Divorce and ADR

The thought of you and your spouse going through a divorce is bad enough, without having to deal with a trial to decide who gets the furniture. As much as trials are glorified on television, most legal disputes never make it that far and are usually resolved by a settlement outside of court proceedings. Divorces are no different. Here is a quick primer on divorce and alternative dispute resolution.

Divorce and ADR

Alternative Dispute Resolution and Divorce

Not all divorces have to go to court. A divorce can be resolved through informal negotiations between you and your spouse (usually with attorneys), by using of out-of-court alternative dispute resolution (ADR) proceedings that tend to facilitate a voluntary settlement, or in the traditional court setting. The vast majority of divorces are resolved before issues must go before a judge or jury, many through the use of ADR processes such as mediation, collaborative family law, and arbitration.

For instance, more and more couples are using mediation to divorce issues. And the popularity of mediation has shifted the role of divorce attorneys from representing their clients in a legal battle to acting as divorce mediation lawyers to help clients achieve mediation success. In this new role attorneys can serve as a lawyer coaches, legal consultants, and legal advisers in the divorce mediation process.

Is Alternative Dispute Resolution Right for You?

If you and your spouse decide to proceed with divorce, ADR is one option to resolving any ongoing disputes regarding property division, child custody, child support, etc. ADR may prove to be a beneficial tool in resolving your divorce and related issues, depending on factors such as 1) the degree to which you and your spouse are in dispute on key issues, and 2) your willingness to work together to resolve those issues.

ADR processes tend to be less adversarial and more casual than the traditional court setting, and may encourage and facilitate early settlement. With mediation and collaborative family law, you and your spouse (along with your attorneys) have an opportunity to play an active role in resolving key decisions related to the divorce, instead of having a third party (judge or jury) make those decisions. Rarely used in divorce cases, arbitration is a more structured ADR option, in which a neutral third-party makes decisions after hearing both spouses’ evidence and arguments. The arbitrator’s decision in a divorce case is not necessarily final, and the parties may still be able to resolve key issues before a court at a later date. Most out-of-court divorce settlements will require some level of court approval.

Some states currently require divorcing couples to attempt some form of ADR before proceeding in family court, so it is a good idea to understand your options. You can learn about out-of-court alternatives for resolving a divorce and find help with your divorce.

Learn More About ADR by Talking to a Lawyer in Utah

Going through a divorce, whether inside or outside of a courtroom, can be an emotionally and legally difficult process. For this reason, it’s a good idea to contact a skilled divorce attorney who will be able to guide you through the process, explain the law, and recommend prudent next steps.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will fight for you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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Utah Divorce Basics

Utah Divorce Basics

Utah allows for no-fault divorce, requiring only that the filing spouse allege irreconcilable differences between the parties. A spouse filing for divorce in Utah may also file for a fault divorce, citing any of the following grounds: bigamy, willful absence of the other party for more than one year, adultery, extreme cruelty, fraudulent contract, living separate and apart for more than one year, or incompatibility, among others.

The court may order, either on its own or at the request of one of the spouses, that the parties participate in reconciliation counseling for a period of up to three months or family counseling, if children are involved, for the entire divorce proceeding. If the court orders counseling, it will not finalize the divorce, annulment, or legal separation until the results have been reported to the court.

Residency Requirement for Divorce

The spouse filing for divorce (otherwise known as the plaintiff) must be a resident of Utah for at least six months before the filing.

Divorce Property Division 

Utah is an equitable distribution state, so the court will divide marital property equitably between the two spouses. Separate property is not subject to division–this includes property that each spouse had before the marriage, inheritances or gifts given only to one spouse, and separate property as agreed to in a prenuptial agreement.

Alimony

The court may grant either spouse an award of alimony, also called spousal support, based on factors that include the parties’ respective incomes and earning abilities, the duration of the marriage, and the standard of living established during the marriage. The court may also determine that one spouse’s earning capacity has been diminished or lost because of marital responsibilities, and award alimony accordingly. Support may be awarded in lump sum or as monthly payments.

Child Support

All parents are required to support their children regardless of the status of the marital relationship. The parents will also be required to provide healthcare for the child. Child support in Utah is calculated based on the gross income of the parents and the number of children that the parents support. A judge might make adjustments to the income considered if the parent is responsible for union dues, support for other children, or spousal support obligations. If the parents’ total annual income is less than $6,600 or more than $150,000, it is outside of the guidelines and the court must determine a support amount on its own. The court would use the child support schedule as a guideline and will always take into consideration the best interests of the child when making an order for support.

All child support payments are paid to the Department of Job and Family Services, which facilitates payments to the other parent. Child support payment information can be found at the website for Utah’s Department of Job and Family Services.

Child Custody

A judge looks at numerous factors when making child custody orders, including the child’s wishes, the parents’ wishes, the child’s relationship with both of the parents and the family members of each parent, and whether either of the parents have been convicted of a crime involving child abuse or neglect. The court may order that the child spend equal time with each parent, or establish one parent as the primary residential parent while granting the other parent visitation rights.

A residential parent who wishes to relocate with the child must notify the court in writing; the court will then notify the other non-residential parent of the intent to relocate. If the non-residential parent does not agree to the move or if the judge feels that the move would not be in the best interest of the child, there may be a hearing to determine whether the custody arrangement should be modified.

Free Consultation with Divorce Lawyer in Utah

If you have a question about divorce law or if you need to start or defend against a divorce case in Utah call Ascent Law at (801) 676-5506. We will help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

4.9 stars – based on 67 reviews


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