Do I Have to Endure a Long Court Battle to Get Divorced?

Do I Have to Endure a Long Court Battle to Get Divorced

There is no easy answer to this question. Every divorce case is different. However, the majority of divorce cases are uncontested. This means that the couple was able to agree on issues like alimony, child support, and custody without the assistance of the court. Uncontested divorces are resolved quickly and no court battle occurs.

People think every divorce ends with a long, drawn-out, and contentious clash that involves ridiculous theatrics. This occurs mostly on television, and rarely in the real world.

Child custody is an issue that may cause a divorce to require litigation. However, having an experienced and aggressive attorney by your side can reduce the chances of conflict with your spouse. If litigation becomes inevitable, the court will determine child custody primarily based on what is in the best interests of the children.

Another issue that may lead to litigation is the division of property and assets. However, in many cases, a couple can sit down with their respective attorneys and discuss who gets what without the need of a trial.

If you must go to trial, the cost and length of your divorce will depend greatly on the lawyers you choose to represent you. Avoid hiring a friend or family member who practices law. There are many different types of attorneys and the wrong kind can actually hurt your case. You need a law firm that has extensive experience handling family law and divorce cases.

Avoiding a Divorce

Divorce is a difficult process fraught with stress, anger, sadness, and grief. It can take a number of years and be costly if you are dealing with a spouse who refuses to be reasonable or who is vindictive. Some things that you can attempt to do to strengthen your relationship in the hope of avoiding the differences that lead to divorce include the following:

  • Communicate with your partner. Listen with an open mind. Have a dialogue about the things that bother you or that you need from your partner. Each partner needs to be able to talk openly.
  • Accept change. People grow and goals change over time. Unless you are willing to grow together, your relationship has a strong chance of dying.
  • Spend time together. You need couple time. The only way to know one another and to appreciate each other is to make time away from the demands of life. Some couples set Friday night or a Sunday morning as their time to talk and catch up.
  • Get the help of a professional. Marriage counseling can provide an opportunity for the two of you to talk openly about the things that are bothering you.
  • Bring back a little spontaneity and romance. Boredom can ruin a relationship. Ask your spouse to help you find something new that you can do together to make life more interesting to you both.

If you find you are unable to rescue your marriage, divorce may be the best option. A skilled divorce attorney is available to discuss your situation and advise you.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Estate Planning Forms and Tools

Estate Planning Forms and Tools

Estate Planning Forms and Tools

Although no one likes to think about falling ill or passing away, it’s important to plan for it. Preparing a will allows you to make sure your money and property goes to the people you want them to go to. It’s also important to let your loved ones know your wishes if you ever unable to communicate your wishes. The process of estate planning is the way to plan for death or incapacitation. In this section you can find samples for various estate planning tools, such as a sample will, a sample health care power of attorney, and a sample living will. There is also a helpful estate planning checklist and a questionnaire to prepare you for meeting with an estate planning attorney.

Contents of a Basic Will

While there isn’t a standard, legally foolproof will, there are some basic elements that pretty much every will contains. A will should begin by making it clear that it’s meant to be a will and include the full name and residence of the testator (the person who is making the will). It’s also always a good idea to include a statement revoking any previous wills. The will should include to whom you would like to leave your money and property. If you would like to leave specific belongings or amounts of money to various people, you can list these wishes in the will. If, on the contrary, you simply want to leave everything to one person, you could make a general statement conveying that information. A will should also designate an executor to handle estate administration. It’s usually a good idea to include an alternative executor, in case the original executor can’t or won’t take the responsibility of being the executor. Finally, the testator must sign and date the will. While these are the basic elements of a will, it’s important to check the laws of your state to find out the requirements for drafting a will in your state.

Living Wills and Powers of Attorney

All of the states in the U.S. have laws concerning the ability of people to make decisions about their medical care before there is a need for treatment. A living will or advanced directive is a document that allows people to explain the type and duration of medical care they would like to receive if they are in a situation where they can’t communicate those wishes. Each state has its own laws regarding what can be included in a living will, which is why it’s important to check the laws in your jurisdiction or consult with an attorney when drafting a living will.

It’s worth mentioning that a living will and a health care power of attorney concern similar matters, but are very different. As previously mentioned, a living will explains the wishes of the person in the event that he or she can’t communicate the wishes him or herself. A health care power of an attorney can also have the same information as a living will, but it also designates a person to have the legal ability to make medical decision on a person’s behalf. The health care power of attorney is only valid in the event that the person who makes the document is unable to make medical decisions for him or herself.

Hiring an Estate Planning Attorney

Wills can be fairly easy to draft if a person doesn’t have very many assets. However, if you have a lot of assets or a complex situation, you should probably hire an estate planning lawyer to help you with your will. Regardless of the size of your estate, if you have questions or concerns about estate planning, you might want to consult with an attorney.

Free Consultation with a Utah Estate Lawyer

If you are here, you probably have an estate issue you need help with, call Ascent Law for your free estate law consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Why are Mothers Most Often Awarded Child Custody?

Why are Mothers Most Often Awarded Child Custody?

Why are Mothers Most Often Awarded Child Custody

Though child custody laws generally no longer presume that children should stay with their mother after a divorce, the fact is that mothers are still awarded custody of their children more often than fathers. So what is the reason for this?

First, courts more often find that the mother meets the qualifications for being considered the “primary caregiver.” This is the parent that is best able to meet the needs of the child and who has been shown to be the one meeting the majority of the child’s everyday needs. In many families these tasks are evenly split between parents, and there are some stay-at-home dads that bear the majority of the responsibility for these types of tasks.

However, there are still many more women in stay-at-home or caregiving roles, even despite the fact that many more women are in full-time jobs than in the past. This means that there is still a disparity between men and women in terms of who is likely to be considered the primary caregiver. I’ve seen this many times as a child custody lawyer.

Because of the importance of the primary caregiver, it’s important that both parents do everything they can to handle daily childcare tasks if they believe that a divorce is coming. Courts are much more likely to split child support arrangements more evenly if they see both parents contributing at near equal levels to everyday parenting tasks.

Another key aspect of custody arrangements is the bond between parent and child. Numerous studies have shown that younger children are more likely to have a closer bond to their mother. This isn’t a reflection of the father’s parenting ability so much as it is the kind of roles that parents have at extremely young ages. Therefore, courts are going to be more likely to place very young children with their mothers.

The Effects of Relocation on Child Custody

When a former spouse or partner wants to relocate with your children, it can have a significant effect on your entire family. No matter the reason for the move, divorced parents must follow certain guidelines set forth by the state and through the couple’s divorce agreement.

Providing notice

Custodial parents cannot relocate with children without first providing written notice to the noncustodial parent. Individuals with custody must allow enough time for the noncustodial parent to raise concerns about the move, or challenge the decision in court.

Objecting to relocation

As a noncustodial parent, you may object to your spouse’s move by filing a motion with the court. During your hearing, you can present your case to a judge who will weigh the impact of the move against the best interests of the children. Judges typically consider the reason for the move, the relationship between each parent and their children, the affect the move will have on the children’s quality of life and the affect the relocation will have on relationships with parents and extended family.

Justifying the move

If you are the parent who wishes to relocate, you must provide solid evidence that your move is in the best interests of your children. Relocation hearings are taken seriously, and the judge will want to ensure that you are not relocating your children to physically or emotionally distance them from their other parent. In certain cases, judges may even consider granting custody to the parent who does not move, in an effort to maintain stability for the children.

If your move is approved, the judge will most likely require that a parenting plan be put in place. Such plans may outline specifics related to visitation, long-distance communication, travel expenses and more.

Free Consultation with Child Custody Lawyer

If you have a question about child custody question or if you need to collect back child support, please call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will aggressively fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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FAQ About Open Adoptions

FAQ about Open Adoptions

FAQ about Open Adoptions

As Salt Lake City Adoption Attorneys, we are often asked questions about adoption. Here are the questions most frequently asked about open adoptions that is an adoption where there is some contact between the birth parents, the adoptive parents and sometimes the adopted child.

What are open adoptions?

Open adoptions are adoptions where this is some contact between the birth parents, the adoptive parents, and sometimes the adoptive child. Open adoptions generally come about when the adoptive parents meet and get to know the birth parents of the child. The adoption agreement generally allows for the child to spend most of the time with the adoptive parents, but gives some right for the birth parents to visit and spend time with the child. Generally speaking, open adoptions are formed when the birth parents and the adoptive parents agree that forming a relationship is in the best interests of the child.

Are there advantages of open adoptions?

Open adoptions have many advantages, such as reducing stress of both the adoptive and birth parents. For the adoptive parents, they can get to know and trust the birth parents, and for the birth parents, they can regularly check on the child. In addition, open adoptions are sometimes beneficial for the child who can grow up knowing more about his or her history than having unanswered questions.

Are there disadvantages of open adoptions?

One of the main disadvantages of open adoption is for the birth parents that wish to remain in contact with their biological child. If a relationship between a set of birth parents and adoptive parents sours after the adoption has taken place, the adoptive parents may decide to eliminate any visits from the biological parents that were agreed upon beforehand. Even though these visitation agreements normally find their way into the legal adoption papers, the biological parents have little to no legal recourse to continue their visits to the child.

How can I get an open adoption?

There are generally two ways to get an open adoption.

  • The first is to use an agency that has procedures set up for open adoption. If you have found an adoption agency that allows open adoptions, be sure to read and inquire about their procedures for open adoptions. However, there are many agencies that only allow closed or semi-open adoptions. Indeed, many agencies prohibit the adoptive parents from knowing the identity of the birth parents, and also prohibit the birth parents from finding out which family the child is going to.
  • The second way to get an open adoption is to opt to take part in an independent adoption. However, setting up an independent adoption can be expensive on the front end as you will have to advertise when looking for birth parents that are willing to enter into an open adoption. If you have found birth parents willing to enter into an open, independent adoption, you should hire an attorney that can assist you with all the paperwork and filings you will need to make in order to have your adoption finalized.

One thing to keep in mind is that both the adoptive parents as well as the birth parents should enter into counseling before deciding on an open adoption. Open adoption can have many emotional impacts on both families. It is important to know about the emotions that you may encounter with an open adoption that may not be present in a traditional closed or semi-closed adoption. If you want your open adoption to succeed, counseling is a key step that you should take.

Free Consultation with Adoption Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about an adoption or if you need a lawyer in Utah, please call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

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False Accusations of Abuse During Divorce

False Accusations of Abuse During Divorce

In some particularly contentious divorces, it is all too common for one spouse to make false allegations of abuse in order to gain an upper hand. The presence of abuse by one spouse can have a huge impact on divorce litigation, especially insofar as determining custody of minor children, and can lead to criminal charges in some cases.

While wise Utah divorce lawyers strive to keep discord to a minimum when negotiating a divorce, allegations of abuse change the entire character of the process. Abuse allegations can be very difficult to conclusively disprove and, as a result, often make divorce litigation unavoidable.

If you are involved in a divorce and your spouse has turned to false accusations of abuse, you need to act quickly to prove your innocence. Our experienced divorce lawyers in Utah have seen nearly everything that can happen during the divorce process. We have the investigation and litigation skills to deal with false accusations of abuse and are prepared to handle anything your spouse can throw at you.

We understand that it is important to confront allegations of abuse immediately. Experience has taught us that negotiations may still be salvageable if we can disprove allegations early.

It is much more common, however, for such allegations to signal the end of any chance at a peaceful resolution. That is why we are always prepared to go to trial if necessary to defend the reputations of our clients and their rights to their children and property.

Splitting Up After a Long-Term Marriage: Why?

In 2010, former Vice President Al Gore and his wife, Tipper, announced their separation. By all outward appearances, the couple was happy and comfortable, and the announcement came as a shock even to close friends. Many asked why they were separating.

As a firm dedicated to the practice of divorce and family law on Long Island, we hear and understand the reasons men and women of all ages, in marriages of all lengths, decide to divorce. For long-term, stable couples, divorce oftentimes brings few fireworks, no accusations and oftentimes no infidelity. What contributes to the demise of a long-term marriage?

Consider this:

  • Al and Tipper Gore separated after 40 years of marriage. They raised children, sought and found adventure, and following a process of long and careful consideration, they decided to separate. From their statements, it seems clear they still love each other as friends, but chose to pursue their lives separately.
  • While the end of a long marriage can come rudely, it may also come as an emotional relief. As people live longer and healthier lives, fewer people are willing to accept an empty marriage that lost its love and intimacy long ago. In a recent paper from Bowling Green State University, researchers found the divorce rate for those over 50 has doubled between 1990 and 2010.
  • Divorce after decades means careful consideration about wealth, and often retirement monies as well. While two people can live together less expensively than two can separately, more women and men are choosing to go it alone, understanding the financial difficulties and potentially lowered quality of life that may follow.

By all accounts, the Gores remain happy with their decision and the new opportunities pursued by each party. While causes of divorce are many, changes in time and relationship often spell the end of a marriage.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Children of Wealthier Parents More Affected By Divorce

Children of Wealthier Parents More Affected By Divorce

A study by Georgetown University researchers published in the journal Child Development indicates that children with wealthier parents are generally more impacted by divorce than children with poorer parents. The research suggests that wealthier children will have greater benefits from being part of stepfamilies, but will be more likely to have behavioral problems.

The information gathered in the study was mostly obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth between the years 1986 and 2008. Researchers analyzed the development, health and overall well being of more than 4,000 children in the survey, as well as interviews with mothers of the children that questioned the socio-emotional state of the child.

Then, the researchers split the children up into three groups based on their family income: high, medium and low. Divorce only had a significant impact on the group of children in the top income level. While the researchers haven’t found a surefire cause for this, the hypothesis is that the child is more affected in these situations because he or she is more likely to see a significant change in income in the family. Approximately 60 percent of wealthy families in the United States credit the father as being the main breadwinner, yet after the parents’ divorce, the mother is the one more likely to have primary custody. The child may need to change schools, move to a new home and live in a family with less income. These lifestyle changes make for more stress on the child.

The appearance of stepparents was actually shown to have a positive impact on behavior for children in all income levels.

What Are the Grounds for Divorce in Utah?

After much deliberation, you decided that divorce is the right choice for you. Where do you begin? How do you get started? When does your marriage end and your new life begin? You can obtain the answers to all of these questions by contacting an experienced attorney. As a divorce lawyer, I’m telling you that the most common reason is irreconcilable differences. But you knew that didn’t you.

In Utah, you may file for divorce on the following grounds:

  • Irretrievable breakdown. If the relationship between you and your spouse has broken down for at least six months, you may cite irretrievable breakdown as your reason for wanting a divorce.
  • Cruel and inhuman treatment. You may file for divorce on the grounds of inhuman treatment if you believe your physical or mental health is in danger if you remain with your spouse any longer.
  • Abandonment. If your spouse abandons you by leaving, or kicking you out, for a year or more, you can cite abandonment as your grounds for divorce.
  • Imprisonment. In cases where one spouse goes to jail for three or more years, the other spouse may file for divorce on the grounds of imprisonment.


The most common ground for divorce is no-fault or irretrievable breakdown of marriage. A couple who lives apart for at least one year may file for divorce based on an agreement of separation. With the help of a knowledgeable attorney, you can convert a separation agreement into a divorce agreement, saving you time and money.

No matter what your grounds for divorce, a skilled attorney can fight to make sure you start your new life in the best position possible.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Make a Will

Make a Will

Make a Will

A will is a legal document that allows you, among other things, to designate how and to whom your property is distributed when you pass away. A will also allows you to name a guardian to care for your minor children, if you become unable to do so. A will is a part of estate planning. If you’ve thought about creating a will, then you’ve probably wondered about the types of instructions that you can include, about how a will becomes valid, and about the forms of property that can be distributed. This section provides resources related to making a will, including an overview of the process, steps to help you begin planning for a will, a sample will, and an explanation of common errors to avoid.

Choosing an Executor

One of the most important decisions to make when planning your will is choosing a competent and trustworthy executor. This person is entrusted with carrying out your estate instructions, and executors typically manage the estate’s day-to-day affairs and make sure that estate bills are paid. As you decide on an executor, keep in mind that this person should be someone that your family members and heirs can work with.

Assets and Other Property

People tend to associate wills with the distribution of a person’s assets and other property at death. This is certainly an important component of a will, although there’s more to it. As you begin to plan your will, remember that some forms of property cannot be included. For example, you cannot distribute money that’s held in a joint account, and generally, life insurance benefits cannot be included in a will (these payments automatically go to the policy’s beneficiary).

Guardian for Minor Children

Another important benefit of having a will is the ability to name a legal guardian to care for your children, should you become unable to do so. Although this is an issue that many people choose to avoid thinking about, by naming a trusted guardian for your children, you’re helping to ensure that they will have a bright future, even if the worst case scenario occurs.

Valid Wills

State laws vary, so it’s best to speak with an attorney if you have specific questions about your state’s procedures and requirements for wills. In general, you must be of “sound mind” when you created your will, and you must have voluntarily signed it, meaning that no one coerced or tricked you into doing so. At least one person is usually required to serve as a witness when you sign your will, and if your will violates a law — such as a state heirship law that requires you to name your children as heirs — portions of your will can be disregarded, or the entire will considered invalid.

Call Us For Help

If your estate is relatively simple, you may be able to draft your own will. However, if you have questions, or if your estate is complex, you should speak with an estate planning lawyer. He or she can answer your questions and help you to create a suitable will that’s clear in stating your instructions. This section provides a link for finding an experienced estate planning lawyer in your area.

Free Consultation with a Utah Will Lawyer

If you are here, you probably have an estate issue you need help with, call Ascent Law for your free estate law consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

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Utah Divorce Myths

Utah Divorce Myths

Utah Divorce Myths

Divorce ranks high on the list of difficult life events. Families are torn apart and are forced to build new futures for themselves. But out of the turmoil, life can begin anew. Parties can grow and thrive once again without the toxic environment of a bad marriage.

We understand the difficulties that you are facing in your divorce. Our family law attorneys have helped many people like you through the myths and realities of divorce. These include the following:

    • We should have a child, then we will not get divorced.

       No one should ever have a child to save a marriage. The last thing a faltering marriage needs is the added stress of a child.

    • I have children and should stay married for their sake instead of getting divorced.

       Constant arguing and bickering is bad for children and they may be far better off after divorce. A stable and loving environment without all the drama and hatred that can arise in a loveless marriage is better for children.

    • I will never find anyone again.

       The fact is that most people do find someone else after a divorce.

    • I will lose my property if I divorce.

      Your separate property remains yours after a divorce.

    • If we had not lived together prior to our marriage, we would not be getting a divorce.

       Current thinking is that cohabitation before marrying does not lead to divorce in most cases.

Enhanced Earning Capacity: Reap the Rewards of Your Spouse’s Education

Your commitment to your marriage included your investment in your family’s financial future. In order to increase the financial success of your family unit, you may have sacrificed your own education or career advancement. You now have the right to receive a return on your investment when your partnership dissolves in divorce. The anticipated enhanced earning capacity of your spouse is considered marital property — meaning you own an interest. Yet, unlike dividing money and tangible personal property, you cannot physically divide a college degree, a specialized skill or a professional license. For this reason, the valuation process involves calculations based on a series of complex factors.

Why enhanced earning capacity is considered marital property

Your earning capacity may have been diminished because you forwent educational or career advancement opportunities to support your spouse. In addition, your absence from the job force to raise children can drastically affect your ability to earn the income you would otherwise have been capable of making. Even if you developed a successful career, the decision to promote your spouse’s advancement — through relocation or unbalanced division of childrearing duties, for example — likely hindered your ability to reach your full earning potential.

Calculating the value of a degree, professional license or career advancement

Enhanced earning capacity encompasses a variety of factors that increase potential income — including a college degree, advanced degrees, specialized training, professional license, job promotions and actions that contribute to career advancement. To accurately calculate how much your spouse’s enhanced earning capacity is worth, consider:

  • Type and level of degrees your spouse earned
  • Professional licenses your spouse holds
  • Specialized training your spouse received
  • Statistical income made in the particular field
  • Income disparity based on gender in a given profession
  • Effect of geographic location on incomes
  • Risks to job security
  • Your spouse’s work life expectancy
  • Your income earning capacity

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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How a Child’s Preference Affects Custody

How a Child’s Preference Affects Custody

How a Child's Preference Affects Custody

A child’s preference for living with a parent can affect child custody decisions in many states, including Utah. However, while most judges will consider a stated preference, they are still obligated to rule in a way that protects a child’s best interest.  This means that a child’s preference is not the only factor the court will look at – there are about 25 factors.  This is just 1.

Judges have a great deal of leeway when they make custody decisions. Among the factors they may consider are:

  • Custody preferences of each parent
  • Child’s custody preference, but only if they are old enough to fully comprehend the implications of their choice
  • State of a parent and/or child’s physical and emotional health
  • Perceived stability and resources offered by each parent
  • Potential impact on home and social life, including school and community participation
  • Whether or not parents desire to help sustain a relationship with the other parent
  • History of domestic violence, if applicable

Although all of these issues are generally considered, the safety of the child is of primary importance in a custody decision.

What’s more, while the desire of the child is always taken into account, the older a child is the greater consideration a preference is given. If a child is 13 years of age or older, their preference is given greater weight since they are considered to be more independent and less likely to be manipulated in their choice. Additionally, siblings are typically kept together, although a judge may separate them if he or she believes it to be in a child’s best interest.

In most cases, children are not compelled to testify in court about their desires to live with a particular parent. Sometimes a law guardian is appointed to interview the child and identify his or her needs and desires, or an “in camera” interview is conducted which records the interview that is later transcribed.

Special Factors Influence Child Support Amounts

In Utah, there are certain formulas that judges use to calculate how much child support is owed by one parent to another after a divorce. If you feel as though your case may be an exception to the rule, you have the ability to inform the judge of special circumstances.

Examples of situations where child support may need to be more than what the guidelines suggest may include the following:

  • You have a child with special needs.

    If a child is disabled or has special needs that require additional care or medical treatment, state-recommended child support amounts may not be enough to provide proper care for your child. Increased support may also be needed to maintain a child’s particular passion for an interest such as a musical instrument or membership in a sport’s team.

  • Your spouse earns considerably more than you do.

    If you have primary custody of your children, but your child’s other parent makes a significant amount more than you do, a judge may require the noncustodial parent to pay more than the state’s recommendation. This can also apply if the child’s noncustodial parent has a substantial amount of assets, or if their job provides special compensation measures such as company-provided cars or housing.

Conversely, situations exist where a parent may be required to pay less than what is typically required, including:

  • A noncustodial parent does not have adequate funds.

    Sometimes a parent has experienced a change in their income level and is no longer able to pay the same amount of child support. In this case, a judge may reexamine the total child support required and lower it to a manageable amount.

  • The state’s guideline requires an excess of the child’s situation.

    If a noncustodial parent earns a salary that is greatly above the average person’s income, the state-guided formulas may require a payment of more than what is needed. In this case, the court may lower child support payments to a reasonable amount for the parents’ and child’s circumstances.

Free Consultation with Child Custody Lawyer

If you have a question about child custody question or if you need to collect back child support, please call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will aggressively fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Get Your Employees CPR and First Aid Certified

Get Your Employees CPR and First Aid Certified

Get Your Employees CPR and First Aid Certified

I’m telling you, as an employer lawyer that having employees that are CPR and first aid certified can not only protect employers from personal injury and wrongful death suits, but also make employees feel safer in the workplace. Getting your workforce CPR and first aid certified isn’t as difficult as it may sound. Even smaller cities such as West Jordan, Utah have a variety of certification options for employers. No matter where you choose to complete your training, courses in either CPR or first aid each take about three hours to complete.

American Heart Association

The American Heart Association (AHA) has offices and affiliates all over the United States. The AHA offers traditional classroom training in CPR and first aid as well as a blended learning experience, which combines online courses with in-person practice and testing. Both options will teach your employees what to do in case of an emergency, protecting both the employer and the employees from a wrongful death claim.

American Red Cross 

The American Red Cross offers similar classroom and online certification options as the AHA, and will also come to you and provide on-site training from a certified instructor. If you’d like to have your own instructor in-house, you can send a company representative to the American Red Cross to be trained and certified in teaching CPR and first aid — your newly certified representative can then lead classes in the workplace. The American Red Cross also hosts regularly scheduled community classes in cities such as West Jordan that are open to members of the public.

Local Hospitals and Fire Departments 

Most fire departments hold regular CPR and first aid certification classes that are open to their communities. Often they are willing to come to your workplace and educate employees on proper procedure, helping to save lives and protect against wrongful death. Local hospitals frequently host community courses as well.

Local Colleges and Universities

If your company is located near a college or university, chances are it offers CPR and first aid certification to the public. Employers in West Jordan can find certification courses offered at Davis Applied Technology College as well as nearby Westminster College and the University of Utah.

HOW TO BE A PROACTIVE DRIVER

While one can argue that the leading causes of an auto accident can be texting while driving or driving while under the influence of drugs and alcohol, what these basically amount to is driving while not paying attention to driving. How can drivers in St. George, Utah not end up in an auto accident due to someone else’s negligence?

Proactive vs. Reactive

The difference between a proactive driver and a reactive driver, as any good lawyer will tell you, is on the intention of a person’s actions while driving. Distracted driving is entirely made up of reactive driving, as the only thing a driver can do is drive out of the corner of his eye. If you want to be a proactive driver the first step is to put both eyes on the road, at the very least outside the car. St. George has some gorgeous views, so take those in rather than the latest Youtube video.

Know Your Next Move

Like a good chess master or a seasoned trial lawyer, as you’re driving you should always be several moves ahead of your opponent, or in this case fellow drivers. Plan what lane you want to be in and who to pass, such as an erratic driver or a truck with an unsecured load to avoid an auto accident. The roads around St. George are littered with debris from accidents that could’ve been prevented just from seeing the guy who forgot to tie down his barbecue.

Keep Your Mind on the Road

You may have your phone put away, but that doesn’t mean your bladder isn’t empty or that the kids aren’t screaming. Take whatever stops you need to make to calm the kids and your digestive system. A lawyer who’s seen hundreds of auto accident cases can attest to it not being worth your life to lose your patience and run off the road because your kid dropped a crayon.

Free Initial Consultation with Lawyer

It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. Legal problems come to everyone. Whether it’s your son who gets in a car wreck, your uncle who loses his job and needs to file for bankruptcy, your sister’s brother who’s getting divorced, or a grandparent that passes away without a will -all of us have legal issues and questions that arise. So when you have a law question, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you!

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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