With contested divorce cases, it may take years to obtain a Decree of Divorce. Couples are required to fully disclose all financial assets through a lengthy discovery process. It may be necessary to retain other professional to assist in the division of property, such as forensic accountants, home appraisers and tax experts. Couples with children frequently retain guardian ad litem attorneys to interview the children or psychologists to complete a thorough custody evaluation.
Hopefully, Utah lawmakers will eventually realize the need for a faster and simpler divorce process. The current Utah belief seems to be that the courts can save marriages by slowing down the divorce process. When a couple decides that their marriage is so irretrievably broken that they need to divorce, it is generally not in anyone’s best interests to try to keep that couple together. Nobody knows whether a marriage can be saved better than the two individuals who are living in that marriage. If a couple is able to work out a divorce resolution without court intervention, Utah should let them be divorced.

The family law team at Ascent Law LLC understands the need to have divorce cases handled as quickly and efficiently as possible. Family law attorney Hailey Black can guide you through a contested divorce or work with you to ensure all required papers for your uncontested divorce are in order. During your initial consultation, we will advise you on your options and provide you with an approximate timeline for resolving your divorce case.

With Children

If you have minor children from your marriage, you and your spouse are required to attend a mandatory one-hour Divorce Orientation and a two-hour Divorce Education Class. Information about both classes can be found at Utah Courts. The cost for the Divorce Orientation is $20 per parent, and the cost for the Divorce Education Class is $35 per parent, for a total per-parent cost of $55. The costs to attend those required Courses are the responsibility of each parent. Proof of attendance for both you and your spouse must be filed with the Court prior to your divorce being entered. You should plan on attending the orientation and parenting class as soon as possible after you have filed your initial papers and received your case number. You do not have to attend that class with your spouse.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

ATV Accident Lawyer Herriman Utah

Can I Dispute a Contract?

Racketeering Charges

Family Law Child Support

Computer Software Lawyer

Loan Modifications

Does It Matter Who Files For Divorce First In Utah?

Does It Matter Who Files For Divorce First In Utah

Ultimately it does not matter.

When marriages begin to fall apart, most spouses know that something is wrong. However, many spouses are hesitant to be the first one to file for divorce. Some are unsure about whether divorce is really the solution, others may wonder if they are being hasty and still others may just not know how to proceed. While people’s hesitation to file divorce is understandable, people considering divorce should be aware of the potential benefits that accompany being the first spouse to file for divorce.

Financial Benefits of Filing For Divorce First

Being the first spouse to file divorce means that a person can begin the proceedings at a time when he or she is financially prepared to do so. A person would have had time to collect copies of all important legal documents, such as deeds, bank and investment account statements, wills, life insurance policies, social security cards, titles to property. They will need these papers as part of the property division process, and it may be more difficult to obtain copies after the divorce starts. Also, a person can assess the family finances and determine the extent of their assets and debts, so they will have an accurate idea of what will be divided in the property division. People filing for divorce first also have the advantage of doing so after they have ensured that they have access to money and credit to meet their needs during the divorce process.

Possible Legal Benefits Of Filing First

One of the main legal advantages that a person gains by filing the divorce petition before his or her spouse does is that the filer can request a Standing Order from the court when filing the petition. Such an order prevents either spouse from making changes to beneficiaries on policies such as life insurance or retirement accounts, selling, borrowing against or transferring property, changing bank accounts and other similar financial moves. This can be important if the spouse filing divorce suspects that the other spouse will attempt to hide assets. The person who files for divorce also chooses the jurisdiction in which they litigate the divorce. In situations where spouses have lived apart from each other for a substantial period of time, possibly great distances from each other, filing the divorce petition first can prevent having to conduct matters related to the divorce far away from where a person lives.

If the matter should go to a hearing, the person who files the petition usually presents his or her case first. This can be a drawback for a spouse if he or she does not wish to reveal his or her strategy to the other spouse. The other spouse then has the opportunity to adjust the presentation of his or her case after seeing the other side.

Advantages of Filing First

If you file the initial Utah divorce petition, the court considers you to be the petitioner. Being the petitioner can be beneficial for several reasons:

• You don’t have to scramble to select a divorce attorney in time to file a response.

• You get to choose a convenient start time and establish deadlines for the case.

• You have time to prepare for the financial costs of divorce.

• You may have more of an opportunity to protect community assets.

• You won’t have to worry about your spouse stalling the divorce.

Advantages of Being the Respondent

If your spouse serves you with divorce papers, you’re the respondent. While playing this role may not have as many obvious advantages, being the respondent can be beneficial because:

• You have a chance to review your spouse’s requests before making decisions.

• Your divorce attorney can build an effective strategy based on the petition.

• You save money on filing fees and, in some cases, on service fees.
If you’re the respondent, you need to seek out legal counsel as soon as you’re served. You only have 21 days to respond if you were served in Utah, or 30 days if you were served outside of the state. If you fail to file a response within that time, the court may grant a default judgment, giving your spouse exactly what they have requested. Many people want to file first, but there are no consequences to being the respondent. Both parties in a Utah divorce are equal in the eyes of the law, and both have the opportunity to present their case. In the end, it won’t matter whether you’re the petitioner or respondent. Your Utah divorce attorney will be on your side, fighting for your rights and working to achieve the best possible outcome. If your marriage is over and you’re ready to file for divorce, having a skilled advocate in your corner is far more important than being the first to the courthouse.

The Divorce Process

A divorce starts with a divorce petition. The petition is written by one spouse (the petitioner) and served on the other spouse. The petition is then filed in a state court in the county where one of the spouses resides. It does not matter where the marriage occurred. The petition includes important information regarding the marriage. It names the husband, wife and any children and states if there is any separate property or community property, child custody, and child or spousal support.

Serving the Divorce Petition

The petition (or the divorce papers) must be served on the other spouse. This phase of the process is called “service of process.” If both spouses agree to the divorce, the other spouse only needs to sign an acknowledgement of the receipt of service. However, if the other spouse refuses to sign or is difficult to locate, you can hire a professional process server to personally deliver the papers. Completing service of process starts the clock running on your state’s waiting period. It also sets automatic restraining orders on the spouses and helps establish the date of separation. At this point, the spouses are not permitted to take any children out of state, sell any property, borrow against property, or borrow or sell insurance held for the other spouse.

Divorce Petition Response

The other spouse is known as the “respondent.” Although it’s not required, the respondent can file a response to the petition saying he or she agrees. Filing a response shows both parties agree to the divorce. This makes it more likely the case will proceed without a court hearing, which could delay the process and cost more. Generally, if a response is not filed within 30 days, the petitioner can request that a default be entered by the court. The responding spouse can also use the response to disagree with information presented in the petition.

Final Steps of a Divorce

Both spouses are required to disclose information regarding their assets, liabilities, income and expenses. If the divorce is uncontested and the spouses can agree on the terms of the divorce, there is only a bit more paperwork to file. Once the court enters the judgment, the divorce is final. However, the marriage is not formally dissolved and the spouses cannot remarry until the end of the state’s waiting period. If there are disputes that cannot be resolved, court hearings and maybe even a trial will be required.

What is an Uncontested Divorce?

If you and your spouse are worried about expensive, protracted court hearings, you can probably relax. According to CBS News, only about 5% of cases ever make it to trial. Other sources cite the number as being less than 5%. While estimates vary depending on who you ask, it’s easy to see what they all share in common: they’re tiny. Even in the worst case scenario, the likelihood of going to trial is minimal. That being said, it’s certainly not unheard-of. The good news is that the course your divorce follows is largely up to you and your spouse. In order to understand why, you have to have a general understanding of the Utah divorce process.

First, the petitioner files a complaint (petition) for divorce, which initiates the legal process. The spouse on whom the petition is served is known as the respondent. Once the respondent has been served with divorce papers, he or she has just 21 days to file an answer. (Out-of-state respondents have 30 days.) The nature of the respondent’s answer can set the divorce down a few different paths:

• If the respondent fails to file an answer within the allotted time period, then the petitioner can ask the judge to grant a default judgment. Ignoring divorce papers will not stop the divorce from happening; it will simply strip the respondent of his or her legal ability to challenge the petitioner’s demands.

• If the respondent agrees to everything in the complaint, including requests for alimony and/or child support payments, then the divorce is uncontested. If a divorce is uncontested, you can move ahead with the divorce process by filing the appropriate forms. However, even if you and your spouse are able to agree on the petitioner’s proposals regarding division of property, child support, and so forth, it is prudent to retain a family law attorney to ensure the proper and timely filing of legal documents. Some of the documents you will need to file include:

• Acceptance of Service
• Affidavit
• Certificate of Divorce, Dissolution of Marriage, or Annulment
• Financial Declaration
• Stipulation
• Summons
• If the respondent disagrees with something in the complaint – for example, he or she wants to fight for sole custody instead of agreeing to joint custody – then the divorce is contested.

Even if aspects of the divorce are being disputed, it still doesn’t mean that trial is inevitable or even necessary. If you and your spouse initially disagree on how matters like custody, alimony, and division of property should be handled, then you will be sent to mandatory mediation. Mediation is not like litigation (going to court). In litigation, the parties stand in opposition to one another, and each party seeks a different outcome. A judge presides over the trial, and renders a judgment based on the facts which are presented. If the court’s orders aren’t obeyed for instance, if a spouse stops paying child support, rather than trying to have the terms of the support order modified then the non-compliant person is in contempt of court and can be fined and jailed. In mediation, a qualified mediator works with both parties to help them come to a resolution that both people can agree on. While mediation isn’t always effective, it does have several distinct advantages over litigation: it tends to be quicker, less expensive, and less formal. Plus, because mediation is inherently less adversarial than litigation, it can be desirable for divorcing spouses who want to stay on good terms for the sake of their children. Trial is essentially a last resort, the final method of resolving the disagreements between you and your spouse. If mediation fails to solve your disputed matters, it will become necessary to go to trial before a judge. You and your spouse are not officially divorced until the judge grants the final divorce decree. However, even at this stage, either party may appeal if he or she disagrees with some aspect of the judge’s decision. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days of the decree’s entry.

Divorce in Utah

If you enter into marriage under the age of 20 and/or have an income of less than 25,000, your risk of divorce skyrockets. Throw in a spouse losing their job or a surprise pregnancy, and your marriage may be doomed before it begins. Here in Utah, we have a tendency to marry quite young. The median age of marriage in the United States is 27 for women and 29 for men. Now compare that to the average age of marriage in Utah, which is 24 for women and 26 for men.

Utah’s divorce rates run slightly higher than the national average. Statistics often attribute this to Utah having larger families than the national average, citing more than 5% of families have 7+ family members compared to the 3.25 national averages (2013).

Utah Requires Divorcing Couples to Attend a Divorce Education Class
Utah legislators have created a mandatory divorce orientation course that couples must complete. Your divorce cannot be finalized until both you and your significant other have completed the course. You are only required to take the divorce education class if there are minor children involved. The one-time class reviews resources for custody and child support issues, clarifies the divorce process, and consequences of divorce.

The news that you are getting divorced has spread through your church, neighborhood, and/or workplace, and we are a curious species. Don’t be surprised when people you barely know ask you why you the nitty-gritty on why you are getting divorced. There is much guilt and regret present in nearly every divorce. You may easily blame yourself because you run through all the things you could have done differently, because your children blame you, or you may feel guilty simply because you were the one who filed the divorce papers. This is normal!! Make a choice to move forward, and take care of yourself. Throughout the divorce process you will have good days and bad days. Feeling guilty or overwhelmed does not mean that you should give the other spouse everything. Doing so will probably not lessen the grief on either side, and you are still entitled to half of everything. Additionally, people may want to tell you their divorce horror stories. Please remember that every situation is different, and you shouldn’t let someone else’s negative experience stress you out. When you are feeling stressed, rely on professional advice from your family law attorney, mental health counselor, or financial advisor as they are qualified to give you answers pertaining to your specific situation.

Parenting after Divorce May Become More Difficult

There will be many disagreements maybe not fair or logical ones. There may be pain when you refer to your ex as “mommy” to your kids, however that is her name to them, and you need to be the adult about it. No matter what age your kids are, please practice high levels of self-control and not bad mouth the other parent in front of your children. You may think with the other spouse out of the picture, that you can make all parenting decisions by yourself. If you’re granted sole legal custody, then you can make major decision about the kid(s) by yourself. Having sole physical custody simply means that you are the parent the kid(s) live with. Make a choice to try to co-parent as best you can. If you can’t get along, you may need to have separate birthdays, and the more times in your kids’ lives you are going to miss out on. Just because you are divorced, doesn’t mean that you have to be enemies.

If the Utah Divorce Decree is Violated, There can be Serious Consequences.
Once the court has ruled and the papers have been signed, both parties are bound to the terms set forth in the divorce decree. Violating any part of the agreement may put the violator in contempt of court, and your family law attorney can help you file a contempt motion. The most common divorce violations are non-payment of child support, not complying with the visitation schedule, withholding visitation, and non-payment of alimony. If your ex does not bring the kids back at the time set forth in the divorce decree, the police will not help you bring them back unless there is an immediate threat to them. What the police will do is come to your house and makes a record of “visitation interference,” which your family law attorney can use as evidence in a contempt hearing. In your court hearing you must be able to state what areas of the decree have been violated, and the burden of proof always lies with the accuser. If you are found in contempt, the violator may be given a period of time to correct the issue or they may face jail time until the matter is resolved. If you ex is not paying alimony or child support due to unemployment, you can’t make your spouse pay if they do not bring in an income, however, past due child support will accrue.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Why Should I Get A Legal Separation In Utah?

Lawyers In Salt Lake City

Utah Divorce Mediation Attorney

Which Bankruptcy Is The Worst?

How Much Does It Cost For Estate Planning?

Do You Always Lose Your License After A DUI?

Why Should I Get A Legal Separation In Utah?

Why Should I Get A Legal Separation

No one can stop you from getting a legally separated if you want one, with the possible exception of the court. If you don’t follow proper legal procedure, a judge can deny your separation, forcing you to start over. Your spouse can’t stop you, but she can complicate the process.

• Decide what ground you want to use to file for your separation. All states require that you give a reason in your divorce petition for ending your marriage. All states also provide for some version of no-fault divorce. In either case, you have the burden of proof to show the court your ground exists. If you chose a fault ground when your spouse is already resisting the divorce, you’ll provide her with an opportunity to contest it by denying the wrongdoing. She generally can’t contest a no-fault ground.

• Research the rules for service of process in your state. You can call your county court, a legal aid center, your local paralegal association or consult with a lawyer. Make sure you understand exactly what you have to do to ensure that your spouse legally receives a copy of your divorce petition after you file it. If you err, your spouse can say she wasn’t properly served and block your divorce proceedings. You could still get a divorce, but you’d have to start the process all over again.

• Wait out the period of time your state gives your spouse to answer your divorce petition. If she files a response with the court, you’ll probably have to resolve your divorce by trial; she won’t agree to a settlement if she doesn’t want the divorce.

• Call the court again to find out how you can move forward with a default judgment if your spouse ignores your divorce papers and doesn’t answer them within the allotted time. In most states, this requires filing a request for default, then appearing at a hearing to testify that you’ve met your state’s filing requirements and to prove your ground. If you chose a no-fault option, your opinion that your marriage is over is usually enough. Otherwise, you might have the added task of convincing the judge that your ground happened, such as by proving adultery or cruelty.

• Prepare for trial if your spouse does answer your divorce petition. If you used a no-fault ground, the trial will only address issues of property division, support and custody of your children. Gather all documentation you can to prove the value of your assets and the extent of your debts and write a proposed parenting plan to address custody and time with your children. If you filed on a fault ground, be prepared to substantiate it, just as you would have to have done at a default hearing. In a trial, however, your spouse can raise defenses against your ground, such as that you condoned her behavior. If she’s successful, the judge won’t grant your divorce on that ground, and you’ll have to start over, filing a new petition and using a ground she can’t disprove.

Signs You Definitely Need to Get Legally Separated

If you’ve been considering divorce, you may be wondering whether it’s the right decision. It’s normal to have doubts creep into your mind from time to time, but sometimes it’s necessary to take a step back and closely evaluate the situation.

• You’d rather be alone: When you think about the possibility of being single again, you get downright giddy. In fact, you’re already picking outfits for future dates with your crush. If the thought of divorce gives you the giggles, you may want to turn that thought into action.

• Your spouse’s touch makes your skin crawl: His or her touch gives you goose bumps but not in a good way. In fact, it feels like a thousand ants on your skin. This is bad real bad. In a loving, healthy relationship, you should be longing for caressing, cuddling, kissing, and all the wonderful things that come with being with someone you love. If this is not the case, you need to get to the bottom of why you are suddenly repulsed. This alone may not be reason enough to get divorced, but it does signal some serious trouble in paradise.

• You cheated several times: If you or your spouse is getting some action on the side, it’s a clear sign that you have some serious issues. Once you’ve gone this far, your best bet is to take the next steps and file for divorce. You may also want to get checked for STDs while you’re at it.

• You wouldn’t stay even if your partner changed: What is it that needs to change for you to feel good about staying in the relationship? If it’s an issue that can be easily resolved, you might be able to work through it together. If it can’t be resolved, a divorce might be in your future. Whatever you do, resist demanding that your spouse change, and don’t resort to making ultimatums. This behavior will likely cause your spouse to become defensive and do just the opposite of what you are requesting.

• You don’t see a future with your spouse: In the next five years, you imagine a wonderful future full of success. You get to where you want to be in your career, you finally get up the nerve to move to a new city, and you are truly happy. However, your dreams don’t include your significant other. If you can’t see how your spouse fits into your life, do yourself a favor and find someone who does.

• You just don’t care anymore: Your spouse did something that would normally make your blood boil, but now it doesn’t faze you. At this point in your relationship, you’ve checked out emotionally. If there is just no desire to work on your marriage, you’re pretty much done. It takes two people to make a marriage work. Either seeks counseling to see how you can make some needed changes or prepare to jump ship.

• You have too much resentment: The root of every divorce, no matter if it involves adultery, growing apart, arguing a lot, or not being able to agree, stems from the larger root of resentment. At some point in any relationship, someone will harbor resentment for their significant other, which follows the common belief that love and hate is practically the same thing. Resentment can basically heighten throughout the relationship. The key to a successful relationship is to not harbor the resentment, but rather deal with it before it takes on a life of its own. If you or your spouse is feeling resentment, talk it out or consider couple’s counseling.

• Marriage counseling hasn’t helped: Perhaps you’ve gone down this road with your partner before, and nothing has changed. Your needs are still not being fulfilled, and you’re still feeling like you’re better off alone. If you feel as if even the professionals can’t help you, then it might be time for a divorce.

• You know your exact reason for a divorce: Take time to explore what it is about the marriage that is making you want to give up. What exactly is motivating your decision? “Whether you are unhappy or hopeless or too tired to keep trying, understanding your reasoning helps ground you in your decision. And the more that decision is grounded in you wanting something more or different and less about what your spouse did or didn’t do, the easier it will be to deal with the divorce, mourn the loss of this relationship, and move on

• You got married to fix your problems: Just as having kids won’t fix problems that already exist in your marriage, getting hitched in the first place certainly won’t fix any underlying relationship issues either. Marriage won’t solve problems, such as feeling lonely and being unhappy. If you got married because you thought it’d solve your personal or relationship issues, it won’t be long before you realize it was too soon.

In order to get a divorce in Utah, you don’t have to be legally separated first. You can simply file with the court without anyone’s consent, you can show the court:

• That you do not know where your spouse is residing.

• What you have done to locate them, such as contacting relatives and friends, searching the electoral roll, or enquiring with their employer. If you have an address for your spouse, or could locate them through friends or family this will reduce the costs of your divorce.

The Benefits of Legal Separation

Legal separation is very similar to a divorce except for the fact that the marriage is not terminated. For some couples, it may be more beneficial to become legally separated as opposed to getting a divorce. Legal separation and divorce are very similar and they hold basically the same legal functions except for the fact that with a separation, you do not terminate your marital status. When a couple decides to become legally separated, it is not merely a verbal agreement. They can’t simply say that they are not in love anymore and one of them will move out of the family home. Instead, they must go through the same process as couples who wish to undergo a divorce. In a legal separation, the same issues will be addressed as in the termination of a marriage. The couple will have to sort out issues relating to asset division, property division, child support, child custody, visitation and spousal support payments (if there are any). The couple will also have to decide who will pay which debts as well.

There are a number of reasons why parties choose this rather than divorce, and the reasons are usually personal. People can choose separation for religious reasons, personal beliefs, health insurance concerns, or other financial reasons. Oftentimes couples will decide to remain married for one of two reasons: either for the sake of their children, or for a financial reason. For example, if a non-employee spouse has a pre-existing medical condition or some other serious medical condition; they may need to stay on their spouse’s medical insurance so they can keep getting necessary medical care. In some cases the couple may need to remain legally wed until they reach the ten-year deadline for certain Social Security benefits. This holds true for the ten-year deadline for military enforcement advantages or, the twenty-year deadline for PX and commissary benefits. There is another substantial benefit and reason why people choose legal separation and it has nothing to do with health insurance or money. They may be unsure if they really want to end their marriage; therefore, the time apart offers them a cooling off period where they can have time to think about what they really want. They may realize that they really do love each other, and later decide that they want to get back together. It’s a lot easier to get back together after legally spending time away from one another as opposed to having to go through the process of remarrying.

Religion and culture can play a significant role in why couples decide to separate instead of divorcing altogether. In certain religions, divorce carries a negative stigma that many couples wish to avoid. With legal separation the couples can enjoy all the material benefits of a divorce without having to deal with the negative stigma attached. Separation does not allow for remarriage unless the marriage is terminated through a divorce, but it can be assumed that people who part for religious reasons don’t plan to remarry anyway. In many cases it is more affordable for the spouses, especially when the dependent spouse relies heavily on their spouse for medical insurance. When you factor in the quality of life enjoyed through the marriage, along with how much money it would cost for the dependant spouse to take out their own medical coverage (similar to what their spouse has been carrying), then it can be reflected in the alimony payments. Sometimes it is less expensive and allows the dependent spouse to remain on the health insurance, as opposed to paying them larger alimony payments, thus saving the expense for both parties.

Getting a separation in Utah does require some legal paperwork and going through the court system. The same as in a divorce, you want to have a qualified attorney representing your best interests when handling important matters such as child custody, child support, asset division, property division and possible spousal support payments. If you would like to enjoy the benefits of a legal separation, contact a skilled and knowledgeable divorce attorney without delay!

Legal Separation In Utah Free Consultation

When you need legal help with a separation in Utah, please call Ascent Law LLC (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


Recent Posts

Can Infidelity Affect Alimony?

What Are Four Positive Outcomes Of Estate Planning?

Utah Litigation Attorney

Bankruptcy Attorney South Salt Lake

Divorce When You Are Older

How Does A Loan Modification Work?