Real Estate Lawyer Salt Lake City

Real Estate Lawyer Salt Lake City

Like any other realtor in Utah—especially anyone working along the Wasatch Front or Back and encountering a wide variety of clientele, circumstances, and demands—a good real estate lawyer in Salt Lake City that knows that the climate, terrain, construction quality, and as always, business relationships are all part of the legal landscape, too. Representing clients in a variety of situations with so many factors contingent upon legal outcomes means that these guys have to be on the top of their game, especially with this legal blog article saying that even “satisfied” clients don’t come back.

REAL ESTATE LAWYER IN SALT LAKE CITY AWARE OF COMPETITIVE MARKET FOR LEGAL BUSINESS

While the writer works for a powerhouse law firm in Manhattan and works with New York City real estate law, the same idea applies to the average real estate lawyer in Salt Lake City and the surrounding towns. The legal market is competitive. What are you, as an attorney, going to do about it? The statistics that the blog author puts forward are that 20% of “satisfied” clients fire their lawyer each year, and that it is less than 1% of “over satisfied” clients say goodbye to their legal counsel.

Okay, so law firms looking to keep clients have to “over-satisfy” them if they want repeat business, and given how difficult it can be to win new clients from firms with which they’re already working, it’s tempting for a real estate lawyer in Salt Lake City to throw up his hands and stick with the old standbys of practicing with integrity and competence and hoping for the best. And while being at your personal best is important, and will certainly develop your reputation and may even get you some friend-or-family, word-of-mouth referrals, unfortunately, it’s not enough.

So how does an attorney make sure he “over-satisfies” his clients? Jokes of Thanksgiving gluttony aside, our legal blog writer working in NYC says the trick is to “wow,” them. Likening the marketing strategies of the practice of real estate law to the marketing strategies of real estate itself, he cites a book by strategists at Ritz-Carlton, whose development of leadership and a superb business model have resulted in hundreds of successful properties raking in money for the company across the globe. Even the name Ritz-Carlton has become suffused within popular culture in songs like “Putting on the Ritz” and adjectives like “Ritzy.”

This isn’t to suggest that lawyers looking for repeat business should team up with firms that have crystal chandeliers or state-of-the-art swimming pools out back—simply that they should shine brighter than the other firms, so that when clients have a choice, they’ll come back to you. Thinking as a client does, this might mean a few things like: efficiency, success in court, lower billing rates, accessibility, expertise, confidence and warmth in communication, to start. The Sandy real estate law firm has taken on a new mantra to remind them to go above and beyond: “A satisfied client is only the beginning!”

Free Initial Consultation with Real Estate Lawyer

If you now need a real estate lawyer, please call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.7 stars – based on 45 reviews


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Buyer Beware in Real Estate Transactions

buyer beware in real estate transactions

A Real Estate Lawyer knows just how caveat the emptor should be in a commercial real estate transaction.

Before you get all 11th-grade-Latin-grammar class on us, we know that the phrase “let the buyer beware” doesn’t really parse into “emptors” being “caveat,” but when you’re knee-deep in a $100,000 or $1,000,000 real estate transaction that’s turning sour, who cares about grammar? A real estate attorney knows all too well the myriad number of things that can go wrong in buying or selling commercial property, but it’s your job as a buyer to do your due diligence before you get so hopelessly entangled in a deal that only a real estate attorney can pull you out of it. The article in the National Law Review has some tips that could save you money and a lot of headaches, but only if you listen to the advice.

Scope: what’s the property for? Are you looking to buy a house to add to your stash of rental properties? Or an entire apartment complex to improve that could have serious implications in the neighborhood? Or a lot for developing a medical complex, or a strip mall, or just a simple local business base? “Determining the property’s expected uses after the transaction” should serve “as a framework for the investigation.” Questions that a real estate attorney might encourage a buyer to ask of the sale would center on zoning restrictions, licensing requirements, and compliance with laws like the Americans Disabilities Act.

But how? Short of hiring a real estate attorney and letting them do all the footwork, where a buyer can start is the insurance policy, which “can be a wealth of information on the property, and any claims history can provide clues as to the property’s past.” Easements and encumbrances would be found on a title insurance policy, which would be helpful to know if they affected how the property could be used in the future.

Real estate lawyers who practice in Salt Lake City, Utah would likely agree with the caveat to examine the seller, too. Whether the seller is in good standing “with the appropriate agencies,” and does he “possess both the interest being sold as well as the authority to sell” are good questions that you don’t want to find out the answers to after you’ve already gone too far in the real estate transaction to back out. Keep an eye out for the seller’s finances too, as “bankruptcy can affect multiple aspects of the transaction.”

Again, the buyer should want to know what they’re getting into before they end up with a piece of property on their hands that came with too many surprises now that their pockets are a good $500,000 or so lighter. The buyer’s due diligence is to research the property and the implications of the transaction to the utmost, so he doesn’t end up shooting himself in the foot. Good lawyers would agree with this, though most attorneys would be happy to help where buyers felt that their interests were better served by a real estate lawyer’s specific strengths and expertise. We all want to know what we’re buying, and be smart about it.

Free Initial Consultation with Real Estate Lawyer

When you need help with a residential or commercial real estate matter in Utah, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.7 stars – based on 45 reviews


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