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What Contracts are Required to Be in Writing?

What Contracts are Required to Be in Writing

Most contracts can be either written or oral and still be legally enforceable, but some agreements must be in writing in order to be binding, says a Utah Contract Lawyer. However, oral contracts are very difficult to enforce because there’s no clear record of the offer, consideration, and acceptance. Still, it’s important to understand which types of contracts absolutely must be written in order to be valid.

Contracts Required to be in Writing

Generally, the following types of contracts need to be executed in writing in order to be enforceable. Contracts in any of these categories entered into verbally are not automatically considered “void,” however. But they are considered “voidable” and may be either affirmed or rejected by either party at any time.

  • Real estate sales;
  • Agreements to pay someone else’s debts;
  • Contracts that take longer than one year to complete;
  • Real estate leases for longer than one year;
  • Contracts for over a certain amount of money (depending on the state);
  • Contracts that will last longer than the life of the party performing the contract; and
  • A transfer of property at the death of the party performing the contract.

The Statute of Frauds

An English law from 1677, the “Statute of Frauds,” provides the basis for current written contract requirements. The goal of written contract rules remains the same as ever-to avoid fraud by requiring written proof of the underlying agreement. This legal goal makes sense as a practical objective as well, since disputes over high-staked verbal agreements typically would lack an objective record of the contractual terms. While state laws generally dictate the enforcement of contracts, all states besides New York and South Carolina have adopted the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) that includes the statute of frauds.

For example, California statute conforming to the UCC explicitly states that contracts for the sale of goods costing more than $500 are not enforceable “unless there is some writing sufficient to indicate that a contract for sale has been made between the parties and signed by the party against whom enforcement is sought or by his or her authorized agent or broker.”

Why It’s Always Best to Get it in Writing

Although other types of contracts may be oral, it is advisable to “get it in writing” to insure both parties understand their obligations. If court enforcement is required, a written contract shows the parties’ obligations and avoids a “he said, she said” dispute. It is easier to check with an attorney prior to signing to see whether a contract is valid than it is to enforce a poorly-drafted agreement after problems arise. While breach of contract lawsuits can be costly to your business, so can unenforceable agreements you thought were cemented by contract law.

Free Consultation with a Utah Contract Lawyer

If you are here, you probably have a question about contracts. If so, call Ascent Law for your free consultation (801) 676-5506. We want to help you.

Michael R. Anderson, JD

Ascent Law LLC
8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C
West Jordan, Utah
84088 United States

Telephone: (801) 676-5506

Ascent Law LLC

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Michael Anderson

About the Author

People who want a lot of Bull go to a Butcher. People who want results navigating a complex legal field go to a Lawyer that they can trust. That’s where I come in. I am Michael Anderson, an Attorney in the Salt Lake area focusing on the needs of the Average Joe wanting a better life for him and his family. I’m the Lawyer you can trust. I grew up in Utah and love it here. I am a Father to three, a Husband to one, and an Entrepreneur. I understand the feelings of joy each of those roles bring, and I understand the feeling of disappointment, fear, and regret when things go wrong. I attended the University of Utah where I received a B.A. degree in 2010 and a J.D. in 2014. I have focused my practice in Wills, Trusts, Real Estate, and Business Law. I love the thrill of helping clients secure their future, leaving a real legacy to their children. Unfortunately when problems arise with families. I also practice Family Law, with a focus on keeping relationships between the soon to be Ex’s civil for the benefit of their children and allowing both to walk away quickly with their heads held high. Before you worry too much about losing everything that you have worked for, before you permit yourself to be bullied by your soon to be ex, before you shed one more tear in silence, call me. I’m the Lawyer you can trust.